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Tuesday, April 9, 2013

Remembering Annette Funicello

In this 1963 photo, singer Frankie Avalon and actress Annette Funicello are seen on Malibu Beach during filming of "Beach Party," in California in 1963. (AP)

In this 1963 photo, singer Frankie Avalon and actress Annette Funicello are seen on Malibu Beach during filming of “Beach Party,” in California in 1963. (AP)

She was one of America’s favorites.

Annette Funicello burst onto the scene as cute-as-a-button child star on TV’s Mousketeers in the 1950s, and was later a star in those beach party movies with Frankie Avalon.

She died yesterday at the age of 70. She had been debilitated for more than 20 years by multiple sclerosis (MS).

Author Wally Lamb included her as a character in his book “Wishin’ and Hopin’ A Christmas Story.”

He knew she was sick and he told us he “wanted to blow a kiss to her.”


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