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Friday, September 20, 2013

Same Company Vetted Navy Yard Shooter And Snowden

USIS, a federal contractor based in Falls Church, Va., is drawing fire for its security clearance record.

Aaron Alexis, the Navy Yard shooter, and Edward Snowden, the federal contractor who leaked classified information, were both vetted by USIS.

U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill of Missouri said in a statement, “What’s emerging is a pattern of failure on the part of this company, and a failure of this entire system, that risks nothing less than our national security and the lives of Americans.”

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  • http://profiles.google.com/barry.kort Barry Kort

    I wonder how many elected officials would emerge with a clean bill of mental health.

  • ClaraThomas

    This is another smoke and mirrors story.
    There is no connection between Snowden and Alexis.
    Snowden is a hero, Alexis was a patsy.

    I wonder WHO planted this story for the media to run with it.
    This isn’t the first or last time these tactics will be used.

  • Southern Boy

    I listened with much interest to your piece about USSI. As a former federal employee involved in the security clearance investigation process, I will say that the scope of the investigation for a “secret” clearance, the type held by Alexis, and the “top secret” clearance held by Snowden are not the same. As the interviewee state the secret clearance is granted for 10 years, whereas the top secret is granted for 5 years, at
    which time a reinvestigation of the individual takes place. The secret clearance investigation is not as extensive as that for the top secret clearance, and does not include a medical history check as does the top secret. However, Federal Regulations, DoD regulations, and Navy regulations in the case of Alexis requires the supervisor to suspend the clearance of employees who break the law and display the type of behavior as did Alexis, conduct an investigation, and determine if the individual may continue to hold the clearance. In Alexis’s case, his employer should have suspended his clearance, and had an investigation opened into his behavior.

  • fun bobby

    what? someone with a likely no-bid government contract is not doing a good job? does anyone think they will lose their contract?

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