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Thursday, December 6, 2012

CIA, Pentagon Missions Increasingly Blurred

The CIA seal on the lobby floor of the agency’s headquarters, left, and a view of the Pentagon taken in December 2000 by Space Imaging’s IKONOS satellite. (cia.gov, SpaceImaging.com/AP)

The Central Intelligence Agency is supposed to do the nation’s spying but the line between the CIA and the Pentagon is increasingly blurry.

The Pentagon is assembling an espionage network that will rival the spooks who operate out of CIA headquarters in Langley, Va.

This effort reflects President Barack Obama’s affinity for covert action over conventional force, and the changing nature of the threats against the U.S. since the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

Meantime, CIA drones now account for the majority of deadly U.S. operations outside the Afghan war zone, according to The Washington Post.

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Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

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