PLEDGE NOW
Here and Now with Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson
Public radio's live
midday news program
With sponsorship from
Mathworks - Accelerating the pace of engineering and science
Accelerating the pace
of engineering and science
Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Shooting Prompts Neighborhood Watch Groups’ Soul Searching

Trayvon Martin poses for a family photo. (AP)

The fatal shooting of 17 year-old Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Florida, by neighborhood watch captain George Zimmerman, has raised questions among neighborhood groups across the country.

“This is a guy who does not strike me as someone who should have been a neighborhood watch captain, and worse he’s running around with a 9 milimeter gun,” said Eric Resnick, a former neighborhood watch coordinator in Canton, Ohio.

Zimmerman was arrested in 2005 for battery on a law enforcement officer and is on record for calling the police 46 times since Jan. 1, 2011, “to report disturbances, break-ins, windows left open and other incidents. Nine of those times, he saw someone or something suspicious,” according to The Miami Herald.

‘More Testosterone Than Brains’

“There are people in all of our communities who have more testosterone than brains. Some of those people are going to be attracted to neighborhood watch, like pedofiles are attracted to playgrounds,” Resnick said. “Nowhere in what we were doing was there any warning.. any training, any formal attempts to discourage people who might be inappropriate from taking part in this.”

Chris Tutko, the director of the National Neighborhood Watch program, told ABC News that there are about 22,000 registered watch groups nationwide, and Zimmerman was not part of a registered group.

Carmen Caldwell, executive director of Citizens’ Crime Watch of Miami-Dade County, says that many members of these informal groups are not trained properly.

“That’s the unfortunate thing that in many communities you have people that say ‘We have neighborhood watch.’ Okay, who’s leading it, who’s doing the training?” she said.

Florida’s ‘Stand Your Ground’ Law

Zimmerman claims he was defending himself under Florida’s  “Stand Your Ground” law, which allows people to protect themselves with force outside the home.

Now State Senator Oscar Braynon is calling for hearings on that law.

Trayvon Martin was walking home after buying a pack of Skittles when Zimmerman began following him despite being told by a 911 dispatcher not to.

Zimmerman has not been arrested, which has led to protests by student groups in Florida.

The federal government is now investigating the case.

Guests:

  • Eric Resnick, a former neighborhood watch coordinator in Canton, Ohio for a Justice Department called Weed and Seed that has since been defunded
  • Carmen Caldwell, executive director of Citizens’ Crime Watch of Miami-Dade County

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

July 30 35 Comments

Oxford Conservationist Talks About 7 Years Of Tracking Cecil

The 13-year-old lion was not only a tourist favorite, but also, a research animal. The beloved lion was being studied by the Oxford University Conservation Unit.

July 30 27 Comments

NAACP To Begin 860-Mile ‘Journey For Justice’ March

The march, which will travel from Selma, Ala. to Washington, seeks to highlight vulnerable communities subject to regressive voting rights.

July 29 2 Comments

Garden-Inspired Cooking With Kathy Gunst

We visit our resident chef's garden in Maine, make gazpacho and get a recipe for a plum tart with hazelnut crust.

July 29 655 Comments

Two Sides Of The GMO Debate

We moderate a debate over a bill that would bar states from forcing food manufacturers to label genetically modified foods.