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Wednesday, January 5, 2011

NYT's David Carr Says Tablets Could Save Long-Form Journalism

The new Samsung Galaxy Tab, a tablet computer to compete with the Apple iPad. (AP)

The new Samsung Galaxy Tab, a tablet computer to compete with the Apple iPad. (AP)

As many as 80 rivals to the iPad are expected to debut over the next few days at the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. Until Apple sold millions of iPads, the devices were best known for failing in the marketplace.

We speak with New York Times business columnist and culture reporter David Carr who says that this new wave of tablets, led by the iPad, restore the pleasure of reading and are now the reliable wingmen to long-form journalism.


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  • One Private-sector Frog

    I thought it was interesting what apps NY Times columnist Mr. Carr was putting on his 87 year old father’s IPAD…”BBC, NPR, Huffington Post” Quite the diverse set of information sources.

Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

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