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Thursday, January 17, 2013

Many Colorado Kids View Smoking Pot As Healthy

In this November 2012 photo, two women smoke marijuana together, behind a home in the woods near the small Rocky Mountain town of Nederland, Colo. (Brennan Linsley/AP)

In this November 2012 photo, two women smoke marijuana together, behind a home in the woods near the small Rocky Mountain town of Nederland, Colo. (Brennan Linsley/AP)

Healthy, organic, locally grown. That’s how some Colorado teens described marijuana when a group of online news organizations investigated how the legalization of medical marijuana in 2000 has affected young people.

Their attitudes might change even more now that Colorado voters legalized recreational use of marijuana for adults over 21 years old.

“They took to heart that this was healthy. They told us they had aches and pains and marijuana helped them,” said Katie Kerwin McCrimmon, a reporter with the online news site Health Policy Solutions.

“They took to heart that this was healthy. They told us they had aches and pains and marijuana helped them.”
– Katie Kerwin McCrimmon, reporter

Even though medical marijuana can normally only be prescribed to people over 18-years-old, McCrimmon found that many teens were gaining greater access to pot. Medical marijuana dispensaries are ubiquitous, and dozens were set up near schools.

“They’d go out and get high over lunch and told me that it helped them focus in the afternoon, that they’d do better in math and art when they’re high,” McCrimmon said.

Last summer, the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Denver sent letters to dispensaries within 1,000 feet of schools, telling them to move. All 50 of them complied.

Dr. Christian Thurstone, the medical director for an adolescence substance treatment program in Denver and a member of Gov. John Hickenlooper’s task force to come up with regulations on recreational use of marijuana, said his young patients seeking addiction treatment would tell him that pot helped them.

“They would say, ‘You know, Doc, why would I want to stop this medicine, it helps with me with my anger, my ADHD, it helps me sleep. Why on earth would you ask me to stop this?’” Thurstone said.

“They would say, ‘You know, Doc, why would I want to stop this medicine, it helps with me with my anger, my ADHD, it helps me sleep.’”
– Dr. Christian Thurstone

But Thurstone says that while marijuana has some medicinal value for adults, it can be very harmful to teens.

“We’ve seen, starting in the late 1980s, that adolescents exposed to marijuana have about a two to four-fold increase of developing psychosis. And we also have a good evidence now that adolescence exposure to marijuana may also affect intelligent, cognition, learning and memory,” Thurstone said.

Schools And Teen Pot Use

In the past four years, Health Policy Solutions found that Colorado schools saw a 45 percent increase in drug violations, and in Denver, there was a 71 percent hike in cases of schools calling in police for drug violations.

So what can Colorado officials do to get the message to teens that pot use isn’t good for them?

Some education officials at the state level are putting out information about harmful events, and some schools are doing education events.

But opponents to legalization say that just like tobacco and alcohol, there will be intensive marketing that will appeal to children.

That’s where Dr. Thurstone says Colorado can do a better job.

“We want to avoid the public health disaster of tobacco and hopefully we’ve learned something from that. What concerns me the most is the commercialization of marijuana, because that creates a tension between public health and safety and then the profit motive. And in order to get a profit, you have to get the new, young users. And that is hopefully what we can avoid,” Thurstone said.

The task force is now charged with looking at ways to make sure marijuana doesn’t become even more widely available to teens.

“One possibility is to have state-run stores similar to the way 18 other states regulate alcohol and that might be a way to lessen the commercial impact, advertising and marketing, especially to youth,” Thurstone said.

  • What’s your take on teenagers and pot? Let us know in the comments or join the debate on our Facebook page.

Guests:


Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
  • Steven Amick

    Pot is not addictive, despite what your self-serving “addiction specialist” sawbones says. 

  • Kathy

    This is one step away from Reefer Madness. It’s embarrassing. 

    • katskits

      Thank you Kathy.  

      • katskits

        Funny, now I take my thanks back.  Teenagers are in school, not trolling Here and Now! LOL

  • Ncolen

    Honestly I’m slightly upset by the way this conversation is being handled, marajuana is a thousand times safer than alcohol, tobacco, prescription drugs, or the drugs you can buy at most gas station. Kids are allways going to find ways to expand their miss and relieve stress with chemicals be happy their smoking pot and not drinking. Seriously if your not going to have pro marijuana scientist and activist you shouldn’t even have this conversation. Poor show guys.

    • silentazure

      A thousand times safer? Wow, that is a lot. Where did that number come from?

      • Fulton Barrons

        I think the use is more of a metaphor, like 40 days or million man march.get real deal with the information.

    • David Erikson

              I agree that legalized Marijuana is better than criminalized and that it is no worse than alcohol, but it is still important to recognize the down sides of its use.
      I have smoked it over the years occasionally and did inhale (unlike Bill Clinton) and had some positive and some blah and a couple  paranoid experiences. My younger brothers, however, became very regular users. One told me that he couldn’t get through any stressful situation, including a regular work day, with out it.  I don’t feel good about being hooked that way on any drug, Zoloft,  Prozac, sleep aids or whatever. 
              My youngest brother graduated from an ivy league school, but I and many others experience him as socially immature. In the past few years he is experiencing severe short term memory loss. Early onset dementia has been ruled out. I do not know that his drug use has caused his memory loss, but I prefer to be cautious. I want people and teens in particular to hear complete information about   the dangers. Just the tars inhaled are enough reason for me to not want to use it often. Let’s allow the debate and not get defensive about authorities trying to take away something we wish was healthy. 

      • maxwood

        Unfortunately the discussion didn’t mention alternatives to smoking (tars, carbon monoxide, heat shock etc.) such as vaporizers or  properly operated one-hitters.  Dementia, memory loss etc.  result from combustion toxins  but are routinely attributed to the cannabis.

      • Fulton Barrons

        You probably don”t know, but inhaling smoke is not the only way. Cannabis can be made in pill, salve, tinctures, in edibles, not just brownies.Also the Medical side of cannabis has evolved into a big business and has taken away the smoking part, so more people can use it.You say your one brother that uses has memory loss but you haven”t said if he used other drugs or alcohol which also could exacerbate a problem.

    • CoDoc442

      I am sorry, but I don’t know where you got your data.  1000 times safer than alcohol, tobacco, and drugs??  Please read the medical literature and post a comment that is more realistic.  Marijuana has not been adequately studied and has not been firmly proven to be of any benefit, despite the well-documented harms associated with its use.  

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Kevin-Hunt/100003205282238 Kevin Hunt

        “Has not been adequately studied”?  You mean 5,000 of study hasn’t been enough?  Good thing FDA approved pills are studied so ‘extensively’.

        FDA warns that diabetes drug Actos may increase bladder
        cancer

        FDA warns of liraglutide risk

        COPD mist inhaler Spiriva may increase risk of death.

        Seizure medications linked to pregnancy risk

        FDA warns simvastatin may cause severe muscle damage

        Osteoporosis Drugs & New Evidence on Heightened Risk of
        Femur Fractures

         Meridia
        Recalled – Maker Pulls the Diet Drug Pill Due to FDA Concerns of Increased Risk
        of Heart Attack & Stroke

        Paxil, Celexa, Effexor, Lexapro, Prozac & Zoloft Linked
        to Birth Defects

        Yaz & Yasmin – linked to heart attack, stroke, blood
        clots, and death

         

        Source: http://www.drugrecalls.com/

  • katskits

    Sorry, I normally like your program but this is ridiculous.  If I had been allowed to have medical MJ when I was a teen maybe I would have been as productive as I am FINALLY since I found a shrink who believes that THC works for severe ADD.  I finally at 44 am in school, a working artist playing in an orchestra and have a healthy wonderful marriage.  Things that just a year ago were impossible.  I take Marinol and am a productive member of society now!  

    • ChristineTatum

      Marinol. Why, that’s a medication — sold with FDA approval after a great deal of clinical study — that has been shown to have efficacy and can be precisely dosed. It’s not the raw plant. It’s actually what responsible medication derived from the ingredients of cannabis looks like. So, you’ve done a nice job of illustrating the point: we don’t need to smoke (very unhealthily) the addictive plant to research, develop and sell effective cannabis-based medications.

      • Heard It All Before

        Marinol has KILLED FOUR PEOPLE! THANKS, FDA!!!!

        You ain’t fooling anyone!

        Just look at this idiot advocating a poisonous synthetic pharmaceutical that kills!

        And what planet are you SAM idiots from that you fail to grasp that there are many other ways besides smoking that cannabis can be administered and precisely dosed? And please, no one is fooled — you can drop the lie of cannabis being addictive. no one is buying your hysterical Reefer-Madness propaganda.

  • Ncolen

    Also an addiction specialist makes his living by telling people they have a drug or drinking problem and as such should not be aloud to be involved in this conversation and if you want to stop the cartels label things to let buyers know where their pot was grown.

    • ChristineTatum

      Ah, yes. More, um, “interesting” logic. People show up in Dr. Thurstone’s clinic because they already believe they have a problem of some sort. He doesn’t initiate a relationship with them. They initiate a relationship with him. They made the appointment. 
      And let’s get real here: Dr. Thurstone — and anyone who specializes in addiction treatment — is speaking very, very outside their economic interests when they tell young people not to use marijuana. 
      But you know who ARE acting entirely within their business interests? The people (they call themselves “marijuana industry executives” and “pot barons” and “entrepreneurs”) who are working as hard and fast as they can to push marijuana into the marketplace. They know their products will be diverted at increasing rates from allegedly responsible adults to kids — and that’s how THEY score customers, er, “patients” for life.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/XOXKE3SOOSOO4USMQCJHD5JBDA Mo

    Worst interview I’ve ever heard on this program. Embarrassing and complete propaganda. Really Robin!?! No questions about what these cited studies are?? There aren’t any that support the foolish claims this clown has proffered. Very disappointing. 

    • Robin Y

      We’ll post some reporting on studies on kids and marijuana above.

