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Thursday, July 25, 2013

An Argument Against Standing Desks

Pace McCulloch)" href="//s3.amazonaws.com/media.wbur.org/wordpress/11/files/2013/07/0725_standing-desk.jpg">(Pace McCulloch)

(Pace McCulloch)

One office worker says he enjoys sitting and he’s tired of the “superior moral attitude” from the standers around him.

Writer Ben Crair told Here & Now he accepts the medical studies showing that sitting at your desk is bad for your health. His objection to standing is based on “the pure satisfaction I get from sitting,” he said.

He argues there are other solutions to the health problem of sitting too long.

“Longer lunch breaks, shorter work days, more vacation,” Crair said. “The standing desk is a solution that certainly your boss loves, but I don’t know if it actually improves life for most Americans.”

As a writer, Crair also wants to mount a creative defense of sitting, because it’s part of the creative protest for most writers, and the way a writer writes reflects his or her individual style.

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