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Wednesday, April 9, 2014

‘Heartbleed’ Security Flaw Exposes Millions Of Passwords

Experts have discovered a major flaw in the security software used by millions of websites. “Heartbleed,” as the vulnerability has been dubbed, is a bug that affects OpenSSL, a software that operates about two-thirds of all web servers.

OpenSSL is behind many sites that collect personal or financial information such as passwords, credit card info and emails. Although researchers discovered the coding error last week, the problem has been present for more than two years.

NPR’s Technology Correspondent Steve Henn joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to explain the flaw and how the coding error might affect the security of your personal data.

Here are some links you can use if you’ve entrusted a website with your information:

  • LastPass checks whether the website has been vulnerable in the past
  • The “Heartbleed test” shows whether a website is currently vulnerable

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Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

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