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Thursday, July 25, 2013

Remembering Faye Hunter Of ‘Let’s Active’

Faye Hunter, the founding bassist of Let's Active. (Facebook)

Faye Hunter, the founding bassist of Let’s Active. (Facebook)

Everybody knows R.E.M. but there were so many other southern bands that played the sort of jangly guitar pop that the boys from Athens, Georgia, made famous.

One of my favorites was Let’s Active, formed by Mitch Easter, Sara Romweber and Faye Hunter in 1981.

Any band that can produce a song like “Every Dog Has His Day” is OK in my book.

Well, Faye Hunter, who played bass and sang in Let’s Active, died on July 21, apparently a suicide.

I had a chance to speak to Mitch Easter about his friend and former band mate:

Funeral services for Faye Hunter will be held tomorrow in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. She was 59.

Let's Active - Waters Part
Let's Active - Blue Line

Guest

  • Mitch Easter, formed the band Let’s Active with Faye Hunter in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

Transcript

JEREMY HOBSON, HOST:

Well, before we take a break, we want to take a moment to remember Faye Hunter. She played bass and sang for the band Let's Active, which she formed with her friend Mitch Easter in North Carolina in the early 1980s.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG)

HOBSON: Let's Active never made it big commercially, but they were influential. They played the kind of guitar-based, jangly pop that R.E.M. would eventually ride to superstardom. Faye Hunter died last Saturday, apparently a suicide. Mitch Easter says what he remembers about her doesn't really have anything to do with being in a band together.

MITCH EASTER: She was definitely an art person. In every possible direction, she was artistic. But every bit as much as that, she was like a deeply kind person. And she was like an animal person, you know? There wasn't a single animal on the face of the Earth that she wouldn't try to help if it needed help. She did things that, you know, I've never seen anybody else do, like my parent's house backed up to some farmland which back in the '80s had - still had cows grazing on it.

I mean we were just walking back there one time, and she just started sort of singing to the cows, who were like 100 feet away. And they just came to her. And I don't think cows normally do that, you know? But they came to her, you know, because they knew that she was trying to send them love. And it was really touching and she did something like that every day, you know, with animals.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "BLUE LINE") Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.


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