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Thursday, January 20, 2011

House GOP Shifts Focus From ‘Repeal’ To ‘Replace’

House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio walks through Statuary Hall on Capitol Hill in Washington, after the vote passed to repeal the health care bill. (AP)

House Republicans voted yesterday in favor of a bill to repeal President Obama’s healthcare reform law by a vote of 245 to 189. Since Senate Democrats and the president are both firmly against repeal, the repeal bill is unlikely to become law.

Now GOP leaders move onto phase two of their strategy: replace the parts of the healthcare act they dislike the most. Amy Goldstein, national social policy reporter for the Washington Post, tells us what Republicans hope to strip out of the law first, and their plans to enact their own healthcare legislation.


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  • Private Sector Frog

    This is from Paul Ryan’s website about his suggested reform of medicare:

    http://paulryan.house.gov/Issues/Issue/?IssueID=9969

    “For younger people, Medicare is reformed to work like the health care plan Members of Congress now enjoy. For those currently under 55—as they become Medicare-eligible—it creates a Medicare payment, initially averaging $11,000, to be used to purchase a Medicare certified plan. The payment is adjusted to reflect the impact of medical inflation, and pegged to income, with low-income individuals receiving greater support. The plan also provides risk adjustment mechanisms, allowing those with greater medical needs receive a higher payment…”

    That doesn’t really sound like what you described on the show.

Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

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