PLEDGE NOW
Here and Now with Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson
Public radio's live
midday news program
With sponsorship from
Mathworks - Accelerating the pace of engineering and science
Accelerating the pace
of engineering and science
Thursday, April 4, 2013

Regressive Vs. Progressive Taxes: Do Southern Tax Policies Kill Poor People?

Katherine Newman, dean of the School of Arts and Sciences at Johns Hopkins University, says the tax system in the South is killing poor people — literally.

Newman is also the co-author of “Taxing the Poor: Doing Damage to the Truly Disadvantaged.”

She says that sales taxes are leading to higher death rates, more crime and a lower rate of high school graduation. Mainly in the South and increasingly in the West. She writes:

While the federal government has largely stuck by the principle of progressive taxation, the states have gone their own ways: tax policy is particularly regressive in the South and West, and more progressive in the Northeast and Midwest. When it comes to state and local taxation, we are not one nation under God. In 2008, the difference between a working mother in Mississippi and one in Vermont — each with two dependent children, poverty-level wages and identical spending patterns — was $2,300.


Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

September 2 9 Comments

Why Head Lice Are Becoming More Drug-Resistant

Some of these small parasites have been mutating and are now resistant to many over-the-counter medications.

September 1 12 Comments

Favorite Son Hopes To Revive Michigan Football

The story of what's happened at Michigan over the last decade plays out in a new book by John Bacon.

September 1 3 Comments

Living With ALS In The Ice Bucket Age

Corey Reich was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease in 2007 when he was 21. Now 29, he continues to do well.

August 31 Comment

Adapting ‘The Boys In The Boat’ For Young Adult Readers

Daniel James Brown decided to adapt his book after an increasing number of young people told him they loved the story.