90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW
Here and Now with Robin Young
Public radio's live
midday news program
With sponsorship from
Mathworks - Accelerating the pace of engineering and science
Accelerating the pace
of engineering and science
Thursday, March 22, 2012

High School Hosts Its Own Hunger Games

Bristol Eastern High School librarian Janet Kenney(right), dressed as the Hunger Games character, Effie Trinkett, as she presented eleventh grader, Chantel, with roses for winning the school's Hunger Games reenactment. (Brisol Eastern High School)

Bristol Eastern High School librarian Janet Kenney (right), dressed as the Hunger Games character, Effie Trinkett, as she presented eleventh grader, Chantel, with roses for winning the school's Hunger Games reenactment. (Bristol Eastern High School)

Pink hair – check. Outrageous clothes – check. Fight to the death match – not so much.

Students at Bristrol Eastern High School in Bristol, Conn. are ardent Hunger Games fans, but their recent reenactment of the popular novels by Suzanne Collins stopped short of physical violence.

School librarian Janet Kenney came up with the idea for the school to host its own Hunger Games to celebrate the books, in anticipation of the film debut this week.

In the books, heroine Katniss Everdeen becomes one of 24 tributes forced to take part in a fight to the death reality TV match.  At Bristol Eastern High School, Kenney drew the “tributes” from a pool of student volunteers. She even dressed up as Effie Trinket, the many-hued representative of the repressive Capitol, to add some flare to the event.

Kenney said the students faced physical, mental and artistic challenges, and they tried to stay true to several plot points (without the violence).

“We had a cornucopia filled with backpacks with random supplies,” Kenney told Here & Now’s Robin Young. The students were then challenged to build their own sling shots and they practiced shooting at a picture of the book’s villian, President Snow.

Kenney said she thinks the books hook so many readers because of the personal connections they make, not because of the violence.

“It’s more about the emotions of Katniss and the feelings she has about her family,” Kenney said. “I think everyone can relate to that.”

The winner was an 11th grader named Chantel. She received a dozen roses, a $25 gift card to the movies and the admiration of her fellow students.

But Kenney said the most rewarding part was getting kids excited about books.

“They got a real comraderie in sharing a book the way they normally share about movies or music or the latest YouTube video,” Kenney said. “They’re all sharing and united over a book. And that to me, as a librarian, is fabulous.”

Guest:

  • Janet Kenney, librarian at Bristol Eastern High School in Bristol, Connecticut

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

October 17 Comment

Toll Lanes: Coming Soon To Almost Every Major City In Florida

Reporting by the Florida Center for Investigative Reporting found the toll lanes are developed without much public input, and without reliable knowledge of the cost.

October 17 Comment

USAID: Challenges And Small Victories In Liberia

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more than 4,500 people in the region with an estimated 8,900 more people currently infected.

October 16 4 Comments

Kathy Gunst Thinks Fall Greens

Now that summer has turned to fall, we start bidding adieu to the summer corn and say hello to fall greens.

October 16 Comment

‘Alternate Routes': Tradition And Change In Utah

Rachel Rohr's dispatches from Utah, where young people are confronting same-sex marriage and other conflicts between change and tradition.