90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW
Here and Now with Robin Young
Public radio's live
midday news program
With sponsorship from
Mathworks - Accelerating the pace of engineering and science
Accelerating the pace
of engineering and science
Monday, February 18, 2013

President Proposing Ten-Year Brain Study Project

An image of the human brain from Gray's Anatomy. (Wikimedia Commons)

An image of the human brain from Gray’s Anatomy. (Wikimedia Commons)

The Obama administration is planning a large, long term effort to understand and map the human brain, according to a story by John Markoff in The New York Times.

The brain study is modeled after the Human Genome Project, funded under Presidents George H. W. Bush and Bill Clinton, which provided the map of the human genome that is now the basis of new scientific efforts to cure diseases like cancer.

The brain study is projected to take 10 years and put the U.S. in the lead on understanding diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, as well as mental illness.

There is no projected budget at the moment, but Markoff writes that the White House may unveil the study as soon as next month.

Are you in favor of this brain study? Let us know on our Facebook page.

Guest:


Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

October 23 Comment

New Documentary Profiles Human Rights Watch Team

An elite group known as the E-Team travels across the globe documenting human rights violations and war crimes.

October 23 Comment

Bottom Of The Sea Is ‘A World Of Surprises’

The world's oceans cover nearly two-thirds of the Earth's surface, yet little is understood about the ocean floor.

October 22 13 Comments

Colorado Backs Away From Pot Edibles Ban

Critics say a ban would violate the state's voter-approved legalization of recreational marijuana, which took effect in January.

October 22 4 Comments

Modest Raise For Social Security Recipients

Economist Diane Swonk says the 1.7 percent cost-of-living increase falls short of the inflation older Americans actually see.