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Friday, October 5, 2012

Protesters Take To The Streets Over Drones In Pakistan

A U.S. Predator unmanned drone armed with a missile stands on the tarmac of Kandahar military airport in Afghanistan in June 2010. (AP)

A U.S. Predator unmanned drone armed with a missile stands in Afghanistan in June 2010. (AP)

There are protests today in Pakistan over those controversial U.S. drone strikes in the tribal areas on the border with Afghanistan. The U.S. says the drones are targeting militants, but critics say they are also killing hundreds of civilians. Pakistan says the drone attacks are illegal, counter-productive and a violation of its sovereignty. The BBC’s Orla Guerin reports.


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  • It

    Thanks to the BBC for doing this story. People tend to think drones are the easy answer. All we hear about is the bad guy that got killed and no US soldiers had to die or even be put in danger. These attacks do have a cost in innocent lives paid by real people.

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