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Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Study Questions Benefit Of Gifted Education Programs

(Steve Ruark/AP)

A study found there was no difference in test scores between children who just barely qualified for gifted programs and students who just barely missed the mark. (Steve Ruark/AP)

In 2008, 73 percent of teachers surveyed by the Thomas B. Fordham Institute agreed that “too often, the brightest students are bored and under-challenged in school.”

Gifted and talented programs are in place to remedy that, and they’re heralded as a breeding ground for high-performing students.

Three million kids nationwide are placed in these exclusive programs — and parents view them as important to their kids’ futures.

But a recent study published in the American Economic Journal found that for students who barely qualify for the gifted programs, and for their peers who just barely didn’t, there was no difference in test scores.

Scott Imberman, an associate professor of economics and education at Michigan State University, co-authored the study and joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the findings.

Guest

  • Scott Imberman, associate professor of economics and education at Michigan State University

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