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Thursday, May 2, 2013

Journalists Get Rare Look Inside Cuba’s Prisons

While the hunger strike inside the U.S. detention center at Guantanamo Bay continues, there are separate concerns in other parts of Cuba about conditions at regular prisons.

Cuban prisons are usually closed to outside scrutiny, but foreign journalists were recently allowed through the doors of one prison, for the first time in almost a decade.

The visit comes ahead of a Universal Periodic Review by the United Nations Human Rights Council.

The BBC’s Sarah Rainsford reports that at the entrance to a cell block, the journalists were given paper flowers, handmade by inmates.


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  • http://openid.aol.com/rlupodimare RAOUL

    Apparently Cuba has not jailed all Cubans….. one is now a senator in Texas and the other guy is a Senator in Florida making B.S. statements that is ruining democracy in America. Solution: Send Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz back to Cuba.

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