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Friday, November 8, 2013

‘Les Mis’ Pops Up In Community Theaters Across Country

A scene from the 2012 film "Les Miserables." (Universal Studios)

A scene from the 2012 film “Les Miserables.” (Universal Studios)

“Les Miserables” is one of the most popular musicals in the world. It’s toured 42 countries in 22 languages. The original Broadway production won eight Tony Awards, and the latest film adaptation won three Oscars.

But for actors, roles in productions of Les Mis were hard to find, since the rights have been restricted for regional and community theaters.

That changed this year. Driven by the popularity of the latest movie, the licensing company released the rights, and regional productions have been popping up across the country.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Erin Keane of WFPL has more on a local Les Mis production in Louisville.

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