      Best
      Robin 

      • Anamphibiousrodent

        Robin: you can cite stats and articles till the cows come home. Bottom line is your program failed to offer both sides of the story relating to a divisive and hotly debated topic. There is a legotimate scientific answer and reasoned opinion to every point your guests made. You failed as host to express these standpoints. I hope you do another show that allows these viewpoints to be heard. “Best” Julian

        • RCYoung

          Hello again! A gentle reminder, we were talking about kids and cannabis. if you have any studies to support that kids in general smoking marijuana is medicinal and healthy for them, which again, was the belief  that was the premise for the piece, I look forward to airing it!

          And to respond quickly to some other comments, I personally believe the wake left by the abuse of alcohol, all ages,  is a far bigger problem than marijuana. But that’s another segment. 

          SincerelyRobin 

          • ChristineTatum

            I hope you will do that follow-up, Robin. The wake caused by alcohol abuse — our nation’s third leading cause of preventable death — is bigger than the one caused by marijuana use. For now. However, the numbers are changing as we make marijuana legal and, therefore, more readily accessible and socially acceptable. All of the ridiculous insistence that “marijuana is safer” than any other addictive substance on the planet isn’t helping — and it’s that American-style, snake-oil-like marketing Dr. Thurstone is right to be very concerned about.  
            It’s also important to note that marijuana, not alcohol, is the No. 1 reason youth in the United States are admitted for substance abuse treatment — and they’re landing there at higher rates because of the growing acceptance and accessibility of this drug.In the end, we do no service to the public by comparing one substance that wrecks and ruins millions of lives to another substance that wrecks and ruins millions of lives. Marijuana is marijuana. It is not alcohol. It is not tobacco. It needs to be researched and debated very specifically. The logic that tells us, “Tobacco and alcohol sure have caused lots of harm and costly problems, so let’s add another addictive substance to our nation’s recreational lineup,” is very, very broken.

          • Fulton Barrons

            More lies, tell the truth why kids are in rehab. You would too if the judge gave you an alternative to jail, go to rehab, only thing they did was have cannabis or smoking it. Now they are addicts, give me a break.Yes lets keep spending billions of dollars on prohibition, let drug dealers make huge profits,and control the use and delivery of it.And while they are at it sell it to our teens, or something stronger. As a 40+ year user I have never touched other illegal drugs. I enjoy my cannabis as someone enjoys their wine.I also do not partake of alcohol anymore because I saw the negative effects of it.When  I drank I could be mean,not anymore. Get rid of the alcohol and cigarettes they are the dangerous drugs. Teens get these just as easy and they are regulated but no street corner dealer for these items.

          • ChristineTatum

            Our nation’s most extensive surveys of teen drug use don’t support your claims. Youth nationwide continue to report that they have easier access to alcohol and tobacco than marijuana — precisely because alcohol and tobacco are sold everywhere. And anyone who tries to tell us all our regulation of those two substances has kept those drugs out of kids’ hands must be smoking something. (University of Michigan, Monitoring the Future). Youth access to marijuana is growing because we’re making that drug more available and socially acceptable. 
            Nationally, approximately 67 percent of kids are referred to substance abuse treatment by the courts. And how did a lot of those kids wind up in front of courts? Because of their schools. They have usually done something so bad at school, that they’ve landed themselves in front of a juvi judge. And get this: a whole lot of those kids and their families are GRATEFUL for that court appearance. And why, pray tell, might that be? Because that’s how they can get substance abuse treatment paid for. Insurance generally doesn’t cover youth substance treatment — but court-referred programs do. THAT’S the real travesty.
            Clearly, you just want to smoke your weed. Go right ahead — but be adult enough to assume some semblance of responsibility to people other than yourself.

          • DTPyeahUCME

            Until science can be objective and the government allows our major research institutions to study this plant exhaustively instead of only funding studies that prove that the Nixon Administration was right, none of our government data is valid.  

            Galileo used science to prove that the sun was at the center of the solar system.  His government refused to believe it and killed him for it.  I am not saying that cannabis is the perfect plant (although it is close;-D), but rather that it is nowhere near the “devil weed” that our government has been shoving down our throats.  

            Besides, they originally outlawed this plant to kill the hemp market, which was traditionally the primary use of the cannabis (latin word for common designated by Mr. Linnaeus a long time ago) plant before forcing it underground to be tweaked and made extra-potent.  We would probably not even have 25% THC in these plants today if our government hadn’t turned hemp into marijuana.  

          • Stuka

             “Clearly, you just want to smoke your weed. Go right ahead — but be
            adult enough to assume some semblance of responsibility to people other
            than yourself.”

            Clearly you just want to dictate how everyone else in this country conducts their lives, and your hysterical retorts betray your desperation over your losing battle. Grow up and learn to behave like an adult.

          • http://www.facebook.com/people/Kevin-Hunt/100003205282238 Kevin Hunt

            “a whole lot of those kids and their families are GRATEFUL for that court appearance. ”

            You are full of sht.  No one likes to go in front of a judge for marijuana.

          • Neal Feldman

             What pretentious and pedantic tripe.

            Most sentenced to treatment for cannabis are there because of popping a positive pee test or for possession. Not for doing ‘something bad’ at school.

            Point is, prohibition is a completely failed and bankrupt policy. It has never worked on any target it has been applied to… it is just a windfall for the criminal element.

            Why is it that alcohol is legal? Wasn’t there a constitutional amendment that repealed the only constitutional amendment to ever be repealed?  Why was it repealed? Because it was a complete and spectacular failure.

            Show me how cannabis prohibition is any different.

          • Heard It All Before

             http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/09/07/marijuana-usage-down-in-t_n_1865095.html

            “To put it simply, teen marijuana usage has been going down in
            Colorado since the passage of our comprehensive medical marijuana
            regulatory model,” Mike Elliott, executive director of the Medical
            Marijuana Industry Group, told The Huffington Post. “This is exactly the
            opposite of what opponents of medical marijuana predicted. Colorado’s
            teen marijuana usage rate is going down because this regulatory model
            has taken control away from the black market and given it back to our
            school districts, local and state governments, and the citizens of
            Colorado.”

            The CDC report shows:

            Youth marijuana use in Colorado went down 2.8 percent from 2009 (24.8 percent) to 2011 (22 percent).
            Youth marijuana use nationally went up 2.3 percent from 2009 (20.8 percent) to 2011 (23.1 percent).
            In 2011, youth marijuana usage in Colorado fell below the national average — 22 percent in Colorado, 23.1 percent in the U.S.

            But the CDC report didn’t just measure youth usage, it also measured
            drug availability on Colorado school grounds. The report shows:

            Availability of drugs on school grounds in Colorado went down 5 percent from 2009 (22.7 percent) to 2011 (17.2 percent).
            Nationally, illegal drugs offered, sold or given on school property was
            up 3.1 percent from 2009 (22.7 percent) to 2011 (25.6 percent).
            Availability of illegal drugs on school grounds in Colorado is below the
            national average by 8.4 percent — 17.2 percent in Colorado, 25.6
            percent in the U.S.

          • ChristineTatum

            What you fail to understand is that the CDC reported that these numbers are statistically insignificant. And really. We have more credible, reputable sources of information to consult than the head of a marijuana industry trade group. 

          • Heard it all before

             What part of MARIJUANA USE AMONG TEENS FELL WHILE YOU WERE LYING AND BLEATING IT WAS GOING UP do you fail to understand? 

            LOVE the Argumentum Ad Hominem with your dig on Elliott.  No surprise here that you have nothing substantial to argue with. 

            Elliott was citing CDC stats. I suppose you are going to call the CDC disreputable now. You ain’t fooling anyone, sister.

          • Heard it all before

             Youth marijuana use in Colorado went down 2.8 percent from 2009 (24.8 percent) to 2011 (22 percent).Youth marijuana use nationally went up 2.3 percent from 2009 (20.8 percent) to 2011 (23.1 percent).In 2011, youth marijuana usage in Colorado fell below the national average — 22 percent in Colorado, 23.1 percent in the U.S.

            But the CDC report didn’t just measure youth usage, it also measured drug availability on Colorado school grounds. The report shows:

            Availability of drugs on school grounds in Colorado went down 5 percent from 2009 (22.7 percent) to 2011 (17.2 percent).Nationally, illegal drugs offered, sold or given on school property was up 3.1 percent from 2009 (22.7 percent) to 2011 (25.6 percent).Availability of illegal drugs on school grounds in Colorado is below the national average by 8.4 percent — 17.2 percent in Colorado, 25.6 percent in the U.S.

            What part of “Youth marijuana use in Colorado went down 2.8 percent from 2009 (24.8 percent) to 2011 (22 percent)” and “Availability of illegal drugs on school grounds in Colorado is below thenational average by 8.4 percent — 17.2 percent in Colorado, 25.6″ do you refuse to understand?

          • Stuka

             300+ Colorado physicians in 65+ cities and towns endorse Amendment 64

            More than 300 physicians from more than 65 localities across Colorado
            have endorsed Amendment 64. The campaign was joined by Dr. Larry Bedard,
            former president of the American College of Emergency Physicians, and
            Dr. Bruce Madison, former associate medical director of the faculty at
            the University of Colorado School of Medicine. The past president of the
            Colorado Medical Society, Dr. Christopher Unrein, is also among the
            physicians that have signed on in support of the initiative.

            Click here to see a full list of the physicians.

            These 300-plus physicians have joined more than 130 college professors
            in supporting Amendment 64 because the evidence is clear that our
            current system of marijuana prohibition has failed. It has not only been
            ineffective and incredibly wasteful, but also harmful to our citizens
            and our communities. Like alcohol prohibition, marijuana prohibition has
            caused far more problems than it has solved, and it is time for a new
            approach.

            The following statements were released today:

            Dr. Larry Bedard, former president of the American College of Emergency Physicians:

            “In my 35-plus years as an emergency physician, I saw hundreds of
            injuries, accidents, and deaths due to alcohol, but virtually none
            associated with marijuana. It is time to embrace a more commonsense
            policy, and stop criminalizing adults for using a substance less harmful
            than alcohol.”
             
