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Friday, December 20, 2013

Critics Take Aim As More Health Law Rules Relaxed

(J. David Ake/AP)

People whose health insurance policies were canceled under the new health law will now be able to claim a “hardship exemption” and avoid tax penalties. (J. David Ake/AP)

Insurers are criticizing a surprise move last night by the Obama administration to relax rules for people whose health insurance policies were canceled. Those people have struggled to find new plans before the Jan. 1 deadline to be insured or be fined under the Affordable Care Act.

Those people will now temporarily be able to claim a “hardship exemption,” and — regardless of their age — they have the choice of buying bare-bones catastrophic coverage health plans, or they can choose to remain uninsured without being fined.

A dedicated hotline for people who got cancellations, 1-866-837-0677, is being set up by the Health and Human Services Department.

Guest


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  • Frog

    Why even have laws?

    Now we find another loophole in the ACA the press and politicians didn’t tell us about (did they even know?)….the “hardship” loophole. That’s the all-powerful loophole that lets the President exempt ANYONE HE WANTS for HOWEVER LONG HE WANTS from the individual mandate. This year angry voters who got their insurance cancelled will be exempted from the individual mandate until
    AFTER the 2014 elections. How convenient.

    Ezra Klein eviscerates the logic of why these individuals should be singled out:

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/12/19/the-obama-administration-just-delayed-the-individual-mandate-for-people-whose-plans-have-been-canceled/

    “Put more simply, Republicans will immediately begin calling for the uninsured to get this same exemption. What will the Obama administration say in response? Why are people who plans were canceled more deserving of help than people who couldn’t afford a plan in the first place?”

  • ClaraThomas

    The Obamination Unaffordable Care Tax scam continues.
    This guy will do whatever it takes. Desperate people do desperate things. He has to do something as his poll numbers continue to sag for lying.Keep re-writing the laws as if he was some dictator. Where is the outrage from Congress or the people on this matter?
    Just what will your numbers be at the end of your Hawaiian vacation, Mr. Soetero?
    Surely a hell of a lower than your golf scores.

    • N_Jessen

      This thing has it’s flaws for sure, but I don’t think anyone thought it’d be perfect from the get-go. Whatever I might think of his other policies and his performance on key issues, he’s taking some reasonable steps to ease the transition. Making basic healthcare more accessible, so that fewer people go broke and run up big hospital bills that are passed on to premium paying individuals and businesses, is a big task. A work in progress.

  • it_disqus

    “Laws Rules Relaxed” – It’s good to be the king.

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