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Thursday, February 21, 2013

Expert: Violent Video Games Should Be For Adults Only

Calif. State Sen. Leland Yee holds up three video games after a news conference following the 2011 Supreme Court ruling that it is unconstitutional to bar children from buying or renting violent video games. (Paul Sakuma/AP)

Calif. State Sen. Leland Yee holds up three video games after a news conference following the 2011 Supreme Court ruling that it is unconstitutional to bar children from buying or renting violent video games. (Paul Sakuma/AP)

The mass shooting in Newtown, Conn. set off a fresh debate about the effects of media violence, including violent video games, on children.

National Rifle Association CEO Wayne LaPierre put the blame for the incident squarely on the entertainment media, calling it a “callous, corrupt and corrupting shadow industry that sells, and sows, violence against its own people.”

President Barack Obama called for research into the relationship between “video games, media images, and violence.”

Nancy Carlsson-Paige is a child development expert. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Nancy Carlsson-Paige is a child development expert. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

TV and film executives, along with leaders in the gaming industry met with Vice President Joe Biden on the issue, though people in their own industries criticized them for it, saying the very act of meeting with Biden signaled – incorrectly - that there was something wrong with their products.

In the aftermath of the shooting, some schools have been disciplining kids for playing with toy guns.

A five-year-old girl was suspended from a kindergarten in Mount Carmel, Pa. for a “terrorist threat,” after talking with a classmate about shooting each other with bubbles from a Hello Kitty bubble blower.

In Massachusetts, five-year-old Joseph Cardosa faced suspension after reportedly building a toy gun out of Lego bricks and making shooting noises.

Longtime child development expert Nancy Carlsson-Paige (who is also the mother of artist Kyle Damon and actor Matt Damon) told Here & Now’s Robin Young that she thinks making toy guns out of Lego bricks is a healthy way to play, saying she has fond memories of her Annie Oakely hat and double cap guns with which she and her friends played war games.

Children need to play good guy versus bad guy games, she says, which is why she is for war games. But Carlsson-Paige says in order for those war games to be healthy, they should be something children make up.

Carlsson-Paige says the aggressive marketing of toys connected to movies and video games harms children’s play, because they are given characters, weapons and plots – in short, leaving them very little room for engaging in creative play.

Carlsson-Paige also says that toy makers routinely market toys from movies and video games rated “mature” to kids as young as four, and she wants laws to stop the the sale and marketing of adult-level toys to young children.

As for video games, Carlsson-Paige said, “I’m not for censorship. I’m not talking about the 22 year old playing Call of Duty. I don’t want to take video games away from adults. I just want them kept from children.”

Guest:


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  • Kathy

    There are plenty of games that aren’t appropriate for children. However, grandstanding on toys just plays into the NRA’s agenda. Every other country in the developed world has the same games, the same toys, but they do not have America’s lax gun laws nor do they have America’s gun violence problem.

    The problem is the guns. The real ones.

    • Portland Conservative

      Gun’s are illegal in Mexico, how has that worked for violence?  The UK banned guns 1999, ten years later gun crime goes up 89%.
      http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1223193/Culture-violence-Gun-crime-goes-89-decade.html

      • Ncolen

        No one, no one, of any real importance or power is talking about outlawing guns, simply controlling the types and number of guns that are easily accessible. If your a good shot you don’t need a clip with more than ten bullets, I say this as a gun owner, in reality you don’t need acess to anything other than basic hunting rifles shot guns and revolvers.

        • Portland Conservative

          Where do you come up with 10 bullets?  Did arbitrarily pull this from the air?

          Georgia Mom shoots intruder 5 of 6 times with .38 revolver.  Intruder runs off and crashes his car a mile down the road.  I think she would have preferred to have more than 10 shots.  What if there were multiple assailants?

          LAPD light up the WRONG truck.
          http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/02/07/16888732-women-shot-by-cops-were-just-delivering-papers?lite

          It’s not a need.  Please read the US Bill of Rights.  Also, read Heller vs DC.  It’s not a matter of need, it’s a right, and as a gun owner, you should really consider knowing your rights.

           

        • Ed

          If you are a good shot you don’t need a clip of more than ten bullets.
          What a stupid comment?

          People in this situation Ncolen generally are in a heightened state. The adrenaline is flowing, people has edgy, they are nervous, scared, their hands probably are shaking and pulse is racing like hell. 
          Ask a cop sometime about what I just stated.
          A person confronted by some intruder or assailant is not calm.
          Maybe you think so.
          In the case of the woman in Georgia who empties 5-6 rounds into some assailant, that wasn’t enough.
          Not everyone under this kind of pressure has a steady hand at shooting. People do miss their targets.
          Please think some before making your comments.
          Tell us how you would react if and when someone broke into your house. Are you going to greet them with a “hello” and a “beer”?
          Your adrenaline is going to kick in and its going to either be “fight or flight” Ncolen. Your life could depend on how many bullets you have “ready to go” if needed. Or would you prefer the intruder main or kill you and your loved ones.
          It all sounds good on paper doesn’t it. But in reality the situation is different. Ask a cop sometime.
           
            

        • Aardvark

          The so called “assault weapon” is a media hyped misnomer.
          The models available to the general public are NOT the same
          as the ones the military uses. They only LOOK similar.
          The civilian version lacks the full auto option, they are semi auto,
          (one trigger pull, one shot. ten trigger pulls, ten shots).
          I own several semi auto hunting rifles and shotguns that do 
          the same thing only they don’t LOOK  like military rifles.
          The size of the clip is nonsense also. You’d be amazed how fast
          you can drop an empty clip and replace it with a full magazine or
          you can carry two or more weapons to create the same mayhem.
          Face it, 99% of the victims are in panic mode and looking to escape
          not confront their assailant so clip capacity is a canard.
          Every one of these nuts has had mental problems and been on
          psychotropic  drugs or not taking them as prescribed.
          Most probably should have been institutionalized. Unfortunately
          the politicians and social engineers of the 80′s and 90′s closed down
          most mental health facilities in the US to cut costs. We are now reaping the results of this poor decision.

