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Friday, April 19, 2013

H&N’s Robin Young: I’ve Met The Suspect

Dzhokhar A. Tsarnaev (left) and Here & Now host Robin Young's nephew are pictured in a Cambridge Rindge and Latin graduation photo. Tsarnaev has been identified as the surviving suspect in the marathon bombings. (Courtesy: Robin Young)

Dzhokhar A. Tsarnaev (left) and Here & Now host Robin Young’s nephew Zolan (right) are pictured in a Cambridge Rindge and Latin graduation photo. Tsarnaev has been identified as the surviving suspect in the marathon bombings. (Courtesy: Robin Young)

The surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings has been identified as Dzhokhar A. Tsarnaev, 19, of Cambridge.

This photo released Friday, April 19, 2013 by the Federal Bureau of Investigation shows a suspect that officials identified as Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, being sought by police in the Boston Marathon bombings Monday. (FBI)

This photo released Friday, April 19, 2013 by the Federal Bureau of Investigation shows a suspect that officials identified as Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, being sought by police in the Boston Marathon bombings Monday. (FBI)

Here & Now host Robin Young’s nephew is a close friend and former classmate of Tsarnaev’s. Both attended Cambridge Rindge and Latin School, a public high school in Cambridge, Mass.

“This is nothing that we’d even expect,” Robin’s nephew Zolan said. He added that Tsarnaev was a “student-athlete.”

Tsarnaev was a guest at Robin’s house in 2011 for a prom party she hosted for her nephew and his friends before their senior prom.

“I distinctly remember him,” Robin Young said, noting that neither she, nor her nephew, recognized the young man from the FBI photos released Thursday evening (see below). “He’s changed quite a bit … he’s much slimmer now, much more pointed features.”

Hear the interview on WBUR with Robin and her nephew:

A photo of "Suspect 2" released Thursday evening by the FBI. The suspect has since been identified as Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. (FBI)

A photo of “Suspect 2″ released Thursday evening by the FBI. The suspect has since been identified as Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. (FBI)

Law enforcement officials and the uncle of the suspects say the man who was killed in a gun battle with police in Massachusetts overnight is Tamerlan Tsarnaev, the older brother of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

The uncle, Ruslan Tsarni of Montgomery Village, Md., told The Associated Press that the men lived together near Boston and have been in the United States for about a decade. They traveled here together from the Russian region near Chechnya.

The chaotic violence that occurred overnight began with a robbery, the fatal shooting of a MIT police officer and a stolen car chase.

Police officers traced the suspects from Cambridge to Watertown, amid reports of further gunfire and explosions.

“We believe this to be a terrorist,” Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis said of the surviving suspect, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.


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