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Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Not Your Father’s Hog

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Harley Davidson's "Livewire," the company's foray into the electric motorcycle market. (Latoya Dennis)Riders test out Harley Davidson's "Livewire," which  weighs only about 450 pounds, compared to the 700 to 800 pounds for a more typical Harley (Latoya Dennis)Harley Davidson's "Livewire," the company's foray into the electric motorcycle market. (Latoya Dennis)

Harley Davidson is known for the size of its motorcycles and their distinctive growl. But the bike maker may soon be offering a model that’s a lot quieter.

There’s no shifting and no clutch on the LiveWire, and the motorcycle weighs only about 450 pounds, compared to the 700 to 800 pounds for a more typical Harley.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Latoya Dennis of WUWM reports from Milwaukee on the LiveWire, Harley’s possible foray into the electric motorcycle market.

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