    • Ncolen

      Nothing is inappropriate it’s all about presentation and parenting.

  • Susan Brink

    When my children were young, I didn’t buy them toy guns. Once, they went to a neighbor’s house. Those parents also did not buy toy guns. But my two girls and my neighbor’s two girls had an idea. They took a crucifix off of the wall and began “shooting,” playing bad guy, good guy with the gun.
    Susan, Portland, Oregon

  • http://twitter.com/JohnnyFroggg J Frog

    Not just imitative.  In this digital age, there are very few real ramifications for not “playing” nicely.  It used to be, in face to face play, you couldn’t just swear, berate or disrespect someone without their being some fallout.  And that fallout taught you a lesson.  Not anymore.  Modern play exists in a land of anonymity with few consequences…and new lessons are being learned.  Combine that with the photo realistic violence of modern games and you have the recipe for problems.  I don’t say every kid will be effected by the violence, but it seems the psychologically vulnerable have been.

    • Kathy

      Why isn’t creating problems in countries that don’t have free access to guns though?

      • http://twitter.com/JohnnyFroggg J Frog

        Who says it isn’t creating problems?  The study says there are less gun-related homocides in countries that ban guns.  Very logical…and a good thing.  But it doesn’t mean there isn’t an underlying violence problem.  Statistics goey subject but gun ownership has been basically stable since 1993.  Why is the mass murder problem apparently getting worse in America?

        • Kathy

          Violent crime isn’t getting worse. In the 20 years since Mortal Combat, the murder rate in the US has been cut nearly in half.

          • http://twitter.com/JohnnyFroggg J Frog

            So are you saying there isn’t a problem?

          • Kathy

            There is a problem. The problem is guns. We have too many. We do nothing to license them.

          • http://twitter.com/JohnnyFroggg J Frog

            If violence is decreasing, why do you think gun ownership is any more correlated to violence than violent video games?

          • Jeremy Miller

            The problem is people like you that demonize guns. There are not too many.
            If our enemies attacked us on our land, you would be happy that you had a gun, when they come for you.

            Also if you take guns away, only the good people will let them go, criminals will continue to find them. Leaving the good defenseless.

            We could do a better job of tracking private sales of guns, I agree.

            Most importantly guns are not the problem, education is.

          • Portland Conservative

             How is licensing guns going to do anything to prevent crime? Most guns used in crimes are attained legally.  A very small percentage of crime guns are stolen. 

            It is already illegal to purchase a gun for someone else, which is the primary method that criminals get their guns. 

            Criminals by definition ignore laws, so how would licensing them ensure that a law breaker follows the law?

          • Sick of you idiots

             Bull, most guns used in crimes are obtained illegally. Only 10-15% of guns used in crimes were bought legally. Do some damn research.

          • Portland Conservative

             This is straight from your liberal media.
            http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/guns/procon/guns.html

            Stolen guns account for 10% to 15%, you should consider researching yourself….

          • Portland Conservative

             When I say legally, I am referring to an individual purchasing the gun from a store.  The gun is typically transferred to a third party soon after, constituting a straw purchase, which is illegal.

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    • Jean D

      Have you played MMORP games?  There are fall out of not playing nicely.  Most of the popular online games requires people to work as a group in complicated tasks. If everyone doesn’t pull their weight and work as a unit the task fails.  Unlike sport teams where there is a clear leader, this are often groups of individuals with not clear leader.  Someone has to decide to take control and learn to manage a team of people with different assets and problems.  I would argue it’s a lot like most work project groups now.  Players who swear, berate or disrespect can be kicked out of a group by common vote.  If someone doesn’t like the group dynamic, they can leave and fine one that fits them better.  

      • http://twitter.com/JohnnyFroggg J Frog

        I have played MMORP games and I have no doubt there are lots of great people like you out there.  But check out some of the anonymous beratings in the “Here and Now” comments above.  Would someone say such things to someone else in person?  I doubt it.  I’m sure you’ve seen very similar (and worse) comments in the MMORP public chat channels (or random finder games) when people disagree or might not have their game up to snuff.  Hit and run berating with no consequences.

        • Anon YMouse

           People also have to learn not to take insults very seriously and let it bounce off them. It amazes me how many people do not learn this, and I guess it is hard if you don’t learn how.

  • Heather

    Ratings have not seem to had an effect on the sales of violent video games. Free play is going to happen – I remember my daughters, in pre-school at the time, telling how the kids were building towers with blocks and flying planes into them. They were being deluged with the news reports at home. Their parents were talking about it. While we can teach them how to cope by talking about it, children process through creative play. The problem with video games – particularly now, it that they are so very, very realistic and also glorify violent action. We parise guns and the military, and then they play these games which give them a very real biochemical high when they rack up the points, and this will shape the neurological connections in the brain, which become largely hard-wired in the teen years. Also, the neurology of a teen casue the emotions to play a larger role in decision making. With the cultural conditioning to violence and weapons as exciting, and the games rewarding children for violent behavior, is it any surprise that our children act out aggressively and seek new highs in aggressive behavior? Kids WANT to by these violent games – it is like waving a red flag to get their attention. The action movies that offer lines of action figures often include rating that exclude young children, yet parents think if there is a toy, it must be OK. We can’t shield kids from it if they leave the house, but we also need to play a greater role in what our children are doing and watching.  We need to look as a culture at what we consider truly important vote with our pocketbooks. We need to talk to our children honestly about out concerns. 

