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Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Busting The Quinoa Myth

Tri-color quinoa. (avlxyz/Flickr)

Tri-color quinoa. (avlxyz/Flickr)

If you’re part of the health-conscious foodie crowd, there’s a good chance you eat quinoa.

Five years ago, a lot of people couldn’t pronounce it and had never heard of it. But a boom in the popularity of this so-called Andean “super-grain” is pushing demand sky-high.

As Americans eat more of it, there are suggestions that people who live closest to quinoa — the indigenous people of the Andes — are being deprived of the food because the price has gone so high.

But NPR food and health correspondent Allison Aubrey says the truth is complicated.

Guest


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  • Jeffrey

    The idea of needing to combine proteins to replace the “complete” protein of meat is wrong and long shown to be so.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protein_combining

  • cali_john

    “Replacement for meat?”  Many plant foods, not just quinoa, have enough essential amino acids for nutrition.
    You base the idea of “complete protein” on a theory often promulgated to the advantage of the animal agriculture industry.  What is your evidence for the reality of this theory?  Can you name anyone in the United States who has been proven to have suffered ill health from not getting enough “complete protein” if they were eating adequate calories? 

    Quit spreading meat and dairy industry propoganda such as this protein myth.  The clear implication of this blurb in the segment (broadcast around lunch  where I live) was that you needed to eat meat as a source of “complete protein” if you didn t have a (expensive and rare)food like quinoa available.

    NPR needs to  publicly retract the false statements made on it’s airwaves in this segment that plant foods need to be combined at meals for adequate nutrition and that only meat or quinoa are “complete proteins.”

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