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Wednesday, December 25, 2013

Taking On The Menacing Stink Bug

The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug has been causing trouble for homeowners and farmers from New Hampshire to California. (rutgers.edu)

The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug has been causing trouble for homeowners and farmers from New Hampshire to California. (rutgers.edu)

The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug has been causing trouble for homeowners and farmers from New Hampshire to California for three years.

The inch-long pest looks like a little brown shield. It can eat more than one hundred different crops, from soybeans to apples.

No predators are eating the invasive species fast enough to keep it under control. NPR’s Alan Yu reports there may be a solution.

Reporter


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  • GoodFruitGrower

    Thanks for reporting on this important issue. I am a young fruit grower, and this new bug, along with spotted wing drosophila, is causing huge damage in our orchards. Our profit margin is already very thin. If people want fresh local food, we’ll need to find ways to handle this pest.

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Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

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