    • Ncolen

      Children understand the difference between fact and fiction and as long as things are presented in a safe controlled environment with parents who are willing to explain everything to their children (you mane job as a parent) nothing is inapropriat.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_Y6CO5C2HE4WM2OYGCDVWGPRXXM oldman

    Present a situation where a 10 year old child can be presented a video game where they see nudity (just nudity) and one where they can graphically splatter someone else’s brains across a sidewalk and chances are they would be horrified at  the former and maybe mildly distasteful about the latter. The ones who have been overly desensitized are the parents.

    • Ncolen

      You clearly know nothing about child development. A ten year old is fully capable of knowing the difference between fiction and reality and as long as they’re parents are around to tell them what behavior is acceptable no, NO, piece of art or pop culture you show them will cause a moral shift in them. This country is being over run by uninformed puritans.

  • Jean D

    My husband is a gamer and we do let our 10 yo play games other people wouldn’t, but we never let them play something my husband hasn’t played and evaluated.  So no Call of Duty or Modern Warfare, but we will do Diablo or Borderlands.  All are rated Mature.  And he plays them with my husband, not on his own.  As far as the assertion he doesn’t know the difference, I beg to differ, but then we have conversations about it.  Including moral vs. immoral decisions in the game.  So when after Newtown people were talking about arming teachers my 10 yo reaction was, “That’s insane,” not, “Wow, cool.”  Somehow he’s picked up from his gaming that guns don’t always shoot where you want them to and you can get hurt by friendly fire.  Like anything else, it all depends on context and parental supervision.  

  • burroak

    Important subject that warrents its current investiagtive discussions. An important component with this is exposure. What studies are there that suggest the correlation with specific amount of violent exposure and the effects on developing young minds.
    When a child is exposed to classical music, a loving pet, a beautiful sunset, a landscape painting, or piece of architecture; what are their effects?
    So, comparing exposure amounts between violence and beauty in young minds; what are the results?

  • Ncolen

    Wow another one sided discussion this is getting to be a real problem with the show wich I used to love. Next time your going to have this talk look at what dr. Fredrick worthiem did to the comic industry, these people’s claims sound far to similar to his. For every study that points in one direction there are hundreds that say the opposite, next time have a person who actually understands the history of this countries censorship laws as your guest clearly had no historical understanding of what she was disscussing and this push against popular culture has been happening since at least 1943 with the congressional hearings about comics influence on juvinile violence and delinquency.

    • Robin Y

      Hmmm. Not sure what you heard? But she clearly said, she doesn’t want to censor anything, isn’t against violent movies and games for adults,
      is only against the marketing of objects from them to kids as young as 4.

      Best
      Robin

      • Ncolen

        I heard a one sided disscussion that did nothing to move the debate forward.

      • Kathy

        They always say they don’t want to censor.

      • Aardvark

        I probably got my first cap pistol at that age and I’m 65 now with
        a full carry concealed permit for the last 40 years. Haven’t shot
        anyone yet other than FPS bad guys.

  • Portland Conservative

    Let me start by saying that I’m a gun owner, I have my concealed carry permit, and I’m a member of the NRA. 

    I played cops and robbers, and computer games like Duke Nuke’m.

    The problem isn’t guns, video games or movies.  The problem is parenting.

    • Ncolen

      Exactly! Well that and young people who don’t have good parents having access to guns.

    • TJtruthandjustice

       True. Anybody who lets their kids play these hyper-violent, super-realistic video games without being concerned is a bad parent.

      I’m curious: why on earth do you feel the need to carry a concealed weapon? I don’t like the idea of paranoid people walking around with guns in their pockets itching for fights. Ridiculous.

      • Aardvark

        I also have full carry permit and just because I have it doesn’t
        mean I walk around with a shoulder holster under my jacket
        every day of the week. It means I can if I feel the necessity to. I was taught by instructors that use of lethal force is the method of last resort and I personally will go out of my way to avoid a sketchy situation.
        You seem to have this fantasy about everyone carrying iron
        on their hip and it’s “Red Dead Revolver”. 
        The only one being paranoid here is you.

        • Mynameispickle86

           it’s not worth the time to try to convince these anti-guns people, they fail to consider the fact that very few of the people who commit crimes with guns go about getting their weapons in a legitimate and law abiding manor meaning that taking guns out of the hands of citizens is merely creating more victims that can’t defend themselves. i’m willing to bet that if these gunmen knew that everyone had guns and could fight back if fired upon then they would carry out there plans. If anything these massacres only prove that we need more responsible  citizens carrying weapons to defend the innocent children that these disgusting pieces of human scum often target

      • Portland Conservative

        I’m not paranoid.  I have a BS in engineering and an MBA, so I’m not a crazy redneck either.

        I carry for the same reason that I have a fire extinguisher in my house.  In the highly unlikely event that I ever need to defend myself or a loved one, I would prefer to have the odds stacked in my favor.

        Also, in the ultra highly unlikely event that there is ever an active shooter, I will get my scrawny butt out of there rather than save people that choose not to defend themselves.

        • TJtruthandjustice

          Fatal gun accidents involving “law abiding” gun owners are exponentially more frequent and more likely than random assaults by strangers, so if you’re basing your safety decisions purely on statistics, you’re much better off getting rid of the gun.

          • Portland Conservative

             Please cite your sources.

            In 2011, there were 390 justifiable homicides where a firearm was used.
            http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/crime-in-the-u.s/2011/crime-in-the-u.s.-2011/tables/expanded-homicide-data-table-14

            This is clearly old data from 1992, but Bureau of Justice Statistics found that annually, 699,999 individuals used a gun in self defense.  Over the last 10 years, violent crime has decreased in half, therefore, with older statistics, let’s be generous, and say that since 1992, violent crime has decreased by 75%.  This estimates that a handgun was used in self defense approximately 175,000 times annually.

            This blog is obviously not mine, but this guy lists the “law abiding citizens” that you are referring to, and the numbers are considerably less than the justifiable homicides.
            http://alawabidingcitizen.blogspot.com/

            Like I said earlier, I won’t be using my firearm unless it is in defense of myself or someone I care about.

