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Monday, February 4, 2013

Super Bowl Ads: Winners And Losers

When you dish out nearly $4 million to air a 30-second spot during the Super Bowl, you’d better deliver the goods.

USA Today’s “ad meter” says the best advertisement Sunday night was Budweiser’s story of a Clydesdale horse (see video above).

What are your picks for best and worst ads? Let us know in the comments or join the debate on our Facebook page.

Here are some of the ads we talk about with Here & Now media analyst John Carroll:

“Space Babies” Kia Sorento ad:

“Farmer” Ram Trucks ad:

“Whole Again” Jeep ad:

“Viva Young” Taco Bell ad:

“Whisper Fight” Oreo ad:

“Miracle Stain” Tide ad:

The unaired SodaStream ad:

The SodaStream ad that did air:

Guest:


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Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

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February 24 6 Comments

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Jobs Growing In City Centers, Shrinking In Suburban Areas

A decades-long trend has reversed. As more people move to city centers, employers are moving with them.