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Friday, March 29, 2013

Netflix Wants To Change How You Watch TV

Netflix is releasing a new season of the show "Arrested Development," which has been off the air for six years.

Netflix is releasing a new season of the show “Arrested Development,” which has been off the air for six years.

Netflix – long known for its movie offerings – is now trying to change the way you watch television.

Earlier this year, the company released the original series “House of Cards,” starring Kevin Spacey.

Yesterday it announced a deal to have the Wachowski siblings, who made the Matrix movies, create an original sci-fi series.

And in May, Netflix is releasing a new season of Arrested Development, which has been off the air for six years.

When the S&P 500 reached an all-time closing high yesterday, Netflix was No. 1 overall.

But there’s competition coming from other streaming video services, including Amazon and Hulu.

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Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

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