            If you are familiar with use of force laws, you should know that deadly force is allowed to protect yourself, or a third party from bodily harm.

          • Portland Conservative
          • TJtruthandjustice

            “Owning a gun at home substantially increase the risk of death by firearm to everyone in the home. It turns out that suicide is the leading cause of death for Americans who have purchased a handgun within the previous year. (data published in the New England Journal of Medicine – Wintermute GJ. NEJM. 2008; 358:1421-4). Like cigarette smoke, owning a firearm has deleterious effects on everyone in the home, not just on the one who purchased the gun. Writing in the peer-reviewed journal Annals of Emergency Medicine, Dr. Wiebe reported on a case-controlled study in which household were matched on a number of demographic factors, and then incidences of gun violence were compared. They found that people who keep a gun in their home are almost twice as likely to die in a gun-related homicide, and that the risk was especially greater for women: women living in a home where there is a gun are almost three times more likely to die in a gun-related homicide than men similarly situated. The risk of killing oneself using a gun was almost 17 times greater for persons who live in a home where there is a gun, compared to those in homes without guns. (Wiebe D. Annals of Emergency Medicine. 2003; 41:771-82).”

            http://www.dailykos.com/story/2012/03/26/1077930/-Statistics-Guns-and-Wishful-Thinking

          • Portland Conservative

             I’m choosing to ignore your suicide comment, because even without guns, people commit suicide.  Take for example Japan, 30,000 Japanese commit suicide annually without the use of a gun.
            http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/03/04/japan-suicide-rate-still-_n_831430.html

            Yes, there are a LOT of people that shouldn’t own guns, and many people that blatantly disregard basic gun handling rules, such as always treat it as loaded, and safe storage.

            As far as “accidental shooting of family members” those that do, also ignore basic gun handling rules.

  • Teh

    How many of these children are on medications, Robin?
    Its been over two months since the shooting at Sandy Hook school and nothing mentioned on that subject.
    Did you know Robin, that over 80% of the shooter in the past 10 years or so have been on some anti-psychotic or anti depressant medication?

    Why aren’t you questioning the role of Big Pharma in these shooting?
    Probably because NPR and Here and Now get big bucks from them to air their advertisements.

    It article is all rehashed pap from the past.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100004264362336 Kyle Hill

       ^^^^^This^^^^^^

  • Orion.

    President Barack Obama called for research into the relationship between “video games, media images, and violence.”
    Yes, Mr. President. What about the connection of all the medications these shooters are on at the time of these incidents?
    What about all your friends in Hollywood who produce these violent TV programs and movies?
    Let’s get to the root of the problem, Mr. President.
    All you are interested in is either gun control, immigration issues or rights for the gay. The American people have higher priorities such as jobs and the economy.
    Enough of the smoke and mirrors Obama.
    I know of many who are tired of all your lies, misinfo and disinfo.
    Just who in the hell do you represent, Mr. Obama? 
    The American people or your Globalist masters who have bought and paid for your services as their “front man” 

    • Ncolen

      Are you just trolling? Or are you so deep in your bubble that you believe what you are saying?

      • Ben

        Go back to sleep Mcolon. You are one of those lost sheeples of America.
        Take your meds.

    • Kathy

      Trolly troll troll

      • Lavada

        Another bright comment by another idiot from America

      • Clara

        Kathy and Ncolen, two sides of the same coin.  Give us some real input rather than your dribble.

        Your head is your house, furnish it.

  • http://www.facebook.com/michelle.louden.75 Michelle Louden

    This discussion is missing the research on video games and violence. As it turns out, researchers initially found conflicting results, but ultimately the reviews do show that video games lead to aggression.  Later, research found that this was only true for men, not women.  Finally, Kimberly Thomas and Ronald Levant found in 2012 that this is only true for men that endorse traditional masculinity ideals–like dominance, aggression, restrictive emotionality, and negativity toward sexual minorities. For men who were more egalitarian and accepting of femininity, this relationship with aggression was nonexistent. Please let people know about the research, because it is sorely missing from this discussion! I have a very dear boyfriend, and he and his friends adore first person shooters, but are also the most feminist people I know, and would never hurt a fly. Encouraging young boys to engage in empathy and caring and kindness while also allowing them to have their fun with violent video games should be the focus of this discussion!

  • mom

    Nancy is right on the mark.  So refreshing to finally hear someone publicly supporting parents in the fight to raise my kids well in this culture.

  • JeffOrielly

    To start off I’d hope you are no longer billing yourself as a balanced show that views problems fairly. Violent video games are already rated M witch is 17+, all this talk takes something that was not my problem (other peoples kids) and makes it my problems (changing my preferred self defense method and media).

     Have you ever heard of don’t do the crime unless you can do the time, well I’m sorry you cant be bothered to put 18 years into that pink whining blob of DNA you made. But your lack of raising your kid has as much as the conception of the child did, unless it’s my baby (witch I can guarantee it’s not) he has nothing to do with me until he threatens someone or shoots up a building full of people. If you can’t even control your 4 year old and what they watch, what are you going to do when they get older and start having real problems?

  • http://www.ohioken.com Ken Palosi

    To me violent video games are a major part of the problem of violence in our society today. I posted the following in my blog It is Time for Us to Take a Stand Against Violence at http://ohioken.wordpress.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=389&action=edit .

