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Thursday, December 5, 2013

Jell-O And Lasers: A New Way To Study Bacteria

Rendering of a bacteria colony confined in a toroid-shaped gelatin "house." (Jason Shear/KUT)

Rendering of a bacteria colony confined in a toroid-shaped gelatin “house.” (Jason Shear/KUT)

When you think of bacteria, you might think of single-celled bugs blindly roaming the world in complete ignorance. But over the years, scientists have found bacteria are much more complicated.

In fact, researchers at the University of Texas in Austin have come up with a new way of studying how bacteria interact with the world, and each other. And it kind of looks like dessert.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Matt Largey of KUT explains.

Reporter


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  • oggie14

    I don’t know who the creative genius is who added sound effects to this fascinating report, but he or she deserves some serious credit for contributing a whole other dimension to the story. Congrats, and let’s have more from this person, and may we have her or his name front and center, please.

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