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Monday, August 20, 2012

‘Wicked Bugs:’ From World’s Most Painful Hornet To Disease-Carrying Flies

Scabies Mite (Copyright Briony Morrow-Cri​bbs, from the book "Wicked Bugs," courtesy of Algonquin Books)

Scabies Mite (Copyright Briony Morrow-Cri​bbs, from the book “Wicked Bugs,” courtesy of Algonquin Books)

An Illinois man died from complications of the West Nile Virus this past weekend. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that this year’s outbreak is one of the worst in over ten years. West Nile is spread through the bite of the mosquito, as is malaria and eastern equine encephalitis.

Author Amy Stewart considers the mosquito the most wicked bug of all because of the amount of disease it spreads. Stewart is author of “Wicked Bugs: The Louse that Conquered Napoleon’s Army and other Diabolical Insects.”

This segment originally aired in 2011.


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Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

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