    To me video games are a large part why our children are becoming desensitized to violence. Unfortunately many adults not only let small children play violent video games, the play them with them. Some of the video games that are sold in America are so graphic that I don’t think that anyone, young or old should be playing them. Recently I was at a Christmas party were Santa Claus made a visit. Before Santa’s arrival the parents of the children present snuck presents into Santa’s bag for the kids. One by one the kids sat on Santa’s lap and opened the present that they thought was from Santa but was really from the child’s parents. One eight year old boy received a video game entitled Call of Duty: Black Ops II. The game was rated 17+, which means that it not only wasn’t intended for young children but that it was illegal for anyone under the age of 17 to even purchase it. The rating label listed the following items which the game contained: Blood and Gore, Intense Violence, Strong Language, Suggestive Themes, Use of Drugs. Are these the type of games that we should let an eight year-old child watch? Far too many parents are purchasing those violent video games for their children. And what is worse; they are playing them with their children. When parents spend time playing with their children it has a huge impact on them. What little child isn’t going to think that all that violence, gore, and mayhem is accepted behavior when they are experiencing it by playing a video game with dad!

    • Kathy

      If video games are making kids more violent, why has a raise in the number of people playing video games been accompanied by a drop in the amount of violent crime?

      • Portland Conservative

        Violent crime has dropped in half over the last 10 years.  In case you wanted a source :)
        http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/crime-in-the-u.s/2011/crime-in-the-u.s.-2011/tables/table-1

        • Guest

           Kids under the age of 8 are still learning what is real and what is not. today’s gun violence can’t be directly associated with video games of today. You would need to compare it to the video games of ten years ago and who was playing them. and you would need to look at a whole host of other variables.

          • http://www.ohioken.com Ken Palosi

            I can associate them to video games of ten years ago. A family members who let their son play Muntant Ninja Turtles as a five year old died a violent death by a gun at 22.

          • Anon YMouse

             So you are saying because he played a violent video game, he was a VICTIM of a violent DEATH? Karma or something? Are you a compete moron or am I not understanding you?

        • http://www.ohioken.com Ken Palosi

          I look at the link and couldn’t find where the drop in violent crime was shown to be linked to video games. Please post a better link, I really would like to be informed on this.

          • Anon YMouse

             It’s not a link, it is a lack of link. It shows that violent video games are not a cause in the rise of violence.

          • Kathy

            There’s no link, video games are completely irrelevant to real violence. That was the point. 

      • http://www.ohioken.com Ken Palosi

        Kathy, please post any research studies that support your correlation. I would be greatly interested in reading them.

    • Jeremy Miller

      There are not bad video games only bad parents

      • http://www.ohioken.com Ken Palosi

        There are bad video games and there are bad parents who let little children watch the.

        • Spielmeister456

          I myself am a teenager, 15 years old. I play violent video games such as Team Fortress 2, Battlefield 3, and the occasional 007 Goldeneye for the N64 or Doom for the PC, all four of these video games being “violent” as the media likes to put it. I’ve played 007 specifically when I was around the age of six. In your response, you mention how an eight-year-old child received Black Ops II for Christmas. Yeah, they might not have been a lot younger than the recommended age level to play the game, but children need to learn that violence is a commonplace thing occurring in our daily lives, and we need to get used to it. Besides, once a child learns that guns can kill, it’s stuck with them.

          My family has a .38 caliber revolver somewhere around the house, and we have all the appropriate licenses to own said revolver. Have I ever felt the need to use the .38 special? Only when I desired to go down to the range over at Camp Bullis, an army training grounds in San Antonio, TX. Every time I travel there, my dad’s right by my side. I never have the urge to spend all six rounds on any human nearby when the firearm in in my hands. Any sane person like myself would easily state that ending another human’s life would be a crime viewed upon by anyone, no matter what the culture.

        • Hawktalon7890

           play*

    • realist

      You wouldn’t let your children watch pulp fiction, listen to anthrax or Whitechapel, or read house of leaves or a Dan Brown book would you? Watch ncis or CSI? Video games are absolutely no different and I’ve even been carded buying God of War 3, when I had a full beard! Like another commenter before me, its a sign of bad parenting only.

      • http://www.ohioken.com Ken Palosi

        You are absolutey right! I do not let my grandchildren watch pulp fiction, listen to anthrax, or read the books you mention. I don’t even watch ncis or CSI myself; partly because of the violence and partly because they are justplain stupid. A sign of bad parenting is letting little children watch violence.

        • Aardvark

          I am 65 years old, a combat veteran and licensed full
          carry concealed pistol holder and an avid PC gamer
          including what are labeled these days as “violent”.
          I also played with cap pistols as a child and probably logged
          in thousands of hours of war,cops and robbers and cowboys
          and Indians with my friends none of whom to my knowledge
          went over to the “dark side”.
          I have a son who was raised in a similar environment and
          has played the same games and watched the same violent
          movies as I have as well as the classics.
          My son was never in any trouble with the authorities, 
          was taught respect for himself, others and his country
          and is now an attorney. He is also still a gamer as well
          as a husband and father.
          I don’t believe in drowning children in a Bacchanalian orgy
          of violence however, everything in the world is not nice and
          I don’t believe in raising children like hot house orchids. 
          Better they know the evils of the real world so they may
          be better prepared to deal with them.

          • http://www.ohioken.com Ken Palosi

            How about if we try to change “the evils of the real world” that our children will have to deal with?

          • Aardvark

            According to popular myth God sent his only son
            to do that and you know how that turned out.
            He made the mob feel bad and they killed Him.
            There will always be miscreants in the world  
            because it’s part of the duality of man. Whether
            it’s one individual in a Connecticut town or
            a world leader the likes of Caligula, Stalin or Hitler.
             Utopias are a myth and when they have been tried  in reality they have all failed miserably, without
            exception. 
            “Star Trek” is a metaphor for utopia, it’s a fantasy
            that will never happen. I always wondered why
            you never see anyone mopping the floors or
            cleaning the bathroom.
            “Alien” on the other hand is a metaphor for 
            real life. The ship is dirty, greasy and grungy, owned
            by an uncaring manipulative corporation and somewhere in the dark there is something waiting to
            kill you if you’re careless or unwise.

