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Wednesday, September 12, 2012

U.S. Ambassador Killed In Libya Attack

U.S. Ambassador to Libya J. Christopher Stevens in an official portrait. (AP/U.S. State Department)

Libyan officials say the U.S. ambassador to their country and three other American staff members were killed in the attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, by protesters angry over a film ridiculing Islam’s Prophet Muhammad.

The Libyan officials said Ambassador Chris Stevens died Tuesday night when he and a group of embassy employees went to the consulate to try to evacuate staff, as the building came under attack by a mob carrying guns and rocket-propelled grenades.

Egyptians have also protested the film by American-Israeli film maker Sam Bacile, storming the U.S. embassy in Cairo hours before the Libyan attacks.

Guests:

  • Julian Barnes, reporter for The Wall Street Journal
  • Christopher Dickey, Paris Bureau Chief for Newsweek. He also writes for the Daily Beast

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Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

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