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Monday, January 28, 2013

Tide Detergent Is Hot Commodity For Thieves

Procter & Gamble's Tide detergent is displayed at a Target store in Richmond, Va. (Steve Helber/AP)

Procter & Gamble’s Tide detergent is displayed at a Target store in Richmond, Va. (Steve Helber/AP)

Have you heard about the Tide detergent thefts?

At first it was thought to be urban myth, but last year for the first time, Tide made the National Retail Federation’s list of most targeted items for theft.

On the street it’s called “liquid gold.” Among the most expensive detergents, a 150-ounce bottle of Tide sells for around $20.

Sgt. Aubrey Thompson is head of the special unit in Maryland’s Prince George’s County dealing with organized retail theft.

He told Here & Now that thieves have been stealing the detergent from large chain stores and selling it at a bargain price to smaller corner stores.

There have also been reports of Tide being used as currency to buy drugs.

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Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

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