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Here and Now with Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson
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Friday, August 24, 2012

Surviving A Jump To End It All

Hanns Jones survived a jump off Florida’s Sunshine Skyway Bridge. (Photo: Rich Halten)

Next week Here & Now will broadcast from Tampa, Fla., where, weather permitting, the Republican Party will hold its convention.

And in addition to political coverage, we’ll have stories about the city. And we start with one about the legacy of the Sunshine Skyway Bridge.

It’s a beautiful structure that, for nearly four miles, spans the mouth of Tampa Bay. The bridge is also the No. 1 place east of California that people go — to end their life.

Some drive from as far away as Minnesota to take the plunge. Since it opened in 1987, an estimated 241 people have attempted suicide from the bridge. Producer Rich Halten brings us the story of one lucky man, Hanns Jones, who jumped — and survived.

Florida’s Sunshine Skyway Bridge. (Photo Rich Halten)


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Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

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