PLEDGE NOW
Here and Now with Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson
Public radio's live
midday news program
With sponsorship from
Mathworks - Accelerating the pace of engineering and science
Accelerating the pace
of engineering and science
Monday, January 20, 2014

Dorothea Lange From Her Goddaughter’s Perspective

photo
Dorothea Lange is pictured atop an automobile in California. (Rondal Partridge/Farm Security Administration via Library of Congress)Oklahoma Child with Cotton Sack Ready to Go into the Field, 7 A.M., California, 1936. Library of Congress. (From "Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning," by Elizabeth Partridge. Published by Chronicle Books, 2013.)Cotton Hoer-Worked from 6 A.M. to 7 P.M. for One Dollar, near Clarksdale, Mississippi, 1937. Library of Congress. (From "Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning," by Elizabeth Partridge. Published by Chronicle Books, 2013.)Bitsie and Dorothea, 1961. (From "Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning," by Elizabeth Partridge. Published by Chronicle Books, 2013.)Enforcement of Executive Order 9066. Japanese Children Made to Wear Identification Tags, Hayward, California, 1942. Oakland Museum of California. (From "Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning," by Elizabeth Partridge. Published by Chronicle Books, 2013.)Dorothea Lange and the Zeiss Jewell Camera, 1937. Photo by Rondal Partridge. (From "Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning," by Elizabeth Partridge. Published by Chronicle Books, 2013.)Migrant Mother, Nipomo, San Luis Obispo County, California, 1936. Library of Congress. (From "Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning," by Elizabeth Partridge. Published by Chronicle Books, 2013.)Two Women, Egypy, 1963. Oakland Museum of California. (From "Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning," by Elizabeth Partridge. Published by Chronicle Books, 2013.)Cover of "Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning," by Elizabeth Partridge. Published by Chronicle Books, 2013.Elizabeth Partridge is author of "Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning." (Courtesy)

Dorothea Lange’s photos, in particular her 1936 photo “Migrant Mother,” brought attention to the plight of migrant workers during the Great Depression. But as a new coffee table book reminds us, her career covered so much more.

Migrant Mother, Nipomo, San Luis Obispo County, California, 1936. Library of Congress. (From "Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning," by Elizabeth Partridge. Published by Chronicle Books, 2013.)

Migrant Mother, Nipomo, San Luis Obispo County, California, 1936. Library of Congress. (From “Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning,” by Elizabeth Partridge. Published by Chronicle Books, 2013.)

Dorothea Lange took photos of sharecroppers in the south and Japanese-Americans interned by the U.S. government during World War II. Later, she would take photos in Indonesia, Egypt and Nepal.

Elizabeth Partridge, Lange’s goddaughter amassed the photos and wrote the text for “Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning.” Though Dorothea Lange died when Elizabeth Partridge was 14, she has vivid memories of her godmother.

“I was always a little afraid of her, because the closer you were to her, the more likely you were to come in for her trying to make you the best you could be,” she tells Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti.

She also recalls Lange’s way of seeing the world: “She did have a powerful gaze, actually. But it wasn’t that she was translating you into a photo, particularly. She took in the entire world with that gaze. I mean she was so visual, everything — clothes flapping on a line, somebody gardening, incredible issues of social justice that she saw — that all went in through her eyes to her heart.”

Guest


Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

May 26 4 Comments

As Lethal Heroin Overdose Numbers Rise, Families Find Solace In Organ Donation

Organ banks around the country have noted an increasing number of organs from donors who have died of overdoses.

May 26 3 Comments

NEADS Assistance Dog Bailey Graduates From Service Dog Training

NEADS provides dogs like Bailey, a yellow Labrador, for deaf and disabled Americans.

May 25 Comment

Celebrating The Class Of 2016: Peace Odiase

Odiase is one of two valedictorians at Fisk University, a historically black college in Nashville, Tennessee.

May 25 8 Comments

NEADS Service Dog Meets His Match

Here & Now has been tracking service dog Bailey, who recently met his new owner, since last year.