            Dr. Bruce Madison, former associate medical director of the faculty at the University of Colorado School of Medicine:

            “As physicians we have a professional obligation to do no harm. But
            the truth is that  the Colorado marijuana laws do just that, by wasting
            hundreds of millions of dollars in a failed War on Marijuana, by ruining
            thousands of lives by unnecessary arrest and incarceration, and by
            causing the deaths of hundreds of people killed in black-market criminal
            activities. I am proud to join all of the other Colorado physicians who
            support Amendment 64, a sensible measure whose time has come.”

          • http://www.facebook.com/people/Kevin-Hunt/100003205282238 Kevin Hunt

            We are not “adding another addictive substance to our nation’s recreational lineup”.  Marijuana has been around for 5,000 years and it is not going away.  You and Doctor Pointyhead are not going to be successful at turning back the clock to the yellow journalism days of the 1920′s.  Marijuana is the safest substance on the planet.  It has yet to cause a single death from overdose or adverse reaction.  By contrast, peanuts kill 10 Americans per year.

          • Neal Feldman

             Actually you are quite full of it.

            Nice fear-mongering though. (“For now.” bum-bum-BUM cue the scary music).

            ‘Ridiculous insistence’ of the truth? Why shouldn’t the truth be insisted? Cannabis is about the safest thing on the planet… Cannabis has a zero death toll from use. Not even aspirin, caffeine or tap water can say the same.

            The one shilling snake-oil is YOU.

            They are admitted to treatment under duress by court order. They are not lining up of their own volition.  There is a significant difference.

            The comparison is entirely legitimate when the harmless substance is illegal to great social cost and the far more deadly product is legal in unlimited amounts for adult consumption.

            The hypocrisy should be obvious to anyone.

            And cannabis is NOT addictive. It lacks the chemical makeup to be addictive. 

            Psychological addiction is about the addict, not the particular subject of their given obsession.

            If you had any credible knowledge of psychology you should at least know THAT!

            And no one is ‘adding’ anything, because cannabis is already in widespread use. The biggest threat posed by cannabis use is to your liberty by the failed prohibitionist policy.

          • Fulton Barrons

            Just as all others before you. Alcohol is ingrained in our society so lets not disturb the status quo of making money while we kill people. While we are at it lets put everyone that smoke a joint in jail, if they don”t accept our rehab. This site is dangerous and should be shut down.It spews lies like they are facts, just to justify locking people up.

          • Heard it all before

             QFTMFT!

            Turdstone and his Project ShAM are just a prohibitionist government front. NO ONE IS FOOLED!

          • DTPyeahUCME

            This article was in Time magazine in 2011.  It talks about a study done where “researchers found that fatal car wrecks dropped by 9% in states that legalized medical use– which was largely attributable to a decline in drunk driving”. 

            http://healthland.time.com/2011/12/02/why-medical-marijuana-laws-reduce-traffic-deaths/#ixzz2IUIVHL2X 

            This study is done by a think tank in Germany and it looked at medical marijuana use in relation to alcohol use (Albeit is for people in their 20′s, but the results are pretty impressive.

            “Finally, the relationship between MMLs and more direct measures of alcohol consumption is examined.  Using data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System(BRFSS), we find that MMLs are associated with decreases in the number of drinks consumed, especially among 20- through 29-year-olds, providing additional evidence that alcohol is the mechanism by which traffic fatalities are reduced.  Using data from the Beer Institute, we find that beer sales fall after a MML comes into effect, suggesting that marijuana substitutes for beer, the most popular alcoholic beverage among young adults.”  

            http://ftp.iza.org/dp6112.pdf

            This is also why alcohol lobbyists are actively spending so much money on defeating these initiatives.  The money these kids are spending on pot is money they are not spending on beer.

             Moreso, there was a study done in 1993 that is often quoted by drug war enforcers, but is left incomplete (I have often had to finish their sentence for them so that we can keep it in context). 

            “Drivers under the influence of marijuana tend to over-estimate the adverse affects of the drug on their driving quality and compensate when they can; eg. by increasing effort to accomplish the task, increasing headway or slowing down, or a combination of these. Drivers under the influence of alcohol tend to under-estimate the adverse effects of the drug on their driving quality and do not invest compensatory effort.”

            http://hempshare.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/DOT-HS-808-078.pdf

          • Anamphibiousrodent

            But Robin, your guests’ citations/statistics and viewpoints bled over significantly into “facts” about “young adults/adults”. Additionally, they asserted that marijuana is generally “addictive” and is a gateway drug.  Also, your tone and language in presenting personal anecdotes and contributions to the discussion made you sound biased against marijuana. Your final citation of the kid who feels that day long pot use is therapeutic for brain cells was preposterous and a prime example of your personally stoking the fires of hyperbole. Lastly, here is my personal belief and observation: the overwhelming majority of adolescents who experiment with marijuana will not become addicted to marijuana or use it to their detriment. There will be a small minority who abuse it to their own detriment and perhaps go on to abuse other substances. I would submit that these folks suffer from a predisposition to addiction and that marijuana in and of itself is not the root problem. 

          • Neal Feldman

             There was a Norwegian group that pretty well discredited the recently touted ‘-8 to IQ’ study.

            Also a study that showed damage to brains of kids from alcohol but none from cannabis.

            Those in the various industries of the War on Some Drugs, such as the treatment industry, have a vested interest in suppressing the truth and promoting the Reefer Madness propaganda.

      • Theodore Hoppe

        Post some reports about the drugs “WE” do give our kids:
        These same “experts” have no complaints about Ritalin.  If Big Pharma was providing THC  in a pill form that could be prescribed would they, the experts, be as concerned about?  “Not!”
        “Estimates vary widely, but the total number of children on Ritalin has been estimated between 6 and 8 million children or more in 2000. The United States accounts for 90% of the world’s consumption of Ritalin, which prompted the International Narcotics Control Board to issue a warning in February of 1995 which deplored the fact that “10-12 percent of all boys between the ages of 6 and 14 in the United States have been diagnosed as having ADD and are being treated with methylphenidate [Ritalin].”  The board raised concerns about doctors’ seeking “easy” solutions to “behavioral problems which may have complex causes.” It also drew attention to the “promotional practices” that were leading to the overprescription of Ritalin in our country.”
        Additionally, let’s look at the example we set for adolescence.  Prescription are rapidly becoming the more dangerous problem for kids, and they are finding the drugs are available right under their noses.
        “Of all countries, the United States had the highest total consumption of oxycodone in 2007 at 51.6 tons (103,200 lbs) or 82% of the world total. This translates into over half a billion 80 mg tablets per year. In addition, the U.S. had the highest per capita consumption of oxycodone, followed by Canada in 2006, 2007 and 2008. This makes the consumption of oxycodone in North America (United States and Canada alone) higher than all other countries of the world combined. ”   

  • Kathy

    The teenagers being quoted are trolling you. 

  • katskits

    Illegal pot is saturated in pesticides, mold and very dirty because it isn’t regulated.  Robin!  I am just very shocked at your one sided conversation today!

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/XOXKE3SOOSOO4USMQCJHD5JBDA Mo

       That’s not always true – in fact hardly every anymore. Most pot (legal or illegal) acquired in Boston is grown within 100 miles of Boston. Since most pot now is cloned and hydroponic, there is no worry of pesticides, mold or “dirt” because it’s grown in highly controlled environments.

      • Cashmerep

        Good summary from scientific and public health perspective.  Do not smoke pot till you are at least 26 years old, and your prefrontal cortex is matured.  Also, do not be driving on our public roads under the compromise of pot.  Where is FDA in protecting food supply with pot?

  • Tjanuskiewiecz

    I thought this was very one sided the people you intervied hadnt a clue of what they were talking about this was a joke. As is regulation on a plant that when compared to alcohol tobacco or prescription drugs is almost harmless… Why does weed scare people so much and why does someone else care if i or anyone else choose to smoke pot?

  • Rlupodimare

    For me this is old news, but Dr. Thurstone is on the mark. His information is somewhat dated. I first read about this item in Bill Bennett’s book High Society – the part on brain development of the young, however, I am convinced that marijuana also effects adults in the areas of memory including making common sense daily decisions. My ex was addicted to marijuana (still is) this is the reason we have been divorced for over twenty years. Marijuana has dramatically affected (through my ex’s influence) my children lives. I believe marijuana is one of the major contributors to bi-polar disorder including schizophrenia. It is not by some accident that most shooter’s which seem to be young, have mental disorders. So what is driving the legalization of marijuana? – Big money…… very big money.

    • katskits

      That is one of the most absurd things I have ever heard.  There is no evidence that all of these young shooters used pot!!!  More than likely they were on big pharma drugs and that’s where the money trail is.   Where is your evidence or study that pot causes bi-polar and schizophrenia, which are soo far apart on the symptom spectrum that you can’t lump them together at all.  Just because your ex was an addict  chose to abuse pot doesn’t give you a scientific view into medical MJ’s effect on memory and making decisions.

      • Fulton Barrons

        Also point out that the malady of schizophrenia has stayed constant,1% of populace for over 80 years.

    • tleisman

      It’s somewhat fitting in a way because the original motive behind criminalizing the cultivation of hemp was money for American corn over Mexican hemp… Hemp and pot use were racialized and stigmatized which has prevented effective research on the effects of marijuana use for years and years.

      No question pot use has many varying effects both good and bad but can we conclusively say the negative effects are worse than the side effects of many prescription drugs? Not conclusively. On the other side, people who say pot is harmless and not addictive contribute nothing but ignorance to this debate. I am sorry drug use negatively affected your life but your reference to “most shooters” as “young, have mental disorders” is completely irrelevant and not based in facts.

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/XOXKE3SOOSOO4USMQCJHD5JBDA Mo

       You make some fatuous claims! Please read Dr. Lester Grinspoon of Harvard on marijuana. Marijuana is easier to quit than coffee and much easier than tobacco. Addiction is relative. A day of dullness and slight edgyness. Grinspoon points out that in his (medical) experience, pot outperforms every drug ever prescribed for the treatment of mania associated with bi-polar disorder.

      People abuse Aderall. Should that be illegal? People abuse oxy-codone. Should that be illegal? Pot grows naturally and can be a very helpful tool for those willing to self medicate an variety of maladies.

