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Thursday, July 26, 2012

‘Shatterer Of Glass-Steagall’ Does About Face

Sandy Weill speaking on CNBC.

New York Magazine’s Kevin Roose writes that Sanford Weill is the godfather of the “too-big-to-fail” movement. As Citigroup chief, now retired, Weill once described himself as the “shatterer of Glass-Steagall” — a regulation that prohibited commercial banks from doing risky investments in order to keep depositors’ money safe and was repealed in the 90s.

Weill and other big bankers pushed the repeal so that their banks could grow into the behemoths they are today. But Wednesday on CNBC, Weill announced he had had a change of heart and supports separating investment banks from commercial ones.

“What we should probably do is split up investment banking from banking, have banks be deposit takers… have banks do something that’s not going to risk tax payer dollars, that’s not going to be too big to fail,” Weill said on CNBC.

Guest:

  • Kevin Roose, New York Magazine

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Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

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