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Friday, February 28, 2014

Stay-At-Home Mom’s ‘DrainWig’ Invention Included In Oscar Swag Bag

Jennifer Briggs' invention, the DrainWig, which catches hair lost in the shower and prevents drain clogs, will be in the Oscar swag bags for all the nominees at this Sunday's Academy Awards. (DrainWig)

Jennifer Briggs’ invention, the DrainWig, which catches hair lost in the shower and prevents drain clogs, will be in the Oscar swag bags for all the nominees at this Sunday’s Academy Awards. (DrainWig)

The Academy Award ceremony is Hollywood’s biggest celebration of movie stars. There is some stiff competition in many of the categories this year, and not everyone will leave with a gold statuette — but they will all get a DrainWig.

DrainWig is a daisy-shaped drain ornament attached to a stainless steel chain with rubber whiskers meant to be inserted into a shower drain to prevent hair clogs. It’s one of the many products featured in this year’s Oscar nominee gift bag, which has been valued at $80,000.

The inventor of the product, stay-at-home mom Jennifer Briggs, joined Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to explain how it works and how she managed to get her product into the swag bag.

“If Amy Adams or Sandra Bullock or Jennifer Lawrence puts it in her drain and then tweets about it and says, ‘Oh my gosh, I didn’t have to call in the maintenance guy,’ or ‘I didn’t have to call the plumber and spend 150 bucks’ — really, I mean, these are Hollywood actresses,” Briggs said. “They lose hair. For me to have my little product, that is such a simple, little, inexpensive solution to everybody’s problem, be put in a bag like that is incredible. I mean, words can’t express how exciting that was for me.”

Video: How DrainWig works

Guest

  • Jennifer Briggs, co-founder of the DrainWig.

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