      The problems that you are experiencing with your wife and perhaps others, is that you don’t want to see what it is that’s being medicated. Perhaps using pot like alcohol (to forget?) is the use intended by those you’ve experienced. The symptoms are only a result of the illness and you can’t cure a cold by taking away someone’s Nyquill.

      Pot absolutely has many positive uses medicinally and socially and that is the conversation that we should be having, not the imagined or boogey man bad stuff that the Fox Noise types have been fed by large Pharma to keep people dependent on their “legal” elixers.

    • Dr.G

      Key word “I believe”

      Once you know something, report back. Your beliefs are your own problem.

    • Fulton Barrons

      You have it wrong it is not big money driving legalization. It is the mere thought of all the money spent on a failed policy. Find the Documentary called Breaking the Taboo and learn a little. Our government spends billions to fight this war which is totally about cannabis no other drugs. If we were worried about the drugs we would put better controls on our prescription use. Sorry to hear about your ex but i’m sure it was not all her fault as your attitude toward cannabis could have created a negative atmosphere. You also have not said if you have a drinking problem, which is the cause of a lot of divorces.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Kevin-Hunt/100003205282238 Kevin Hunt

      I stopped taking you seriously when I saw your endorsement of Thurstone and Bennett.

      The school shooters were on pharmaceuticals, not marijuana.

      * Aurora shooter James Holmes, who murdered 12 people and injured 58 in a movie theatre, was on prescription meds —the names of these medications have been redacted from court documents.* Columbine (April 20, 1999) mass-killer Eric Harris was taking Luvox® (Fluvoxamine maleate)* Patrick Purdy, who murdered five children and wounded 30 at Cleveland Elementary School in San Diego, on January 17, 1989, was using Amitriptyline (an antidepressant), as well as the antipsychotic drug Thorazine.* Kip Kinkel, 15, murdered his parents and then opened fire on his classmates at Thurston High School in Springfield, Oregon, May, 1998, killing two and wounding 22 others. He had been prescribed both Prozac and Ritalin.* In 1988, 31-year-old Laurie Dann went on a shooting rampage in a second-grade classroom in Winnetka, Illinois, killing one child and wounding six. She had been taking the antidepressant Anafranil as well as Lithium.* In Paducah, Ky., in late 1997, 14-year-old Michael Carneal, traveled to Heath High School and started shooting students in a prayer meeting taking place in the school’s lobby, killing three and leaving another paralyzed. Carneal reportedly was on Ritalin.* Jeff Weise, living on Minnesota’s Red Lake Indian Reservation, shot and killed nine people and wounded five others before killing himself. Weise had been taking Prozac.* Joseph T. Wesbecker, just a month after he began taking Prozac in 1989, shot 20 workers at Standard Gravure Corp. in Louisville, Ky., killing nine. Prozac-maker Eli Lilly later settled a lawsuit brought by survivors.

    • enchentez

      Liar! Big Money drives PROHIBITION! Big Monwy like the US Government! And the prison industry! and the police unions who benefit from “confiscated” – meaning government-STOLED– property! And Big Alcohol, who stand to lose vast amounts of profits!

  • Marcee

    I believe that there are good studies showing the changes to the adolescent brain by drug use including marijuana but would have liked the conversation to also touch that such studies also exist for commonly used and accepted medications for anxiety, depression, ADHD. It would be interested to hear a little more in depth of medications and children in general if your going to talk about it in relation to marijuana. 

  • myname

    so glad to hear reporting on this problem. we found a year ago our 17 yo was using. nobody seems to believe the effects it has on development. we’ve seen it and we’ve already seen an overdose…supposedly caused by ‘spice’ . I wish some of these comments could experience what we have and then write.

    • Dr.G

      Who is advocating for teenage marijuana use? The effects on brain development in children are clear. They shouldn’t do it. Their brains are still developing. Who are you talking to who doesn’t believe that? They should do some reading. 

      Please don’t mix Spice up with marijuana. It is a synthetic nightmare that we are seeing as an epidemic in the ER. Same goes for K2 and Bathsalts. Totally different things. 

      • Fulton Barrons

        Dr. G you speak the truth. I agree 100%. Regulate to keep teens from accessing, that’s the way to keep them from getting it regularly.

        • ChristineTatum

          Kind of like regulating cigarettes and alcohol, huh? That sure has kept those substances out of kids’ hands. 

          • Stuka

             A whole lot more than prohibition has.

          • ChristineTatum

            Actually, not at all. Our nation’s most extensive surveys of adolescent substance use (including Monitoring the Future, University of Michigan), historically have shown that adolescents nationwide report it is much easier for them to access tobacco and alcohol, which are illegal, than marijuana, which is illegal. There has been an increase in ease of access to marijuana, sure — and it is largely attributed to states that have made the drug more available through some form of legalization. 

          • Heard it all before

             Wow, you just want to have it both ways, don’t you?  That’s how it is with pathological liars. The CDC stats put the lie to your claim of increased ease of access under regulation.

          • ChristineTatum

            The CDC data don’t reflect a drop in adolescent use, and they certainly don’t demonstrate any causal relationship with regulation, which has been exceedingly poor in Colorado. You need to study up: http://drthurstone.com/jumping-to-conclusions-with-cdc-data. One thing many people championing legalization like to overlook when trumpeting these numbers is that the data could reflect a flat line because 85 Colorado communities BANNED dispensaries. 

          • Heard it all before

            LMAO please don’t insult our intelligence by referring us to your lying husband’s propaganda-disinformation site. I’ve seen it, it’s horseshit. For crying out loud, the idiot still believes that long-debunked “gateway drug” nonsense.

            You just massage and cherry-pick the data however you want to, to get it to look like you want it, to you.  You certainly don’t look at “other factors” when they go against your bias — like the debunked New Zealand study. You can lie to yourselves all day. No one is fooled.

          • Heard It All Before

            FROM THE CDC REPORT:

            Youth marijuana use in Colorado went down 2.8 percent from 2009 (24.8 percent) to 2011 (22 percent).
            Youth marijuana use nationally went up 2.3 percent from 2009 (20.8 percent) to 2011 (23.1 percent).
            In 2011, youth marijuana usage in Colorado fell below the national average — 22 percent in Colorado, 23.1 percent in the U.S.

            But the CDC report didn’t just measure youth usage, it also measured
            drug availability on Colorado school grounds. The report shows:

            Availability of drugs on school grounds in Colorado went down 5 percent from 2009 (22.7 percent) to 2011 (17.2 percent).
            Nationally, illegal drugs offered, sold or given on school property was
            up 3.1 percent from 2009 (22.7 percent) to 2011 (25.6 percent).
            Availability of illegal drugs on school grounds in Colorado is below the
            national average by 8.4 percent — 17.2 percent in Colorado, 25.6
            percent in the U.S.

            WHAT PART OF “Youth marijuana use in Colorado went down 2.8 percent from 2009 (24.8 percent) to 2011 (22 percent)” AND “Availability of illegal drugs on school grounds in Colorado is below the national average by 8.4 percent — 17.2 percent in Colorado, 25.6
            percent in the U.S.” DO YOU REFUSE TO UNDERSTAND?

            Jeebus, the willful ignorance around here is stinking up the place something awful….

    • http://www.facebook.com/thefreeradical David Fleischmann

      Kids use Spice, which can kill them, because of the ban on cannabis, which cannot.  The existence of a deadly pot-substitute like Spice is the direct result of the prohibition of cannabis and the drug war.  Ban one substance, and two more pop up to take its place.  The only and best way to protect children is to deal with these substances openly and maturely, to legalize and regulate the market for cannabis.

    • Fulton Barrons

      Sir if your daughter was using spice that is just another problem with the prohibitionist attitude. She used it because the real thing wasn’t available and it was said to be legal substitute. I agree this product is dangerous, as is any fake product.Her overdose was with what ever they put in that spice drug.It may have been a THC overdose, very rare, but if you use Marinol, which is 100% THC you could spike.But Marinol is a class 3 drug and legal. Now do you see the hypocrisy of prohibition. Our pharma can synthesize a molecule, make it 100% THC, and prescribe it and let someone drive on it. In cannabis the plant has other cannabinoids that help with the overdose of THC. That is why you cannot just take one part of the plant and make medicine.This is Big Pharma’s idea, to make fake drugs to ruin our bodies,kill your liver, pancreas, intestines and then make one to help repair them.

  • Tom B.

    As the father of a 15 year old ADHD teen who began smoking pot in 6th grade, and whose personality changes when he has smoked, I can say that — in our experience — it IS addictive for young people. The potency is way higher, and despite all measures that we’ve taken that normally would hit home with most kids, he cannot stop smoking. He says it helps him to socialize and sleep.  While obviously there is an element of self medication (ADHD) and teen “coolness” in this, the addictive potential is clear. Some of his friends who are “longtime” users (3-4 years) are now taking medication for depression. I encourage all those who feel it is not harmful to teens to spend some time actually looking up and reading the many clinical reports out there and talking to doctors and nurses in ER wards. While legalization may not be a bad thing overall, this is a serious issue for young teens and an education effort must be put in place — hopefully with tax dollars on legal pot sales.

    • Dr.G

      No teenager should be using marijuana unless there is an extreme medical exception.  Nor should they be smoking nicotine. Or drinking alcohol. Or using Percocet/Vicodin/Hydro/Oxy/MS, etc. duh. 

      • whatEVER

        I think you are the first “dr.”  I have met who has used the word duh.  Hmm…makes me a little suspicious.  

    • ChristineTatum

      I’m so sorry to read this about your son and his friends. Marijuana is addictive — reputable scientists don’t even debate this anymore — and the substance’s use during adolescence is associated with depression, psychosis and suicide. 
      I agree this is a serious issue for young people and their families and that we need far more education about marijuana — but there’s little reason to believe tax dollars will come remotely close to covering the costs of that education and social problems caused by the drug’s use. For reference, we need look no further than the alcohol and tobacco industries. For every $1 our state and federal governments collect in taxes on those substances, we spend $10 on problems associated with their use. Marijuana isn’t likely to be any different. 

