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Friday, November 1, 2013

Music From The Show

  • “Still Life” by The Horrors
  • “Here Comes the Rain” by The Eurythmics
  • “Eighthundred Streets” by Feet
  • “America” by Laur Veirs
  • “Peace Beneath the City” by Iron and Wine
  • “My Affection” by Danny Malone
  • “Debris” by Blue October
  • “Blues for Yna Yna” by Les McCann
  • “Layla” by Derek and the Dominoes
  • “Universal Traveler” by Air
  • “400 Lux” by Lorde
  • “Your Own Sweet Way” by Notting Hillbillies
  • “Elevate” by St. Lucia
  • “Are You There Margaret” by Baldwin Brothers
  • “Dugout” by Garage a Trois
  • “Inside” by Moby
  • “Fall of 82″ by Shins
  • “Stranger to Himself” by Traffic
  • “Commander” by Steve Jablonsky (off the Ender’s Game soundtrack)

There were also various songs by Trio Ellas in the segment Trio Ellas: Mariachi Meets The Andrews Sisters


Spotlight

Here & Now resident chef and cookbook author Kathy Gunst shares her list of the best cookbooks of the year.

Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

December 24 Comment

Animated Films Become Bridge To Child With Autism

When acclaimed journalist Ron Suskind's son Owen was nearly three years old, he suddenly stopped communicating.

December 24 Comment

International Year In Review      

From the beheading of American journalist James Foley to a massive cyberattack provoked by the upcoming film, "The Interview."

December 23 20 Comments

A Suggestion for A Live Holiday Broadcast: Bring Back Amahl!

Ron Cohen suggests that Gian Carlo Menotti's "Amahl and the Night Visitors!" should make a comeback for the holiday season.

December 23 23 Comments

Do Protests Incite People With Mental Illness?

Although people with mental illness sometimes distort the message of movements, far more are victims of violence rather than perpetrators, says one psychiatrist.