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Thursday, April 23, 2015

Iconic Images From Rock And Roll Photographer Henry Diltz

Photographer Henry Diltz, then and now. (Henry Diltz)

Photographer Henry Diltz, then and now. (Henry Diltz)

Henry Diltz snapped this photo of students in Peter Payack's writing course at Berklee College of Music in Boston. (Henry Diltz)

Henry Diltz snapped this photo of students in Peter Payack’s writing course at Berklee College of Music in Boston (click to enlarge). (Henry Diltz)

Henry Diltz is a former musician who took some of the most iconic photos of the 1960s and ’70s, many of which graced the covers of groundbreaking albums. Crosby Stills and Nash, Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, the Doors, the Eagles, all became friends and subjects.

Diltz also shot iconic magazine covers and continues to work today, but when he spoke recently to a group of 20-something students at the Berklee College of Music, it was clear his early work still resonates. He reflected on that early work with Here & Now’s Robin Young. As you listen to their conversation, you can follow along with the images below.

Graham Nash, Stephen Stills and David Crosby, 1969. They decided to be Crosby, Stills & Nash (CSN) after this photo shoot was taken. When they all went back to retake the photos, the building had been torn down. This became their first album cover. (Henry Diltz)

Graham Nash, Stephen Stills and David Crosby, 1969. They decided to be Crosby, Stills & Nash (CSN) after this photo shoot was taken. When they all went back to retake the photos, the building had been torn down. This became their first album cover. (Henry Diltz)

Joni Mitchell, 1970. This photo was taken in Laurel Canyon, a neighborhood located in the Hollywood Hills region of Los Angeles, California. (Henry Diltz)

Joni Mitchell, 1970. This photo was taken in Laurel Canyon, a neighborhood located in the Hollywood Hills region of Los Angeles, California. (Henry Diltz)

Neil Young, 1971. He's pictured at his northern California ranch with his dog. (Henry Diltz)

Neil Young, 1971. He’s pictured at his northern California ranch with his dog. (Henry Diltz)

Neil Young, 1975. (Henry Diltz)

Neil Young, 1975. (Henry Diltz)

Paul and Linda, 1971. This photo ended up on the cover of Life Magazine. Life was doing an article on Paul and they wanted a photo of The Beatles, but Paul wanted a photo of himself because he had just gone solo. Diltz knew Linda McCartney when both were photographers in New York. She called him to take some pictures of Paul and her for the songbook for Ram, but they liked this photo so much that they sent it to Life for the cover. (Henry Diltz)

Paul and Linda, 1971. This photo ended up on the cover of Life Magazine. Life was doing an article on Paul and they wanted a photo of The Beatles, but Paul wanted a photo of himself because he had just gone solo. Diltz knew Linda McCartney when both were photographers in New York. She called him to take some pictures of Paul and her for the songbook for Ram, but they liked this photo so much that they sent it to Life for the cover. (Henry Diltz)

Richard Pryor, 1968. This photo was the front cover of comedian Richard Pryor’s first album, which he titled "Richard Pryor." (Henry Diltz)

Richard Pryor, 1968. This photo was the front cover of comedian Richard Pryor’s first album, which he titled “Richard Pryor.” (Henry Diltz)

The Eagles, 1972. The band staged a “Desperado” photo shoot in Joshua Tree for their first album. This action shot was the back cover of that album. In the documentary "History of the Eagles," Glenn Frey revealed that the band were all on peyote when the pictures for the album cover were shot. (Henry Diltz)

The Eagles, 1972. The band staged a “Desperado” photo shoot in Joshua Tree for their first album. This action shot was the back cover of that album. In the documentary “History of the Eagles,” Glenn Frey revealed that the band were all on peyote when the pictures for the album cover were shot. (Henry Diltz)

The Doors, 1969. Ray Manzarek and his wife Dorothy were driving through downtown L.A. when they saw Morrison Hotel. When the band went to shoot photos there, the guy behind the desk told them they needed the owners permission, and that he was out of town. So, Diltz and the band shot photos in front of the window and when the guy left the desk they ran inside and got this photo. (Henry Diltz)

The Doors, 1969. Ray Manzarek and his wife Dorothy were driving through downtown L.A. when they saw Morrison Hotel. When the band went to shoot photos there, the guy behind the desk told them they needed the owners permission, and that he was out of town. So, Diltz and the band shot photos in front of the window and when the guy left the desk they ran inside and got this photo. (Henry Diltz)

Jimi Hendrix, 1969. Jimi Hendrix playing at Woodstock. “I got to stand on the stage: it was real bizarre and psychedelic,” Diltz remembers. (Henry Diltz)

Jimi Hendrix, 1969. Jimi Hendrix playing at Woodstock. “I got to stand on the stage: it was real bizarre and psychedelic,” Diltz remembers. (Henry Diltz)

James Taylor, 1969. This iconic photo of James Taylor was the album cover for "Sweet Baby James." The photo shoot took place at Cyrus Faryar's farm, which Diltz describes as a creative commune that was out in the hills in L.A. Diltz was told by Taylor’s manager to just take black and whites, but Diltz liked the image of Taylor’s blue work shirt against the barn, so he snapped the some color photos. The color photo ended up being chosen for the album cover. (Henry Diltz)

James Taylor, 1969. This iconic photo of James Taylor was the album cover for “Sweet Baby James.” The photo shoot took place at Cyrus Faryar’s farm, which Diltz describes as a creative commune that was out in the hills in L.A. Diltz was told by Taylor’s manager to just take black and whites, but Diltz liked the image of Taylor’s blue work shirt against the barn, so he snapped the some color photos. The color photo ended up being chosen for the album cover. (Henry Diltz)

Linda Ronstadt, 1968. Ronstadt was a musical “chameleon.” She won numerous awards and experimented in country, rock, jazz and opera. This photo was taken in Santa Monica, Calif. (Henry Diltz)

Linda Ronstadt, 1968. Ronstadt was a musical “chameleon.” She won numerous awards and experimented in country, rock, jazz and opera. This photo was taken in Santa Monica, Calif. (Henry Diltz)

Songs In This Segment

Crosby, Stills & Nash, “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes”
Wings, “Silly Love Songs”
Wings, “Let ‘Em In”
Joni Mitchell, “Big Yellow Taxi”
Joni Mitchell, “Case Of You”
Neil Young, “Sugar Mountain”
The Doors, “Roadhouse Blues”
Eagles, “Witchy Woman
Eagles, “Desperado”
Crosby, Stills & Nash, “Carry On”

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Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

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