90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW
Here and Now with Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson
Public radio's live
midday news program
With sponsorship from
Mathworks - Accelerating the pace of engineering and science
Accelerating the pace
of engineering and science
Thursday, July 17, 2014

Why It’s Good To Talk About Miscarriages

More than one in seven pregnancies result in miscarriage, but miscarriage is still often misunderstood by many couples. (George Ruiz/Flickr)

More than one in seven pregnancies result in miscarriage, but miscarriage is still often misunderstood by many couples. (George Ruiz/Flickr)

Miscarriages are fairly common. One in seven pregnancies end in miscarriage and the number increases as women age.

Many women experience great emotional loss with miscarriage and despite the fact that miscarriage is a very natural part of pregnancy, it is widely misunderstood and rarely talked about.

Karen Gibbons was 29 when she had her first miscarriage and she says that she and her husband felt very much alone because they did not tell anyone about it.

“No one knew what we were going through and other than my husband, I didn’t really have anyone to turn to,” Gibbons told Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson. “I would sometimes just burst into tears for what other people saw as no reason, or somebody would tell me that they were pregnant and I’d have to leave the room because I could feel the tears starting. So that was difficult, putting [ourselves] in that position with no support system.”

“Don’t let anyone set a timeline for you, don’t let anyone tell you that you don’t have the right to grieve. This was your child. This was your hopes and your dreams.”
– Karen Gibbons

Since then, Gibbons has miscarried twice more and also has given birth to two sons, 8-year-old Neil and 4-year-old John. She says the medical system was not very compassionate when she miscarried. She now has changed careers — she has just finished nursing school. She hopes to counsel couples and help them through pregnancy.

“I will tell them that they should allow themselves to grieve,” she said. “Don’t let anyone set a timeline for you, don’t let anyone tell you that you don’t have the right to grieve. This was your child — this was your hopes and your dreams, and you have every right to grieve that.”

Gibbons also wants to help couples avoid the difficulties she faced in her first two miscarriages.

“I would encourage them to also make sure they have a support system in place, make sure they have friends and family that can support them,” she said. “I would encourage them to consider looking into a support group, because there is healing in telling your story.”

Guest

  • Karen Gibbons, recent nursing school graduate and resident of Stoughton, Mass.

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
Spotlight

We now have a digital bookshelf! Explore all our books coverage or browse by genre.

Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

January 28 14 Comments

Zillow And ‘The New Rules Of Real Estate’

The CEO and chief economist of the groundbreaking real estate website explain how the rules have changed.

January 27 113 Comments

Nun Hopes For More Gender Equality In The Church

Sister Joan Chittister describes how the Vatican's tone toward nuns has changed and shares her hopes for the Catholic church.

January 26 4 Comments

Limitations Of Winter Freeze Inspire Maine Chef

The food at Vinland in downtown Portland is 100 percent locally sourced, even in the dead of winter.

January 26 Comment

Mayors Examine Community Policing

The U.S. Conference of Mayors has new recommendations on community policing, in the wake of Ferguson.