          • http://www.ohioken.com Ken Palosi

            That is a pretty pessimistic outlook Aardvark. While I realize that utopia will probably never materialize that is no reason we can’t work toward a more peaceful world. Answering violence with more violence just exacerbates the problem. With more than five thousand years of written history on the books it seems to me that mankind has learned very little when it comes to coexisting with each other.

          • http://www.facebook.com/umanouski Greg Maghan

             I’ve seen a few of your posts, you cannot be that naive right?

    • anon

      ITT: People who’ve never played video games argue the merits of said medium.

      • http://www.ohioken.com Ken Palosi

        Not sure what your comment meant. Please elaborate.

        • Anon YMouse

           He is saying you shouldn’t say how video games effect anyone (especially old people, who you say shouldn’t play violent video games which is ridiculous, do you think we don’t know fact from fantasy?) if you haven’t played them. Do you say adults shouldn’t watch R rated movies too? It’s a really crazy notion.

    • Anon YMouse

       >”which means that it not only wasn’t intended for young children but that
      it was illegal for anyone under the age of 17 to even purchase it.”

      Not true. Read the caption under the first picture. You are being ignorant.

    • Mynameispickle86

       with this argument we should also ban classic cartoons like looney tunes where characters often bash eachother’s faces in with hammers, jump off of cliffs, blow eachother up stab eachother, dress in drag and trick eachother into homoerotic situations. and even attempted rape is satired (see pepe lapue) Big difference there is the characters are perfectly fine after being subjected to these things. Is it really more harmful to show that if a person is shot they die? back in the hay day of loony tunes parents talked to their children and took on the roles of teaching them morals and life values, they discussed love, life, mortality and the difference between reality and fantasy, things that parents now relly on the cold uncaring school system. children are expected to be adults from birth now, pushed and prodded and broken into molds, given mind altering drugs and pseudo therapy to prevent free thinking and energy and the parents are their torturers, worried more about the child “fitting in” then they are about raising well adjusted free thinking people that is the issue not games, not religion or cartoons or guns it’s the lack of caring, love, conversation and parents personally investing their full attention and emotional support and also the fault of our media for teaching sociopaths that they won’t be held accountable for their actions if they just blame other things for their decisions to commit evil and unforgivable acts

      • http://www.ohioken.com Ken Palosi

        In a way you are correct about cartoon violence. I try not to let my grandchildren watch even cartoon violence.  While many say that cartoon violence isn’t harmful it is still violence. How about if we as a society start to move away from our culture of violence and build a more peaceful society?

  • Friend

    My uncles, in the 1950s, in Ohio used to ride their bicycles to with a .22 rifle across the handlebars. Was not a one-stop-light, rural town.

    They would take their .22 rifles on the city bus to the outskirts of town and then walk to great-uncle’s farm and shoot ground hogs.

    My uncles and aunts had shooting clubs and shooting ranges at their high schools.

    No kids were shot.

    Parental absenteeism. Industrial, unified schools where kids recieve little or no indivual attention. Unified public schools have removed local control of schools, allowed big city edu-crats unchecked power and facilitated poor decsions that leave chilren as the last priority. Large bureaucracies only lead to corruption, wasteful spending and cronyism.

    Tyrannical, too powerful teachers unions that eliminate individual teacher accountability.

    Societal coddling – sports games where scores are fixed – so as not to injure the self esteem of a child on a losing team. That only serves to make life’s lessons even harder to learn later, actually injuring self-esteem.

    Huge amounts of violent immigrants from war-torn countries in central America (MS-13 etc…). The US takes in more immigrants than ALL other industrialized nations COMBINED.

  • RobM

    It was refreshing to hear that Matt Damon was able to prevent violent toys being made in his image.  It was also  clear that Nancy Carlsson-Paige (his mother) an education thought leader does not want to “censor” movies or games for adults.  Good story.  Well done

  • jemilymom

    I’m reminded of my cousin’s son who, at age 6 had his First Communion and received a crucifix on a chain to wear as a necklace. He wore it on his neck, and then grasped the two cross pieces to turn the bottom of the cross on his ‘targets’ and shoot them down.

    Kids certainly don’t need grown up help to play gun games – I think it points somewhat to our human nature. It’s a complicated problem – the solution won’t be easy. 

  • Ted

    Nothing about all the medications that these children are taking?
    Time to go after Big Pharma. 

  • Parrish

    The ratings are not clear? Any kid can buy games? Shooters cause kids to kill?

    The ratings “Teen”, “Mature”, and “everyone” are to difficult to understand? I thought you were more intelligent then that  if really couldn’t be more simplistic if you wanted it to be.

    All retailers now ask for birthdays and refuse the sale to younger kids. Completely inaccurate!

     Video games have been proven to REDUCE voilence in young people. 

    Video games offer an outlet for frustrations and teenager anger. Studies have proven this again and again.  

    While I agree young children shouldn’t play violent games its not up to you or anyone else to tell parents how to raise their children. 

    Find another white whale, and do yourself a favor and better educate yourself on the topic.

  • Jeremy Miller

    It would not prevent as much as log it.
    In IT security we cannot restrict a user to where they can no longer use their computer, Instead we log everything we cannot protect, this way if something goes wrong we can find the source and charge them with negligence. 

    This is the long run may deter people from selling, their weapons, or at least keeping them in insecure areas.

  • Vance

    These videos are good training grounds in the child’s younger years for the military later on in life.

    The title of Matthais Chang’s latest book is appropriate here.  
    Brainwashed For War, Programmed To Kill

    Take a look at today’s military and you will see a generation which grew up on video games in general.
    They are the perfect “cannon fodder” or “throaways” the military requires.