      • Fulton Barrons

        Christine you say it won’t be any different but have no proof other than  here say. The stats you quote are for substances that are legal,and destructive  and if Cannabis were as destructive, we would have seen a big swarm of people going to hospitals, because we have close to 25 million users in the country. I haven”t seen this happening , as a matter of fact neither have you.

        • ChristineTatum

          When you use the drug — as you cited you do above — I suppose it’s easy to miss these disturbing trends and research findings: 
          Cannabis is the No. 1 reason why youth in the United States are admitted to substance abuse treatment. 
          Data from the National Institute on Drug Abuse found that in 1993, marijuana comprised about 8 percent of all treatment admissions — but by 2009, that number had increased to 18 percent. For those under the age of 18, marijuana-related treatment admissions increased by 188 percent from 1992 to 2006, while admissions of for use of other drugs remained steady. (Sources: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2009. Office of Applied Studies. “Treatment Episode Data Set: 2009 Dischargers from Substance Abuse Treatment Services.” Also see “Non-medical cannabis: Rite of Passage or Russian Roulette?,” 2011. Columbia University)
          Notice that these studies examine data sets leading up to 2009. Why is that important? Because the percentages are likely to have risen much more the last four years. It was 2009 that triggered the start of the boom of so-called “medical” marijuana dispensaries in some states. 

          • DTPyeahUCME

            Are they going to a substance abuse treatment program because they need to get treatment or is it because of the court system?  Judges will often sentence people to treatment over incarceration.  Judges will also expunge or reduce the sentence if the individual goes to treatment as well.  Again, it is the government using their system to bolster their numbers and give us skewed data.  Here is a report done in a very aggressive prohibition state that shows that “Some 69% of cannabis admissions were involved with the criminal justice system, including those who had a legal status (awaiting trial, diverted to treatment, on probation, parole, or in jail) and those referred to treatment from a criminal justice source (probation, parole, police, or courts). Referral sources for non-coerced admissions included self (20%), social services or protective services (26%), community mental health centers (8%), family or friends (6%), or local councils on alcohol and drugs (6%).”
            http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/7/111

          • Stuka

             “Cannabis is the No. 1 reason why youth in the United States are FORCED  to substance abuse INDOCTRINATION. ”

            fixed that for ya.

          • http://www.facebook.com/people/Kevin-Hunt/100003205282238 Kevin Hunt

            So NIDA is a credible source?  It seems that they are only interested in creating dangerous alternatives to safe, natural cannabis.

            ” But many may be surprised to learn that some of the most commonly used formulas for “synthetic marijuana” were created by an American professor conducting research for the National Institute on Drug Abuse (drugabuse.gov).
             
            Former Clemson University chemistry professor Dr. John W. Huffman is the namesake of JWH-018, JWH-073 and JWH-200, three of the synthetic cannabinoids banned by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration in 2011.
             
            “The National Institute of Drug Abuse wanted to research marijuana,” said Dr. Victor Tuckler, the emergency room toxicologist at Interim LSU Public Hospital in New Orleans. “They were looking at different receptors of the brain to see if they could come up with a way that people wouldn’t get addicted to this stuff.”
             
            “Who knows how this got out,” Tuckler said. “Pretty soon, it’s on the Internet and people are making it over in China.”
             
            http://www.nola.com/crime/index.ssf/2012/07/clemson_university_professor_c.html    

      • Stuka

         “Marijuana is addictive — reputable scientists don’t even debate this anymore ”

        Bald-faced LIE.

        “For every $1 our state and federal governments collect in taxes on those
        substances, we spend $10 on problems associated with their use.”

        Um what was that you were saying about CITING YOUR SOURCES?  I love how you Propaganda ScAMers make yup your own “facts” as you go along. in the Real World we call this “pathological lying”.

    • CoDoc442

      I am sorry to hear about your son…..it is not an uncommon story unfortunately.  There are plenty of peer-reviewed literature to support exactly what has happened to your son and the American public truly needs to hear and become aware of the potential harms marijuana has for our youth.  Good luck to you and your family and I hope things will work out for the best for you and your family.

    • Fulton Barrons

      It sounds like you have the problem. First,Is it better to have your child on Ridlin or other medicines for his ADHD that he has to take everyday. Second be a parent not a prohibitionist, embrace his choice and help him slow down on use that way. Also he has no more addictive behavior than if he had to be on Big Pharma medicine. His friends are taking medicine for depression because that”s why they were smoking in the first place, DEPRESSION. They didn”t get it from smoking Cannabis. I am a long time user of 40+ years, held down a good job for 36 yrs. retired and enjoy my life. I’m not a looser, have had six children, have 12 grand children, and when my kids grew up I told them as much truth then as I knew. I have only one child that smokes cannabis the others took to alcohol and cigarettes, and suffer from their choice constantly. Myself I’m very fit at 59, don’t get the flu. or sick at all. The doctor told me my immune system was excellent, lots of antibodies. So much for the bad side effects.

  • GH

    Some tetchy comments here. Apparently nothing kills your buzz quicker than science

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Kevin-Hunt/100003205282238 Kevin Hunt

      Nothing kills your buzz faster than getting shot in a botched drug raid.  The hemp ban is not ‘protective of public health and safety’.  Prohibition causes violence. Citizens have the right to be outraged.

      Jose Guerana, an Iraq war veteran was gunned down by an AZ SWAT team who was trying to reach their quota of drug raids. No drugs were found. The officers denied paramedics access to their victim and allowed Guerena to bleed to death in front of his 4 year old son. http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/news/2011/11/27/swat-team-shooting-marine-jose-guerena-ortiz-provokes-rage/ 

  • Gusbailey

    Totally biased report. People concerned with teen health should focus on alcohol and tobacco which is thousands of times more harmful and addictive than marijuana is.  How do I get that statistic?  Over half a million people die from alcohol and tobacco use each year and no one dies from pot.  Get out of the way you drug warriors,  legalization is just , and is coming to a state near you soon!

  • guest

    I know a pregnant teen who is smoking marijuana. She kept searching the internet for studies on the effects on the developing fetus, but since she didn’t find any, she assumed that it’s safe. What studies are there and how can I find them. 

    • Michel

      That child will have ADD and developmental issues. Please press upon her that the risks are real for a fetus.

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/XOXKE3SOOSOO4USMQCJHD5JBDA Mo

       Smoking anything when you’re pregnant is bad. Coffee is bad. Alcohol is bad. Fish is bad. Lots is bad when you’re pregnant.

      That said, anecdotally, if this pregnant teen were able to view marijuana in the totality of their life and understand what it is that it contributes to or inhibits in her life, then maybe she could make an informed decision about whether what negligible risks exist with other kinds of marijuana use, she might find it to be worth it for her.

      In other words, if she takes it via a lollypop or cookie and it reduces high stress (pregnant teen, right?) then maybe the reduced stress level out weighs the risk of thc to the fetus, which for anyone who enjoys pot occasionally is obvious, is low health and developmental wise.

    • Dr.G

      Can you tell her that anything she wouldn’t put in her newborn she shouldn’t put in her own body. Would she blow pot smoke in her newborn’s face? If so please open the adoption conversation with her 

    • Robin Y

      Please see New York Times early use article above.

      Best
      Robin

  • Michel

    I found this to be a very frustrating report. Robin, your opening statement about the study referenced, “leaves very little wiggle room” is a departure from your typical high reporting standards. This report only recently came out, and already there are significant doubts being cast. The dip in IQ described has also been observed when looking at other risk factors, such as lower socio-economic status, alcohol use, and high levels of stress.

    Please continue to conduct these important conversations in a balanced objective manner.

    • maxwood

      The sources cited by Michel are correct but miss another point: prohibition puts a premium on concealing one’s use, therefore kids HIDE AWAY  from classroom, library, mentors, employers, worksites– anyplace where there is a learning opportunity– and those who are “heaviest” users are absenting themselves the most.  Result years later: ignorance showing up as “lower IQ”.

  • Dr.G

    I am a physician listener and am very disappointed as a long-time NPR listener to have heard this sub-standard “journalism” on my beloved station. Your panel was completely unbalanced and forwarded their unsubstantiated anti-marijuana propaganda without any chance for rebuttal. 

    I tried to call in but no one picked up the phone. 

    I am amazed that the gateway myth is being furthered by your “scientists.” This has been shown over and over to be UNTRUE. 

    Further, you lump marijuana use at the beginning of the show with increased drug busts. Well, what were these drug busts for? You can not pin all drug busts on marijuana. That is where the journalism part comes in. Do your research and don’t just say something because it is salacious and will pique your reader’s interest. 

    I’m interested in Katie’s methodology. What schools did she visit? How did she pick the kids to talk to? Did she go to the back of the bleachers at lunch time? Those kids were there when *I* was in High School. Further, all of your personal vignettes are irrelevant in the big picture and do not get us any farther to the truth than my personal vignettes do. Do some real research. 

    The High School student who stated that marijuana is healthier than alcohol IS RIGHT!!! I’ve been an ER doctor for 12 years, trust me, marijuana has nothing on good ‘ole EtOH. No ond HAS ever died from marijuana. THis is not to say that teenagers should be using it, absolutely not! Instead of hiding it, though, and scaring people away who could benefit from it let’s use our critical thinking and teaching skills and debunk the reefer madness myth. 

    Enough it enough!!! The least you owe your readers is a re-do with some real panelists.  

    • Erighi

      Well said. Thank you!

    • ChristineTatum

      Dr. G, we look forward to reviewing citations from the medical literature that support your claims. In the meantime, people wanting to know more about what the latest, top cannabis research tells us can find a good summary on Dr. Thurstone’s website: http://drthurstone.com/what-latest-top-cannabis-research-tells-us 
      This review of the medical literature was prepared by Bertha Madras, professor of psychobiology at Harvard Medical School’s Department of Psychiatry. 

      • Heard It All Before

         ….says the yap dog for the organization (Project ShAM) that spews endless Gish-Gallops of long-debunked Anslinger-Nixonian propaganda, disinformation, and  Big Lies — plus a host of new ones of their own.

