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Thursday, January 2, 2014

Antarctic Explorer’s Failure Becomes His Greatest Success

photo
Recently recovered cellulose photos recovered by the New Zealand Antarctic Heritage Trust. Pictured, Iceberg and land, Ross Island. (New Zealand Antarctic Heritage Trust)Recently recovered cellulose photos recovered by the New Zealand Antarctic Heritage Trust. Pictured, Ernest Shackleton's 1907-1909 base. (New Zealand Antarctic Heritage Trust)Sir Ernest Shackleton watching a lead forming, 1915, photographed by Frank Hurley. (State Library of New South Wales/Flickr)Recently recovered cellulose photos recovered by the New Zealand Antarctic Heritage Trust. Pictured, looking south along Hut Point Peninsula. (New Zealand Antarctic Heritage Trust)Th ship, "The Endurance" got stuck in Antarctic ice for 15 months. Pictured, A mid-winter glow on the Weddell Sea surrounds The Endurance in 1915. (Frank Hurley/State Library of New South Wales via Flickr)

A helicopter has rescued all 52 passengers from a research ship that’s been trapped in Antarctic ice since Christmas Eve.

The group was stuck in the ice for 10 days, but imagine being stuck there for 15 months – with no communication with the outside world.

That’s what happened to Irish explorer Ernest Shackleton and his team in their attempt to make a land crossing of Antarctica in 1914.

Their ship got stuck in the ice, and they never reached their goal. But that journey is now remembered for Shackleton’s journey to rescue his crew.

Moshe Cohen teaches leadership at Boston University’s Graduate School of Business, and joins Here & Now’Robin Young to explain why Shackleton’s actions in 1914 serve as a model of true leadership.

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