    “Once you leave the womb, conservatives don’t care about you until you reach military age. Then you’re just what they’re looking for. Conservatives want live babies so they can raise them to be dead soldiers.”    — George Carlin

    “Military men are just dumb stupid animals to be used as pawns in foreign policy.”…Henry Kissinger, quoted in “Kiss the Boys Goodbye: How the United States Betrayed Its Own POW’s in Vietnam”… 

  • Stephen McArthur

    As an advocate for victims and survivors of domestic violence, I disagree with Carlson-Paige. We don’t have a culture of violence in America.  We have a culture of male violence in America. Until we speak truth about the nature of gender violence in our communities, we’ll never succesfully address the problem.  This is not about guns, but rather about beliefs and attitudes that boys and young men learn.  Video games are only one factor.  What are 12 year-old and 13-year old boys learning when they play Grand Theft Auto, hire prostitutes in the game, have virtrual sex with them, and then to get their money back, shoot them dead. or beat them to death, or set them on fire?  When combined with other video games, TV shows, misogynistic music videos, sexualized and objectifying advertising, and movies, boys and men learn that the exercise of power and control pays off. 

    Worse, when boys see their mothers abused and controlled, the attitudes, beliefs and behaviors of the culture of male violence are re-inforced.  81% of men in batterer intevention programs report they saw their mothers abused by their fathers, step-fathers or their mother’s boyfriends. 

    If grown men want to play these games, fine.  But let’s think about what we are doing to the cognitive, behaviorial, sexual, emotional and pyschological development of young boys.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=12609288 Ian Silver

    Here and Now Team,

    Today was my first time tuning into your program, and I was bit surprised by what sounded like a call for federal regulation of the video game industry from your guest.  As an employee within the industry, I was dumbfounded by the further allegation that a child can easily purchase violent video games rated “M” for mature, and the citation of an FTC study to support that claim. (A study by the way that was published in April of 2011, and showed statistical improvement in the reduction of sales of “M” rated games to minors under the age of 17.)

    More regulation is not the answer.  I would remind your guest that the vast majority, if not all, major video game retailers participate in the ESRB’s established parameters for regulating the sale of violent video games to minors.  In effect, the industry is regulating it self.  Training for this program is extensive, and the consequences for violating ESRB regulations are severe.  In many cases, the sale of a “M” rated video game to an unaccompanied minor under the age of 17, results in the termination of that employee.  ESRB ratings are clearly posted on the cover art for all games, followed by a detailed explanation with the reasons for that rating on the back.  Within my own company, employees are required to inform the parent of the rating and the accompanying reasons for that rating in order to obtain their approval or denial the sale.

    My personal experiences with the sales of these games, is that most parents are either uninformed, or simply do not care what types of games their children are playing.  (Though there are some exceptions, it is rarely for the violent content, as much as it is for the sexual themes, use drugs, language, and/or partial nudity.)  Should an entire industry be punished for the poor parenting skills of a few?  

    While I do echo your guest’s concerns over the desensitization towards violence when it comes to our young people, I believe that it is the responsibility of the parents to ensure that their children understand the difference between the fictional world of violent video games, and the reality in which we live.  A practice she in fact applied to the violence in cartoons and her own children.  There was no federal regulatory body or policy to require she do that, it was just common sense parenting.

    Let’s tone down the calls for federal regulations that would usurp the role and responsibilities of the parent.  Let’s turn the conversation towards educating parents to help them make better informed decisions, and how they can start a conversation with their children about the differences between fictional and actual violence, and the impact that it can have on our society.

    Thank your for having this discussion.

    Ian

    ***Please note that any opinions, comments, or statements made above, are mine and do not necessarily those of my company, its subsidiaries, or affiliates.***

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=12609288 Ian Silver

    Here and Now Team,

    Today was my first time tuning into your program, and I was bit surprised by what sounded like a call for federal regulation of the video game industry from your guest.  As an employee within the industry, I was dumbfounded by the further allegation that a child can easily purchase violent video games rated “M” for mature, and the citation of an FTC study to support that claim. (A study by the way that was published in April of 2011, and showed statistical improvement in the reduction of sales of “M” rated games to minors under the age of 17.)

    More regulation is not the answer.  I would remind your guest that the vast majority, if not all, major video game retailers participate in the ESRB’s established parameters for regulating the sale of violent video games to minors.  In effect, the industry is regulating it self.  Training for this program is extensive, and the consequences for violating ESRB regulations are severe.  In many cases, the sale of a “M” rated video game to an unaccompanied minor under the age of 17, results in the termination of that employee.  ESRB ratings are clearly posted on the cover art for all games, followed by a detailed explanation with the reasons for that rating on the back.  Within my own company, employees are required to inform the parent of the rating and the accompanying reasons for that rating in order to obtain their approval or denial the sale.

    My personal experiences with the sales of these games, is that most parents are either uninformed, or simply do not care what types of games their children are playing.  (Though there are some exceptions, it is rarely for the violent content, as much as it is for the sexual themes, use drugs, language, and/or partial nudity.)  Should an entire industry be punished for the poor parenting skills of a few?  

    While I do echo your guest’s concerns over the desensitization towards violence when it comes to our young people, I believe that it is the responsibility of the parents to ensure that their children understand the difference between the fictional world of violent video games, and the reality in which we live.  A practice she in fact applied to the violence in cartoons and her own children.  There was no federal regulatory body or policy to require she do that, it was just common sense parenting.

    Let’s tone down the calls for federal regulations that would usurp the role and responsibilities of the parent.  Let’s turn the conversation towards educating parents to help them make better informed decisions, and how they can start a conversation with their children about the differences between fictional and actual violence, and the impact that it can have on our society.

    Thank your for having this discussion.

    Ian

    ***Please note that any opinions, comments, or statements made above, are mine and do not necessarily those of my company, its subsidiaries, or affiliates.***

  • Gula

    My years of observation in my work to many countries worldwide, is that you and I and our children are a product of our environment.
    I can see the differences in people raised in a city or in the country for example.
    Those raised in the ghetto or in a wealthy neighborhood.
    We are products of our environmental influences. We are shaped by our environment for better or worse.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=12609288 Ian Silver

    Here and Now Team,

    Today was my first time tuning into your program, and I was bit surprised by what sounded like a call for federal regulation of the video game industry from your guest.  As an employee within the industry, I was dumbfounded by the further allegation that a child can easily purchase violent video games rated “M” for mature, and the citation of an FTC study to support that claim. (A study by the way that was published in April of 2011, and showed statistical improvement in the reduction of sales of “M” rated games to minors under the age of 17.)

