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Friday, October 4, 2013

‘Hump Day’ Disrupts Class

The Geico commercial “Hump Day,” has gone viral.

Students at Vernon Center Middle School in Connecticut made news when they used the phrase “hump day” so much it became disruptive.

Here & Now spoke to superintendent Mary Conway to see what the fuss was about.

“I found out about this from a TV station where it had just mushroomed,” Conway told Here & Now. “So we’re quite amused but also pretty distracted.”

Conway said just a few students were repeating the commercial’s catch phrase to one another, and teachers just asked them to calm down.

It was a case of kids being kids.

Transcript

JEREMY HOBSON, HOST:

Well, it is Friday, so happy Friday. Although if you're a certain camel, you are probably more fond of Wednesday.

(SOUNDBITE OF AD)

CHRIS SULLIVAN: (as Geico Camel) Uh-oh. Guess what day it is. Guess what day it is. Huh? Anybody?

HOBSON: It's hump day, Mike.

ROBIN YOUNG, HOST:

It's hump day, Mike. Mike the Camel, who lumbers to the cubicles in this new ad from Geico, making his co-workers' eyes roll with his weekly celebration of his day. And apparently he is disrupting classes at a school in Connecticut.

(SOUNDBITE OF NEWS)

KIM LUCEY: The hump day catchphrase from the Geico camel commercial is catching on in the hallways at Vernon Center Middle School.

BROOKE LEWIS: Everybody's walking around in the hallways and saying it's hump day.

(LAUGHTER)

HOBSON: That, believe it or not, is real sound from a real TV station, WFSB. But it turns out this craze was just a couple of kids and a couple of teachers calming them down. We called up Vernon public schools superintendent Mary Conway to ask about this problem at her school.

MARY CONWAY: I found out about this from a TV station where it had just gone and mushroomed. And so we're, you know, we're quite entertained but also quite distracted.

YOUNG: Phew. This is a relief. No third-graders led down the wrong path by a camel. And it does give us a chance to hear more from this guy.

(SOUNDBITE OF AD)

SULLIVAN: (as Geico Camel) Mike, Mike, Mike, Mike. What day is it, Mike?

(as Geico Camel) Leslie, guess what today is.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: (as Leslie) It's hump day.

SULLIVAN: (as Geico Camel) Whoo. Whoo.

HOBSON: We should say, Robin, that Geico is an underwriter.

YOUNG: No, that is not why we love the camel. It's HERE AND NOW. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.


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  • dt03044

    My nine year old son loves this commercial. But I’m pretty sure the camel has no name. It’s the coworker who is named Mike.

  • mcguffey

    Serious lack of journalistic judgment here. The commercial was worth one laugh from me–and laughter is good! (Though even that laugh would probably not have occurred if I had seen this commercial on TV.) But the time devoted to the story–which turned out to be no story (school routine disrupted! nope, we were wrong!)–makes this, essentially, a free commercial for a business. That fact alone might have made this borderline-newsworthy story questionable; but the fact that the show is underwritten by Geico (although appropriately acknowledged) should certainly have landed this free promotion on the other side off the border. Net effect is to make me more hesitant about tuning in.

  • John Heiser

    Not to be picky, but the camel’s name isn’t Mike – it’s actually Caleb, according to a CBS News interview with the agency who produced the spot. Mike is one of the guys Caleb talks to during his stroll through the office.

    http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505270_162-57603417/hump-day-geico-commercial-creators-dish-on-ads-success-its-development/

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