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Monday, May 14, 2012

Is Parenting Out Of Control?

(Courtesy Time magazine)

The Time magazine cover showing a mother breastfeeding her 3-year-old has captured the attention of everyone from parent bloggers to Saturday Night Live.

But what has gone unnoticed is the serious discussion inside the magazine, on “attachment parenting,” and its biggest champions, Dr. William Sears and his wife Martha.

They wrote “The Baby Book” 20 years ago, and as Time magazine reports, attachment parenting has grown so much in popularity that it has shifted mainstream ideas from raising self-sufficient kids to a style that’s more about parental devotion and sacrifice.

The science is still out over whether that’s better for the kids, but researcher Margaret Nelson also wonders how it impacts parents.

Do you practice attachment parenting? Tell us why or why not in our comments section or at Facebook.com/hereandnowradio.

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Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

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