90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW
Here and Now with Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson
Public radio's live
midday news program
With sponsorship from
Mathworks - Accelerating the pace of engineering and science
Accelerating the pace
of engineering and science
Friday, August 1, 2014

Border Vigilante Calls Attention To Adults Entering U.S. Illegally

Michael Vickers, co-founder of Texas Border Volunteers, sent us this photo of a checkpoint near his home, where the tally of immigrants apprehended at the border is posted on a sign. (Courtesy of Michael Vickers)

Michael Vickers, co-founder of Texas Border Volunteers, sent us this photo of a checkpoint near his home, where the tally of immigrants apprehended at the border is posted on a sign. (Courtesy of Michael Vickers)

Most of the 57,000 or so unaccompanied and undocumented Central American minors who’ve come to the U.S. in the last 10 months present themselves to Customs and Border Protection officers at the U.S.-Mexico border. They want to be taken in, in the hopes that they will be reunited with family members in the U.S.

But 70 miles north of the border, in Brooks County, Texas, many residents feel they’re living on another border. They say adult migrants have made it to their property, and they don’t want to be caught. They claim they’re trying to cross through ranches to try to avoid government checkpoints.

A helicopter kicks up dust as a U.S. Border Patrol agent apprehends an undocumented immigrant who had collapsed after running from agents on July 25 near Falfurrias, Texas. Tens of thousands of illegal immigrants have crossed into the U.S. this year, causing a humanitarian crisis on the U.S.-Mexico border. Texas' Rio Grande Valley has become the epicenter of the latest immigrant crisis, as more Central Americans have crossed illegally from Mexico into that sector than any other stretch of America's 1,933 mile border with Mexico. (John Moore/Getty Images)

A helicopter kicks up dust as a U.S. Border Patrol agent apprehends an undocumented immigrant who had collapsed after running from agents on July 25 near Falfurrias, Texas. (John Moore/Getty Images)

Ranchers say this illegal immigration is going unreported while the attention shifts to kids, and those ranchers are taking matters into their own hands.

Michael Vickers is a rancher and veterinarian in Falfurrias, Texas. He and his wife, Linda, co-founded the Texas Border Volunteers. Members of this group look for people who cross the border illegally, and then report them to the Border Patrol.

Vickers joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to explain why he founded the organization and its importance today.

Guest


Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
Spotlight

Here & Now resident chef and cookbook author Kathy Gunst shares her list of the best cookbooks of the year.

Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

December 18 Comment

College Counselor: ‘A Deferral Is Not A Denial’

Lisa Micele shares tips for applying to college — especially for students who have been deferred under early decision.

December 18 15 Comments

America’s Political Dynasties

Americans under 38 have only experienced one presidential election that did not involve a Bush or a Clinton.

December 17 2 Comments

Atticus Lish’s ‘Preparation For The Next Life’

The author's debut novel centers on an unlikely romance between an Iraq veteran and a Uyghur from China.

December 17 3 Comments

Diagnosing Ear Infections With Your Smartphone

The CellScope Oto is a clip-on gadget that turns a smartphone into an otoscope — the tool doctors use to check out a patient's eardrum.