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Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Modern-Day Dust Bowl Isn’t Easy, But It Beats The 1930s

Farmer John Schweiser, 80, has had to take shelter from recent dust storms. He also lived through the Dust Bowl in the 1930s. (Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media)

Farmer John Schweiser, 80, has had to take shelter from recent dust storms. He also lived through the Dust Bowl in the 1930s. (Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media)

The historic drought that continues to hammer the West shows no signs off abating. Most of California remains in severe drought conditions, with its groundwater aquifers in danger of being depleted. Officials in Los Angeles have beefed up their use of “water cops” to make sure people aren’t wasting water.

Meanwhile, in the plains and on the panhandle, it’s been drier than it was during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s. And yet, many farmers are surviving. From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Luke Runyon of Harvest Public Media traveled to some drought-stricken farms to find out why.

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Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

September 18 Comment

Terry Gilliam Goes Back To The Dystopian Future

Terry Gilliam's new film, "The Zero Theorem" will be familiar to his fans.

September 18 5 Comments

DJ Sessions: Kansas’ ‘Retro Cocktail Hour’

"Space age pop" and "incredibly strange music" are the songs of the day on this installment of the DJ Sessions.

September 17 21 Comments

Volkswagen’s 300 MPG Car

The XL-1 can get 300 miles per gallon. The key is reducing wind resistance.

September 17 40 Comments

How Has The Obesity Epidemic Disrupted Romance?

The health impacts of the obesity epidemic are well-documented. Less studied are its ramifications for romance.