        • ChristineTatum

          Writes someone from the cowardly shadows of anonymity who resorts to name-calling and more silly word-slinging because/he she can’t come up with any of the citations requested.

          • Heard It All Before

            In other words you have no defense at all to the charges of misrepresentation, propagandizing with long-debunked hysterical reefer-madness disinformation, and outright lying.  Check.

          • http://www.facebook.com/people/Kevin-Hunt/100003205282238 Kevin Hunt

            Alcohol kills 20,000 Americans per year.

            Marijuana kills zero.

          • Heard It All Before

             LOL how funny that you are trying to get people’s names.  This is the
            Interwebz,
            sister, where people can speak freely without your warpig handlers
            sending goon squads to incinerate our children. Deal with it

          • http://twitter.com/HempShare HempShare

            People who discuss smoking Cannabis are obvious shills.

            ALL benefits of the medicine can be realized without smoking anything.

            To convert the NON PSYCHO-ACTIVE, psycho-tropic Cannabinoid delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinolic-ACID (THCA) into PSYCHO-ACTIVE delta-9-tetrahydrocannbinol (THC) THCA needs to be heated between 108-190 Celcius. Peaking around 140-160 Celius.

            Dehydration also  Decarboxylates the THCA, but heating apparently takes it to the next level.

            So effectively, there are three ways to administer Natural Cannabinoid Medicine:

            1) Eat RAW Cannabis

            2) Eat RAW Decarboxylated Cannabis

            3) Smoke Cannabis

            Vaporizing would have a similar effect to Smoking without the carbon-based intake from smoking.

            Smoking and Vaporizing appear to effect the CB1 – Cannabinoid Receptors in the Brain moreso, whereas ingesting seems to effect the CB2-Cannabinoid Receptors in the peripheral cells more.

            I have taken the medicine in all these forms for Ulcerative Colitis. There is no question RAW Cannabis is the most effective to suppress ALL symptoms. Decarboxylated seems to do very well, and smoking does okay, but you seem to suppress the thoughts about it which goes right along with the PTSD findings.

            Cannabis is a miraculous plant. There is only ONE reason it IS illegal.

            Money & Greed.

            Look your ‘self’ in the mirror and tell your ‘self’ what you’re afraid of.

            It isn’t this plant.

            Anyone care to debate me. Bring it on. I am alive today and cancer free for ONE reason.

            Hemp. I take no other Medicine.

        • http://www.facebook.com/people/Kevin-Hunt/100003205282238 Kevin Hunt

          You are right.. all I hear from them is Yap Yap Yap.

          Richard Nixon appointed Raymond Shafer as the head of a commission to determine how marijuana should be regulated pursuant to the passage of the CSA of 1970.  On March 22, 1972, Mr. Shafer presented a report to Congress and the public entitled “Marijuana, A Signal of Misunderstanding”. The Commission concluded that marijuana users “are essentially indistinguishable from their non-marijuana using peers by any fundamental criterion other than their marijuana use.” They found that, “Neither the marijuana user nor the drug itself can be said to constitute a danger to public safety.” The Commission recommended “Decriminalization of possession of marijuana for personal use on both the state and federal levels.”Raymond Shafer was a decorated WWII veteran and the Republican Governor of Pennsylvania from 1967-1971.

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Kevin-Hunt/100003205282238 Kevin Hunt

        Thurstone is a fraud and so are you.  Once you can justify why citizens should be subjected to same-sex body cavity searches for marijuana, we can talk about why we should prolong the agony of the war on drugs.

        “Ashley
        Dobbs and aunt Angel Dobbs are suing female state trooper Kelley Helleson, who
        administered the  body cavity searches
        [looking for marijuana] with the same latex glove, and trooper David Farrell.
        The body cavity searches took place near Irving, TX in July after someone
        allegedly threw a cigarette from the window of their vehicle.”

         

        http://www.nydailynews.com/news/crime/humiliating-cavity-search-traffic-stop-sparks-suit-article-1.1223901

    • CoDoc442

      And your ER experience qualifies you as an expert? Go to the library and come back when you know something. Anectdotal experience doesn’t qualify you as knowing what you are talking about. There is a colossal problem in Colorado. The number of MVC fatalities with MJ involved doubled in the state between ’06-’10. EtOH related fatalities remained the same if not declined.

      • enchentez

        And your having an internet connection and a big mouth qualifies you as an expert? VERY persuading…

        • http://www.facebook.com/people/Kevin-Hunt/100003205282238 Kevin Hunt

          CoDoc is a “Doc” only in their own mind.

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Kevin-Hunt/100003205282238 Kevin Hunt

        I went to the library and came back with something.

        “Comparing traffic deaths over time in states with and without
        medical marijuana law changes, the researchers found that fatal car wrecks
        dropped by 9% in states that legalized medical use.”

         

        Source: Medical Marijuana Laws, Traffic Fatalities, and Alcohol
        Consumption  by D. Mark Anderson,
        Daniel I. Rees (November 2011) 

    • Stuka

       @Dr.G: “I am amazed that the gateway myth is being furthered by your “scientists.” This has been shown over and over to be UNTRUE. ”

      QFTMFT.

      But please, Dr. Thurstone, don’t let FACTS get in the way of your hysterical propaganda campaign.

  • Martin in Kansas City

    I couldn’t tell if I was listening to NPR or to a twenty minute DEA propaganda piece. That was perhaps the most one-sided story I have ever heard from an ostensibly objective news organization or show. You had an “addiction specialist” who had just a *slight* vested interest in the continued criminalization and stigmatization of marijuana use (read: his livelihood), as well as a public health reporter who gave interesting anecdotes of seemingly stupid high school kids (wow, imagine that, dumb high school kids saying dumb things) but with ZERO hard data about the effects this alleged epidemic of teen marijuana use has had on grades, high school completion, college acceptance or completion rates, post-graduation success, etc. Where was the counter viewpoint?

    Oh, and for the record, the study cited by the” addiction specialist” regarding lower IQs associated with pot use by those between 13 and 38 has been heavily criticized for being distinctly methodologically flawed – read here: http://www.salon.com/2013/01/15/actually_pot_may_not_lower_iq_after_all/

    What a truly warped hit piece – one not becoming a purportedly objective, taxpayer-supported news organization like NPR. You barely mentioned the destruction that marijuana prohibition has wrought in the lives of even teenagers arrested for possession, not to mention homes torn apart by parents being hauled to jail for simple possession. You also gave extremely short shrift to the one, overarching fact surrounding the decision of the people of Colorado: they weighed the risks and benefits of legalizing marijuana, despite protestations from myriad vested interests like your guest, and decided that the prohibition laws were more harmful than marijuana; deal with the people’s decision.

    Further, every assertion was greeted with near glee by the host, and any “hard” questions or any counter to the spin given by the guests was non-existent. This was a softball interview along the lines of Rand Paul appearing on Hannity. 

    You should be ashamed of yourselves. Not worthy of NPR.

    • okitaris

      Thanks for your piece.   You have to know that the ruling class is not going to allow a loose cannon in the all important media.     One must know that there is a tacit agreement between the ruling class between the media and the government that the privateers own the media and all the information from the government is filtered through it.     Think of it this way you have an important job and that all you do you must tell some one else who then tells the public.

    • Mark

      Martin your right on, I don’t know why you negatively bring up Rand Paul, his father for sure and I would think Rand too would agree with what you wrote, it the traditional liberals and conservatives who want to keep the Drug War going 

  • Theodore Hoppe

    First off, let’s admit that the “War on Drugs” was a miserable failure that criminalize thousands upon thousands of youths. The pendulum is bound to swing the other way.   

    Let’s ask the bigger question that the experts forget to ask, “Why do kids want to self medicate in the first places?”  The experts incorrectly assume recreational  use when it comes to drugs and alcohol. Almost never is self medication listed as a cause, despite the evidence about high rates of teen suicide and mental problems.  What is needed are studies that look for co occurring conditions that underline drug and alcohol usage in teens. 
     My studies indicate that addiction only occurs in a small percentage of the “user” population, around 20%.  Most individual manage to self-regulate in cases where the rewards of drugs are counter balanced by the other rewards and motivations( Heyman). What’s different about this 20%?
     Addiction is about short term gratification.   Studies such as the famous “Marshmallow Experiment” indicates that only a small number of child this posses the traits of delayed gratification by age five, and I’ll note that we do very little to develop this trait in children which may account for some addictions.http://www.ted.com/talks/joachim_de_posada_says_don_t_eat_the_marshmallow_yet.html
    I could go on but you get the point; this is a complex issue, one that is not as simple as the experts would have us believe.  But I will add this,  we know that in combat zones where we send trained soldiers the rates of alcohol use, drug use, and suicide climbs.  What is it in our society that feels like a combat zone to adolescence?

  • Walter Holstad

    I thought the piece was biased too. It was one sided and the studies they cited went back to the 80s when anti-marijuana sentiment was at it’s peak arguably. There are studies that can claim just about anything. I’ve never heard of marijuana addiction seriously proffered by scientists before.  

  • CounselorK

    Listening to the program earlier I found myself becoming
    increasingly agitated. The reason for my agitation was the hypocrisy I heard.
    Let me explain; I have been a behavioral health professional for over twenty
    years. In those years I worked in hospitals, outpatient centers, mobile crisis
    response and now private practice. In that time I have seen it become a
    prevalent practice to prescribe children psychiatric medication for diagnosis
    such as; bipolar disorder, depression, anxiety, schizoaffective disorder and
    even personality disorders. I have witnessed as psychiatrists have prescribed medications
    such as valium and lithium to as young as 8 years old! So my point about
    hypocrisy, if we accept that marijuana can affect the development of a young
    mind, what of lithium/ Have we even asked this question or is it blatantly
    ignored because it falls in the “legal” and “prescribed” categories? By the
    way, how much profits do pharmaceutical companies make off of the medications prescribed
    to juveniles. I challenge people to look up the pharmaceutical companies’
    profits last fiscal year. In conclusion, how can we teach children that a pill
    can cure their sadness and discomfort and turn around and blame it all on
    marijuana when that child becomes addicted? Perhaps marijuana is not the true
    gateway drug?

