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Nation
July 7, 2015 Comment

Why Some Cities Are Better For Minorities Than Others

A new study finds that Florida’s largest city, Jacksonville, is the most welcoming to Latinos in the U.S.

July 7, 2015 Comment

Louisville’s New Minimum Wage Could Have An Impact Across The South

Until now, the recent wave of minimum wage increases had eluded the southern United States.

July 7, 2015 Comment

Skanska Construction CEO Says U.S. Infrastructure ‘In Crying Need Of Repair’

In our latest View From The Top conversation, we look at U.S. infrastructure and the state of the construction business.

July 6, 2015 Comment

Reforesting After Fracking: Working To Restore Pennsylvania’s Drilled Land

State regulators in Pennsylvania are working on a less-discussed, but no less serious, side effect of oil and gas development: forest fragmentation.

July 6, 2015 31 Comments

Andrew Bacevich On Iraq, ISIS

Is the recent surge of ISIS tied to decisions made by Barack Obama?

July 6, 2015 2 Comments

A Look At What’s Coming Up This Week In American Politics

Where do nuclear talks with Iran stand and what legislation will Congress take up when they return from recess tomorrow?

July 6, 2015 15 Comments

5-Time Deported Mexican Immigrant Admits To Killing

The seemingly random killing of a woman at a popular San Francisco tourist spot is stirring up debate about how to deal with undocumented workers in the U.S.

July 6, 2015 5 Comments

The Rise Of The MP3 And The Fall Of The CD

Stephen Witt discusses his book “How Music Got Free: The End of an Industry, The Turn of the Century, and the Patient Zero of Privacy.”

July 3, 2015 Comment

Kids Books Feature Famous Figures As Children

Brad Meltzer is known for his political thrillers, but he also writes kids books about real-life people like Rosa Parks and Amelia Earhart.

July 3, 2015 2 Comments

John Adams Wanted Independence Day On July 2, Not July 4

The Founding Father believed July 2, 1776, was the really the big day – the day the Continental Congress voted for independence.

July 3, 2015 Comment

A Cherished Synagogue Prepares To Close

After serving the Jewish community in Revere, Massachusetts, for 103 years, Congregation Tifereth Israel is closing.

July 3, 2015 4 Comments

FBI Issues Terror Alert Ahead Of July 4th Holiday Weekend

Seth Jones of the International Security and Defense Policy Center at Rand, discusses why law enforcement issued the alert.

July 3, 2015 Comment

Not Your Typical Summer Reading List

NPR Books editor Petra Mayer and Cleveland poet and bookstore owner R. A. Washington share their picks.

July 3, 2015 Comment

A New Look At America’s Founding

Historian Joseph Ellis’s latest book takes us beyond the Declaration of Independence, to what happened after the war ended.

July 3, 2015 Comment

Two Years After Arizona’s Deadliest Fire, A Small Town Continues To Heal

The tiny town of Yarnell, about 80 miles north of Phoenix, was so devastated by the fire, people wondered if it would ever recover.

July 2, 2015 3 Comments

How The ‘Modern Family Effect’ Is Changing Public Opinion About Gay Rights

NPR TV critic Eric Deggans explains how Hollywood has changed the way Americans think about gay relationships.

July 2, 2015 11 Comments

Professor Says Jefferson Davis Statue Should Be Removed, Preserved

At the University of Texas at Austin, there are calls to take down a statue of the Confederate president on campus.

July 2, 2015 7 Comments

Race For 2016: Christie Enters Race, Clinton Raises $45 Million

We discuss the latest in the presidential race with NPR’s Domenico Montanaro and American Urban Radio Networks’ April Ryan.

July 2, 2015 5 Comments

U.S. Economy Adds 223,000 Jobs In June, But Wages Were Flat

Unemployment dropped to 5.3 percent, but while the overall report was positive, there were some cloudy signs.

July 2, 2015 2 Comments

Supreme Court Term Wraps With Some Strong Language

NPR’s legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg discusses the landmark decisions this term, and what they say about this court.

Spotlight

From controversial new textbooks to a Maverick family reunion, here are stories from Jeremy Hobson's week in Houston and San Antonio.

Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

July 6 31 Comments

Andrew Bacevich On Iraq, ISIS

Is the recent surge of ISIS tied to decisions made by Barack Obama?

July 6 5 Comments

The Rise Of The MP3 And The Fall Of The CD

Stephen Witt discusses his book "How Music Got Free: The End of an Industry, The Turn of the Century, and the Patient Zero of Privacy."

July 3 Comment

Kids Books Feature Famous Figures As Children

Brad Meltzer is known for his political thrillers, but he also writes kids books about real-life people like Rosa Parks and Amelia Earhart.

July 3 Comment

Not Your Typical Summer Reading List

NPR Books editor Petra Mayer and Cleveland poet and bookstore owner R. A. Washington share their picks.