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Monday, March 26, 2012

Supreme Court Begins Health Care Reform Arguments

At issue Monday is whether the case can even go forward in the Supreme Court. (AP)

Twenty-six states and a record 136 organizations, including the Montana Shooting Sports Association, filed briefs against President Obama’s landmark 2010 law to reform health care.

The Obama administration and groups such as the Washington and Lee University Black Lung Clinic have filed in favor. At issue Monday is whether the case can even go forward.

But also, as the Washington Post puts it, it’s an opportunity for the court to “cut loose,” because the Roberts court, under Chief Justice John Roberts, is known as a hot bench, meaning they are unusually chatty with the exception of Clarence Thomas, who hasn’t spoken a word since 2006.

Guest:

  • N.C. Aizenman, Washington Post reporter

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Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

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