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Wednesday, December 18, 2013

USDA Pullout From Mexico Has Economic Consequences

Cattle move up a ramp following inspection in Presidio, Texas. (Lorne Matalon)

Cattle move up a ramp following inspection in Presidio, Texas. (Lorne Matalon/Fronteras Desk)

A little over a year ago, the federal government banned USDA inspectors from entering Mexico at five Texas border crossings to inspect cattle headed to the U.S.

That decision has had a huge economic impact on small border towns in Texas and now cattle producers and border politicians are asking for relief.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Lorne Matalon of Fronteras Desk has the story.

Guest

  • Lorne Matalon, reporter for Fronteras Desk, a public radio collaboration in the Southwest that focuses on the border, immigration and changing demographics. He tweets at @matalon.

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  • Samuel Sitar

    we need nice people to let the inspectors do their jobs.

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