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Tuesday, February 12, 2013

Emergency Alert Hoax Warns Montana Of Zombies

In this image released by AMC, zombies appear in a scene from the second season of the AMC series "The Walking Dead." (Gene Page/AMC/AP)

Zombies appear in a scene from the second season of the AMC series “The Walking Dead.” (Gene Page/AMC/AP)

There are no zombies in Montana, despite a real-sounding emergency alert that kicked in over programming on two television stations – KRTV and the CW network.

Over the signature staticky beeping of the emergency alert, a voice said, “the bodies of the dead have risen and are attacking the living.” The message warned, “do not attempt to approach or apprehend these bodies as they are considered extremely dangerous.”

The Montana television network, which owns both channels, says hackers got into its emergency alert system and broadcast the threat.

The Great Falls Tribune reported that at least four people called the police after hearing the message.


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