90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW
Here and Now with Robin Young
Public radio's live
midday news program
With sponsorship from
Mathworks - Accelerating the pace of engineering and science
Accelerating the pace
of engineering and science
Friday, May 23, 2014

Who Is In Your Thoughts On Memorial Day?

Massachusetts National Cemetery on Cape Cod is pictured on Saturday, May 25, 2013, after volunteers placed flags on all of the graves, as part of Operation Flags For Vets. (Casey Ashlock/Here & Now)

Massachusetts National Cemetery on Cape Cod is pictured on Saturday, May 25, 2013, after volunteers placed flags on all of the graves, as part of Operation Flags For Vets. (Casey Ashlock/Here & Now)

Let us know who you are remembering on our Facebook page or in the comments.

Who are you remembering today? That’s the question we are asking for Memorial Day, which is the day set aside each spring to honor the men and woman killed in the nation’s wars. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson will have conversations on Monday’s show with two veterans who want to talk about their friends who died, one in Afghanistan, one in Iraq.

For myself and thousands of other veterans across this country, Memorial Day is every day.
– Air Force Captain Joshua Carroll

Former Air Force Captain Joshua Carroll still wears a bracelet with the name Roslyn Schulte engraved on it. She was an Air Force lieutenant who was killed by a roadside bomb in Afghanistan in 2009.

Roz, as she was known, was the first female U.S. Air Force Academy graduate to be killed in action in Iraq or Afghanistan. She was 25. For Josh, thinking about her on Memorial Day is not an isolated thing.

“For myself and thousands of other veterans across this country, Memorial Day is every day, ” he told Jeremy. “I certainly understand people wanting to partake in the festivities and cookouts, and I think in a way in the bigger picture, the people who put themselves in harms way like Roz did, they did that so we can continue on with our lives and do those things.”

Andrew Slater served three tours of duty in Iraq as an Army officer. His best friend Army Captain Ben Tiffner deployed there on his second tour in 2007 just before Andrew did.

“I thought I was just going to see him again,” Andrew said. But that never happened. Captain Tiffner was killed just two weeks after he arrived in Iraq. “He was crossing a bridge when his truck was struck by a bomb. I believe he was killed instantly.” Benjamin Tiffner was 31. He’s buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

Roslyn Schulte and Ben Tiffner are just two of the hundreds of thousands of Americans killed in action. Let us know who you are remembering on our Facebook page or in the comments.

Transcript

JEREMY HOBSON, HOST:

As we head into the holiday weekend, let's talk about the holiday itself, Memorial Day. It is a day for remembering the men and women killed in the nation's wars. Former Air Force Captain Joshua Carroll's friend, Air Force lieutenant Roslyn Schulte was killed by a roadside bomb while serving in Afghanistan in 2009. Josh tells us he will be thinking about her on Monday.

JOSHUA CARROLL: I certainly understand people wanting to partake in the festivities and the cookouts. And I think, in a way, in a bigger picture, the people who put themselves in harm's way, like Roz did, they did that so that we can kind of continue on with our lives and do those things.

HOBSON: Andrew Slater put himself in harm's way. He survived three tours of duty in Iraq as an army officer. His best friend, Army Captain Benjamin Tiffner did not. Ben was killed by a roadside bomb in 2007, just two weeks into his second tour.

ANDREW SLATER: Ben was the kind of officer that made other officers feel very guilty, 'cause he was so focused, he was so dedicated. He was a quiet professional. And he took care of his soldiers. His guys loved him.

HOBSON: So tell us who you will be remembering on Memorial Day. You can let us know at our Facebook page, facebook.com/hereandnowradio or you can go to our website, hereandnow.org.

This is HERE AND NOW. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.


Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
  • Ripleyspawn

    I will be remembering my great uncle, Graham Gray, this Memorial Day. He was a member of the Army Air Corps during WW2 and the only survivor of his flight crew when their plane was shot down over Germany in October of 1943. Despite everything he saw and endured just surviving the crash, his real trial began as soon as he hit the ground. He was captured by German farmers and handed over to the local garrison. From there he was quickly sent to a German POW camp where he endured nearly a year and a half of malnutrition and torture along side fellow Americans and soldiers from every allied nation.
    The story I most vividly remember him telling is of the night the allies were closing in on the camp. The Germans marched out all the POWs to a field miles away. Once there they separated the Russians from all of the other nationalities and killed every single one of them. My great uncle took a pair of boots off a dead Russian soldier because his feet were bare. Two days later the Germans were gone and all surviving POWs were found by a British company and sent home. When he left for war my great uncle weighted 170 pounds and had a full head of hair. When he returned he weighed 87 pounds and was completely bald.
    I will remember him and everyone else who has fought and sacrificed so that we can live the way we do. I am grateful everyday that I was able to tell him how proud I was to be his nephew when he was on his deathbed.

  • Opinionated12cents

    I as privileged to know Captain Benjamin Tiffner. My husband and I flew to DC on Dec.4th went to Arlington on the 5th to see Ben buried with his fellow soldiers. and flew home to Alaska on the 6th. He was our pastors son, and a wonderful Christian man.

  • Holly

    I am remembering my husband, Air Force Lt Col J. Darin Loftis. He was killed in Afghanistan 25 Feb. 2012. He was a wonderful husband and a great father to our two girls. He had just celebrated his 44th birthday. We were 22 when we got married, so I had pointed out to him when we talked on the phone on his birthday that we had been married half our lives!

    Fluent in Pashto and also a speaker of Dari, the languages of Afghanistan, Darin was a valuable asset to the international security forces in working with the Afghan people. Darin was also a returned Peace Corps Volunteer, so he was experienced in working with and understanding other cultures. He also spoke Spanish and Melanesian Pidgin and had studied Catalan, Farsi, and Russian. He had a bachelor’s degree and three master’s degrees, and he loved learning. He was very intelligent but also very humble. He was not a “yes man.” He would not just tell people what they wanted to hear, but would respectfully give honest information and evaluation. This made him a respected adviser to ISAF and Afghan leaders.

    Most of all, though, Darin loved spending time with “his girls” (our daughters and me). When he was killed, he was one month away from concluding a second yearlong deployment. We were looking forward to spending some time together.

    Shortly after he was killed, I came across a quote. I don’t know where it came from, but I found it appropriate. It said, “A man goes to war, not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.”

    Our daughters and I remember my husband/their dad every minute of every day and try to live in a way that will honor him and make him proud. This Memorial Day, and every day, let’s remember all those who gave, in the words of Abraham Lincoln, “the last full measure of devotion.” Let us not take for granted the freedoms that we have in this nation, and let us each use our unique abilities to make the world a better place.

Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

September 12 8 Comments

Senator: Arab Countries ‘Need To Step To The Plate’ In Fight Against ISIS

Mark Begich (D-AK) is one of the few members of Congress speaking out against a key part of President Obama's plan for fighting the Islamic State.

September 12 Comment

Ecuadorian Drilling Damage Inspires Documentary

An American and an Ecuadorian are inspired to help Ecuador heal from decades of drilling and oil spills.

September 11 9 Comments

Doctor: 9/11 Responders’ Illnesses Becoming Worse

A World Trade Center Health Program medical provider says chronic illnesses affecting first responders are lingering and becoming worse.

September 11 Comment

Dennis Lehane Takes ‘The Drop’ From Screen To Page

Author Dennis Lehane discusses adapting a screenplay into a novel.