  • http://www.facebook.com/johan.mathiesen Johan Mathiesen

    Here and Now

    Thursday, January 17, 2013

    Some notes about the issue of marijuana and kids:

    This morning you had a couple people discussing the situation in Colorado. One was a man from Colorado who is on a commission to write the implementation of the new legalization laws there. He was, obviously, not in favor of legalization—which made him a curious choice for the body tasked with implementation—which is fine, except that he was disingenuous with his arguments.

    For one thing, he repeatedly said that he didn’t want to see a repeat of the debacle with tobacco which, he pointed out, is still a leading cause of death nationally. I.e. he equated marijuana with tobacco—mind-altering substances that are smoked—even though just a few minutes earlier in your program it was pointed out that there have been no deaths attributed to marijuana, ever. Nonetheless, he stuck with equating the two.

    His solution to the issue was equally biased and unthoughtful. He suggested fines and treatment programs for marijuana users rather than incarceration; but that still sees marijuana use as strictly a public health issue and not a personal liberty issue. If he were truly concerned about the public health aspects and thought that some form of criminalization of marijuana still necessary, then he would truly turn his attention first to the real killers: tobacco and alcohol. He would be asking for a return of prohibition.

    By focusing on marijuana as a public health issue and using its dangers as an excuse for prohibition, you miss the central point that it is, in reality, a social issue. It has nothing to do with protecting the public; it has everything to do with imposing one’s values on others. It’s sanctimonious. (How far away from Colorado schools do bars and stores that sell tobacco have to be?) The gentleman assumed that use of marijuana was always harmful and anyone using it should be subject to fines and/or treatment. There’s nothing scientific and everything pious about that attitude. (For example, he said adolescent marijuana users are more likely to suffer mental problems later in life; implying that marijuana was a cause and not a correlation. Bad science; worse politics. What’s the rate for Ritalin users?)

    There are reasonable issues in protecting children from all manner of drugs, but making them illegal is a cultural question, not one of public safety. You as a radio produced disseminating information have a duty to make that clear to your audience.

    As a final aside, the question was brought up as to what would be the effect of legalization on the cartels. The answer given—not much—was accurate in the short run but obfuscating. The long run effects are likely to be much more severe. For a long time the cartels have seen their percent of the marijuana business fade as medical marijuana growers have proliferated in this country. There is every reason to believe this will continue as legalization spreads across the states. The cartels make most of their profits on other drugs. What will bring the cartels down is the legalization of all drugs in Mexico, which is on the table at present. It would probably be wisest to assume that, eventually, drugs will be legalized in Mexico as it’s the only way they’ll be able to defeat the cartels. Conceivably, drugs could be legalized in Mexico before they are in the U.S.

    Smoke a bowl for me,

    Johan Mathiesen
    Portland, OR

    • maxwood

      Good point about fines and treatment centers!  The fines are promoted as more humane than incarceration and a blacklisting police record; but what they really do is add to the already immense (at least 10-1) PRICE DIFFERENTIAL between cannabis and cigarette tobacco, leading kids who have to “smoke something to look kool” to choose the cheaper but deadlier herb and get hooked, BENEFITING GUESS WHICH BIG CORPORATIONS.

      “Treatment centers” are a nifty way of getting the taxpayer to hire more high-paid “experts” to patrol and control the children– compare that with LaPierre’s glorious suggestion to put a GUN-armed guard in every school, paid to carry a $600 weapon and stand watching over the kids waiting for something to happen.

  • Theodore Hoppe

    “You dad…..I get it from you!”
    These same “experts” have no complaints about Ritalin.  If Big Pharma was providing THC  in a pill form that could be prescribed would they, the experts, be as concerned about?  “Not!”
    “Estimates vary widely, but the total number of children on Ritalin has been estimated between 6 and 8 million children or more in 2000. The United States accounts for 90% of the world’s consumption of Ritalin, which prompted the International Narcotics Control Board to issue a warning in February of 1995 which deplored the fact that “10-12 percent of all boys between the ages of 6 and 14 in the United States have been diagnosed as having ADD and are being treated with methylphenidate [Ritalin].”  The board raised concerns about doctors’ seeking “easy” solutions to “behavioral problems which may have complex causes.” It also drew attention to the “promotional practices” that were leading to the overprescription of Ritalin in our country.”

  • ockitaris

    The major problem with marijauna and all other illegal drugs are that they are used to make money all of them should be legal but buying or selling of all the now illegal drugs should be illegal.     The true gageway drug is money/profits which allows some of us to live extravagently with out working

  • http://www.facebook.com/thefreeradical David Fleischmann

    And why shouldn’t kids, or anyone else, think that smoking cannabis is healthy?  In the sense that it may replace the use of alcohol, tobacco, or prescription painkillers, which are highly deadly, pot is definitely healthy.  In the sense that stress can cause heart attacks and strokes, yes smoking weed to relieve it can be very healthy. In the sense that eating food is necessary to sustain life, using some herb to stimulate the appetite is a healthy choice.  Sleep being necessary for health, using cannabis as a sleep aid is beneficial to health.  Cancer’s growth is stopped by chemicals in ganja, so yes, using cannabis is clearly a healthy choice.  Did I miss any health benefits?  Possibly hundreds?  Anti-inflammatory, anti-emetic, analgesic, anti-diabetic, antibacterial, antispasmodic, anti-psychotic, neuroprotective, the list goes on…

    Also, one need not smoke it to get the benefits.  Smokeless
    vaporizing methods are the most popular now, but eating it works too, with no risks to respiratory health.

    The “public health disaster” of tobacco is due to tobacco being highly addictive and deadly, not because it’s legal.  Legalizing cannabis would cause no such disaster, since cannabis is not nearly so addictive (if it is at all), and has no lethal dosage, nor associated fatal illnesses, but rather has substantial health benefits.  “Dr.” Thurstun’s statement is like saying that we can’t allow band-aids because knives are already allowed, and since so many people get cut by knives, we just can’t risk allowing people to have band-aids.

  • http://www.facebook.com/thefreeradical David Fleischmann

     Your solution makes no sense and solves nothing.  The only reason these substances make so much money is that they are banned.  If you keep the trade illegal, there will still be a huge profit motive to attract dealers and smugglers.  When substances are legal across the board, the market settles at a reasonable price, and the profit motive is taken out.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/I3Z2Y4UTJRONMMNOPN353SU2XU Scholar4Life

    Brain scan of marijuana user: http://www.amenclinics.com/the-science/spect-gallery/category/images-of-treatment 
    Study of effects of maternal marijuana use on children who were exposed during their fetal development:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3188826/
     
    What I find morbidly amusing is that the teenagers who use marijuana are under the impression that because it is local and organic it is healthy.  It shows their lack of thinking skills due to their age, but amusingly to marijuana use.  Have they considered that there are plants, etc. out in the world that are poisonous even though they are organic and local?  Children, if someone serves up a plate of locally and organically grown jimson weed and Amanita mushrooms, DON’T EAT THEM. Don’t smoke them either.
     
    What we usually consider to be medicine is not food.  Medicines are often poisons taken in very small amounts.

    What I find sad is these youth have the mindset of  western medicine – treat the symptom with a pill/joint.  The problems they are trying to abate with marijuana are better addressed with proper nutrition and removal of toxic substances from their environments.  Unfortunately natropathic healthcare is not covered by insurance.

    • Heard it all before!

      Debunked by Kevin Hunt above!

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/I3Z2Y4UTJRONMMNOPN353SU2XU Scholar4Life

    Brain scan of marijuana user: http://www.amenclinics.com/the-science/spect-gallery/category/images-of-treatment

    Study of effects of maternal marijuana use on children who were exposed during their fetal development: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3188826/

    What I find sad is that the teenagers who use marijuana are under the impression that because it is local and organic it is healthy. It shows their lack of thinking skills due to their age, or, perhaps, their use of marijuana.  Have they considered that there are plants, etc. out in the world that are poisonous even though they are organic and local? Children, if someone serves up a plate of locally and organically grown jimson weed and Amanita mushrooms, DON’T EAT THEM. Don’t smoke them either.
    What we usually consider to be medicine is not food. Medicines are often poisons taken in very small amounts.  Medicines usually have side effects that are injurious to the body.  That’s another idea that teenagers don’t seem to grasp.

    • Fulton Barrons

      In your idea of medicine, yes it is poison. Because almost all drugs from the big pharma are lab made toxins that are body does not enjoy.  These lab made drugs are bad for your liver, stomach, should I go on the list is large, up to death. Marijuana, which I prefer to call Cannabis, has not killed, does not kill healthy cells. Our bodies have an Endocannabinoid system that works synergistic-ally with the plant molecules,plural so you don’t think THC is the only fit, and work better than your man made drugs. I think the teenagers that think it works as medicine for them, it does. Without taking medicine for their ADHD, or other ailments. I notice a lot of cites on this page, and quite a few are old and disproved already. Plus all research is not written in stone, depends who is paying for the results, this is totally true and all readers here know it.

      • ChristineTatum

        Great! We all look forward to seeing you cite your sources for these claims.

        • Stuka

           Like your hysterical propaganda mill (Project ShAM) cites sources for their outrageous claims?  Pot. Kettle.

          • ChristineTatum

            Perhaps you’d like to get cracking on providing us those citations?

          • Heard it all before

             I made no claim. It’s YOUR cites we are calling into question.

            Wow, U Mad, Sis? 

