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Wednesday, November 16, 2011

Reckless Teen Behavior May Be Evolutionary Advantage

(Flickr/eskimo_jo)

When you think of teenagers, words like “responsible” or “careful” probably aren’t the first to come to mind. Teens often drive fast, experiment with drugs, don’t get enough sleep, and seem to only care about hanging out with their friends.

But new research about teens’ brains shows that their hunger for risk may be a trait that has evolved over time to help them succeed at such a tumultuous time in their lives.

Science reporter David Dobbs says that during teenage years there are three traits that are at their peak: A taste for risk, a desire for novelty and a need to be around their same-aged peers.

“Those are all traits that are tremendously useful to humanity, essential to our success,” he told Here & Now‘s Robin Young.

“If you look at the task we face at that age, which is to move from the safety of home and out into the world into a bunch of unknowns, that’s the scariest, hardest thing we do in our lives. So you would need tremendous motivation– and that’s what the taste for risk-taking and the desire for novelty and same-aged peers provides,” he said.

Dobbs is careful to point out that these traits are not all good. As Dobbs puts it in his article, young people between 15-25 die “of accidents of almost every sort at high rates.”

“When we say something is adaptive from an evolutionary point of view, it does not mean it’s always good. It means it’s good more often than it’s bad,” he said.

Guest:

  • David Dobbs, science writer for National Geographic

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  • Lucy Johnston

    This is wonderful since I have an eighteen year old son who is keeping me on my toes, exploring risks and novelty and other exciting things.  A great reminder for a good perspective!  Thanks.

  • Anonymous

    The other evolutionary advantage is that it thins the herd before breeding.

    • hipsterscientist

      mmm careful John, remember evolution always acts on the individual, not the group.

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Tony-Jack/1415761122 Tony Jack

        Well if dumb individuals are taken out before they reproduce, then that leaves the more intelligent members left to reproduce, which create a more intelligent group.

  • Mike

    Do the kids leave the nest (village, tribe) in all cultures?  Or is this just an American thing, where we’ve had the open land to leave the nest and move out west.  It looks to me that in most places around the world, the kids don’t move far away, because there’s no place to go.

  • Wilson

    “Can’t it wait till I get old? Can I live while I’m young?….I must inquire Wilson….Can you still have any fun!?”

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