    More regulation is not the answer.  I would remind your guest that the vast majority, if not all, major video game retailers participate in the ESRB’s established parameters for regulating the sale of violent video games to minors.  In effect, the industry is regulating it self.  Training for this program is extensive, and the consequences for violating ESRB regulations are severe.  In many cases, the sale of a “M” rated video game to an unaccompanied minor under the age of 17, results in the termination of that employee.  ESRB ratings are clearly posted on the cover art for all games, followed by a detailed explanation with the reasons for that rating on the back.  Within my own company, employees are required to inform the parent of the rating and the accompanying reasons for that rating in order to obtain their approval or denial the sale.

    My personal experiences with the sales of these games, is that most parents are either uninformed, or simply do not care what types of games their children are playing.  (Though there are some exceptions, it is rarely for the violent content, as much as it is for the sexual themes, use drugs, language, and/or partial nudity.)  Should an entire industry be punished for the poor parenting skills of a few?  

    While I do echo your guest’s concerns over the desensitization towards violence when it comes to our young people, I believe that it is the responsibility of the parents to ensure that their children understand the difference between the fictional world of violent video games, and the reality in which we live.  A practice she in fact applied to the violence in cartoons and her own children.  There was no federal regulatory body or policy to require she do that, it was just common sense parenting.

    Let’s tone down the calls for federal regulations that would usurp the role and responsibilities of the parent.  Let’s turn the conversation towards educating parents to help them make better informed decisions, and how they can start a conversation with their children about the differences between fictional and actual violence, and the impact that it can have on our society.

    Thank your for having this discussion.

    Ian

    ***Please note that any opinions, comments, or statements made above, are mine and do not necessarily those of my company, its subsidiaries, or affiliates.***

  • Brett Mccarty

    I thought the key message from Dr Carlsson-Paige was about the benefit of unstructured play vs media-defined play.  The notion of invented imaginative play vs imitation play.  The worry over the way children play being dictated by media/toy messages.

  • Youatethegrape

    I think part of this is about bad parenting, but those parents are also living in a bad culture. The anything goes, say what you feel, think about yourself and your own pleasure, violence as “a right”, come at the expense of our society as a whole. Maybe 30 years ago there was, at a minimum, the idea of a moral flow that most people subscribed to. Kids didn’t go to school playing and talking about prefabricated toys and violent images because it wasn’t allowed and if they did, they got in trouble. There was a sense of authority on what was good for the classroom and therefore the child. People agreed. Now you have children in kindergarten knowing things that 40 years ago, an 8 year old would not have learned. Parents are accelerating their kids into a mature and fast-paced world that their brains and life-experience cannot support. Even with the less-violent side of life. How many moms take their 4 year old daughters to have a mani and a pedi? I was in my 30s the first time I had a pedi. We’re not allowing our kids to be children, to play and get dirty, to come up with their own ideas and stories because it’s just so much easier to let the TV take care of it. This leads them to have no critical thinking skills, no ability to assess information and it shows.

  • Krimsun

    “Violent Video Games Should Be For Adults Only”

    Ugh… DUH!!! LOOK AT THE BOX! RATED M FOR MATURE!

  • ttarrus

    At our child care center, the boys (6-8 yrs old) were playing some sort of war game in the back yard. I remember a boy coming in with very realistic looking plastic M-16. He placed this plastic machine gun in his locker, and took out a wooden gun he had glued together himself out of odd scraps of wood. It was not even painted. I asked him if that gun was better than the plastic one. He replied “Yes, Because this gun can be anything I want it to be!” And ran to join in the battle out back.

    It is not Child’s war play that is harmful, it is the realistic war play, that takes imagination away from our children.

  • Manuel Yvellez

    I am an elementary school teacher and parent of two.  I listened to the program in disgust.  It seems elitist psycho-babble to me to assert, as Ms. Carlsson did, that play comes in these two distinct forms, imitative play and original organic play.  I can’t think of play that is not imitative in some way.  Really?  There is a difference between making a gun and choosing to pick a plastic gun out of the toy box?  The kid who makes a gun is not imitating anything he or she has ever seen? Really?  Even accepting this highly dubious position, which was never challenged in the show, are care givers to stand around and judge the play as imitative or original?:  “No Billy, stop that shooting.  I have seen that plot line before.  Yes Lindsey, it’s all right to pretend stab your fellow student. I haven’t seen any stabbing movies lately.  You must be making that up.”  Is this what the “expert” thinks will work?

    So the next big solution from the “expert” is to have a better rating system.  This will do the trick.  Let’s see.  I have a copy here of Halo 4, one of the biggest selling first-person shooters.  The main character is holding a weapon on the front.  On the back you see more weapons and an alien and Spartan (the humanoid character) pointing weapons at each other.  It is clearly rated M Mature 17+.  It also states the content has “Blood” and “Violence.”  So does Ms. Carlsson believe that there are all these parents buying this game for their young children never suspecting that the game was violent?  Really?  It is my experience of many years that these same parents allow younger children to watch PG13 or R rated movies, especially if they are rated that way only for violence.  Parents are not ignorant of the obvious violence in either media.

    Is this really some of the best thinking out there on this subject?  I shudder.

  • Poo

    doi

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100002438898267 Adam Plymale

    how do I delete crap

  • Aarongulliver1

    Whats the difference between playing Call of Duty and watching Murder Documentations?
    There is no difference. It is basically the same

  • Suzane Mart

    Great work here ….

    http://www.wcityauctions.com/

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