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Monday, July 21, 2014

Another Facet Of The Jobs Debate: Baby Boomers

Participation in the workforce has dropped significantly since 2007, and economists say more than half of the dropouts may never return. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Participation in the workforce has dropped significantly since 2007, and economists say more than half of the dropouts may never return. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

A strong economy naturally depends on a large portion of the population earning money and sending it back into the economy. But the U.S. labor force has been shrinking since 2007, and according to a report by the White House Council of Economic Advisers, this is because baby boomers are reaching retirement age.

But critics disagree, saying that the weak economy has forced baby boomers to work longer to support their families. NPR’s Marilyn Geewax discusses the report and what it means for the economy with Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti.

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Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

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