            Yeah U Mad…

        • http://www.facebook.com/people/Kevin-Hunt/100003205282238 Kevin Hunt

          Researchers have also examined older children for the effects of prenatal exposure to marijuana. A study of one-year-olds found no differences between marijuana-exposed and nonexposed babies on measures of health, temperament, personality, sleeping patterns, eating habits, psychomotor ability, physical development, or mental functioning.17 In two studies, one of three-year-olds,18 the other of four-year-olds,19 there was no effect of prenatal marijuana exposure on children’s overall IQ test scores. However, in the first study, when researches looked at Black and White children separately, they found, among Black children only, slightly lower scores on two subscales of the IQ test. On one subscale, it was children exposed to marijuana only during the first trimester who scored lower. On the other subscale, it was children exposed during the second trimester who scored lower.20 In neither case did the frequency or quantity of mothers’ marijuana use affect the outcomes. This makes it highly unlikely they were actually caused by marijuana. Nonetheless, this study is now cited as evidence that using marijuana during pregnancy impairs the intellectual capacity of children.21
          http://mothering.com/pregnancy-birth/use-of-marijuana-during-pregnancy

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Kevin-Hunt/100003205282238 Kevin Hunt

      The ‘brain scans’ by Dr. Amen have been refuted as bunk by newer studies using similar technology.
      “…However, the level of marijuana use — up to nine times a week during the 18 months — was not linked to a change in brain tissue health.A teen who consumes alcohol is likely to have reduced brain tissue health, but a teen who uses marijuana is not, according to a new study.The study was conducted by researchers at UC San Diego and is scheduled to be published in the April issue of the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.” http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/21/teens-marijuana-brain-tissue-alcohol_n_2331779.html?utm_hp_ref=marijuana

  • KAllen

    Thank you so much for a very interesting and educational program.  With so much emotion surrounding this topic, we hope you will continue to report on other states’ experiences and bona fide research on the issue.

  • maxwood

    I note a photo at the top of this page shows a “joint” being smoked– which prejudices the issue.  During the radio discussion vaporizers were not mentioned even once though 2007 research at the University of California, San Francisco confirmed that they can eliminate heat shock, carbon monoxide and other combustion toxins which cause health and cognition issues routinely blamed on cannabis.   Also tendentious is use of the word “pot” (rhymes with “a lot”, “hot”, and “caught”).

    One expert expressed concern that cannabis will be commercialized resulting in another debacle as with tobacco– overlooking the opportunity now emerging to promote  use of vaporized inhalant cannabis to REPLACE combusted inhalant tobacco (the cigarette is described by Robert N. Proctor in “Golden Holocaust” as the most destructive product in human history;  presently 900,000 American youngsters get hooked on nicotine each year resulting in the famous estimated figure of 400,000 medically attested premature deaths).

    Actually complete cannabis legalization and decontrol would result in a REDUCTION in use because children would no longer favor the EASIER-TO-HIDE 500-mg  joint  (“Use it up fast so they don’t catch us!”) over safer delivery devices such as a 25-mg-serving-size one-hitter.

  • Raoul Ornelas

    katskits:
    I love your fire by you extrapolate of what I stated. First, my experience with my ex involves a plethora of
    of people involved with marijuana including there step up to other drugs. I never stated that
    the recent shooters were under the influence when mass shootings took place in America. What my statements
    meant to imply is the mental illness that may have influenced these mass killings may have
    been induced by early marijuana use which may have interfered with brain axiom-synapse
    growth which may have lead to schizophrenia. The World Health Organization about 15 years
    ago has labeled marijuana addictive….. that the marijuana today is more potent than
    the marijuana in the sixties. Clearly the young have been for some reason have been 
    performing mass killings across America. When I state young people, my range is between 15 to 
    the mid or late twenties. It takes this long for the brains to develop fully. If this is not enough
    informations then read this: 

    Adolescent brains undergo synaptic pruning, in which useful neural connections are nourished while lesser connections wither away. Nipping unnecessary synapses in the bud actually leads to deactivation in many regions as the growing brain sheds excess neural activity like baby fat. At the same time, the brain begins to activate regions such as the prefrontal cortex that handle abstract cognitive abilities. Of these abilities, impulse control is key in attaining adult-level mental maturity.
    One of the most interesting things from all these comments is this: People addicted to any kind of drugs or alcohol at any age will defend their addiction until (this includes drugs too) until the last dog dies. Maybe the problem with the gun culture is that these people have become paranoiac from smoking too much junk this may the reason all these people have so much fear and for sure it is not about the 2nd Amendment – like marijuana  the gun culture in America is about money……..BIG MONEY!

    • Fulton Barrons

      I like your perception that gun users are weed smokers, but so far from the truth. most gun users probably use prescription meds like oxy, zanac, or any other antidepressants,. 

    • Heard It All Before

      Wow, you have a simply amazing capacity for making shit up as you go along.  You know what we call that in the Real World?  Pathological lying.

  • CoDoc442

    Marijuana is not medicine. It has not met the rigors of clinical trials like all real medicines we prescribe do. It has caused deaths directly and indirectly. Do your research people. No “medicine” is delivered by combustion. Science is there but the horse has a long road to catch the cart in Colorado it’s so far in front of it. Pandora’s box is now open. Good luck Colorado with this. Great example for our kids.

    • Hojay23

       It hasn’t been put through the rigors of clinical trails because we are not allowed to in this country but has defiantly been researched elsewhere and in fact proven to be pretty good.  THC can be absorbed in other ways besides combustion.  Holding on to the stereotype that anything smoked is obviously bad is not helping anyone.  You would know this if you “did your research”.  I don’t know what you mean that Pandora’s box is open now.  You mean that only know have teenagers started smoking weed.  I think you should do some research.  Is weed good for teenagers, no.  Can weed be a good medicine, yes.  Did making the drug illegal ever stop anybody(especially teenagers) or did locking people up with ridiculous prison sentences ever help reform someones life, no.  I would love to find a doctor that would tell me without lying that they believe that a highly addictive and expensive painkiller like Oxycontin or anxiety medicine like Xanax would be better for anyone with those symptoms.

    • Fulton Barrons

      As I said before, aspirin didn’t go through FDA drug approval, it was grandfathered in because of its prevalent use. And yet aspirin causes stomach problems, can kill you with an overdose, of which you can purchase as many bottles as you want.Please give me some info on the persons who died directly from cannabis use. I’d like to see this piece of paper.As for science, maybe look up cannabinoids and neuroprotectents, cancer killers, also cannabis has other cannabinoids, like CBD.  Yes look up CBD, cannabidiol and it’s affect on cancer. Please use science the right way.Use studies that aren’t done by our government or any other unit working for the government, they are biased.

      • ChristineTatum

        Of course. There’s a vast government conspiracy at work here. And then there’s a vast conspiracy of Big Pharma. All of their research is so biased. But the research of people who will tell you what you want to hear is just fine. 

        • Heard it all before

          ” There’s a vast government conspiracy at work here.”

          In fact there is.  And YOU are part of it.  CristineTatum—>Christian Turdstone—> Kevin Sabet—>Gil Kerlikowske—>Goon Squads Busting Down Our Doors And Incinerating Our children

          • Heard it all before

             Title VII Office of National Drug Control PolicyReauthorization Act of 1998: H11225:

            Responsibilities.
            –The Director– [...] (12) shall ensure that no Federal funds appropriated to the Office of National Drug Control Policy shall be expended for any study or contract relating to thelegalization (for a medical use or any other use) of a substance listed in schedule I of section 202 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812) and take such actions as necessary to oppose any attempt to legalize the use of a substance (in any form) that– is listed in schedule I of section 202 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812); and  has not been approved for use for medical purposes by the Food and Drug Administration

            Yeahhhhhh….no conspiracy at work here…move along…nothing to see….

  • Hojay23

    Obviously anything mind altering isn’t good for teenagers.  But we have two problems.  1. Teenagers couldn’t care less 2.  Making it illegal never stopped a teenager.  I think marijuana can be addictive.  But not addictive like heroin is but addictive like food or video games are especially when self medicating; either way anything when addictive chemical or not is bad for anyone.  I don’t think it is really all that dangerous but it’s not good for developing brains.  Nobody want’s their children doing anything like drugs but realistically if you have a child they are going to at least try something by the end of college, at least.  I’m no expert but I’m pretty sure throwing someone in jail for marijuana is not going to help anybody, especially teenagers.  But I think what most teenagers mean is that weed is healthier than alcohol which is true.  You can say that teenagers shouldn’t do anything all you want, and everyone would agree with you, but that isn’t going to change anything.  Especially when you can’t regulate it and the kids can get it in their class room from other kids, which unlike a gas station will not ID you.

  • whatEVER

    I for one do not think that Robin and her team failed us.  Oh quite the contrary.  And for those of you who see nothing wrong with kids getting high and thinking it helps them, I think you have been smoking a little too much pot.  I do not wish to be faced with the unbelievable challenge of having to teach kids that are high all the time.  This is utter madness!!!  Sure, they think they do better on their tests, but did they actually do better?  Pot is a drug that changes our perception, it doesn’t magically make us better performers, it only makes you think everything is AWEOME!  When in reality it is not.  Honestly, sometimes I really wonder where we are headed.  When the cloud lifts, all they will be left with is sadness.  This is the time for kids to learn that they alone can take charge of their lives and change the way they perform and feel without a drug.  

    • enchentez

      Oh, look at the lovely Straw Man! JUST WHO here is proposing giving cannabis out to kids? 

  • whatEVER

    Two words I almost forgot.  Nick Drake.  

  • Margo

    As a parent, I just don’t understand what responsible adult would want this available for kids period.  Legalizing drugs isn’t a good thing and the ramifications of legalizing pot in Colorado will be so long lasting that we are in for the wildest rides of our lives.  It’s very disheartening to really believe that people think this is a good amendment for our beautiful, healthy state.

    • Fulton Barrons

      Teens get more drugs,harder drugs and more fake drugs now. Legalize and regulate to bring the access to it more of a challenge. I agree teens should not use but prohibition has given them the weed, not the other way around.This is why people are so confused. Drug dealers don’t check I.D. they don’t care if you can’t get what you want, here is something else, harder.Be smart help legalize to keep youth from easy access.

    • enchentez

      Oh, the Sky is Falling! What part of A64 DOESN’T ALLOW KIDS ACCESS TO CANNABIS do you refuse to understand? What part of YOU DON’T KNOW THAT do you fail to grasp? MMJ has been in Co for over a decade, and the Sky didn’t Fall like you hysterical prohibitionists predicted, either. 

  • motherbear

    Why are some people still comparing alcohol to marijuana as though this strategy increases bright futures for our youth? Smoking weed as a teen cant be good-right? This is established science. We should have waited to have implemented drug & alcohol awareness prevention science curriculum in schools for our youth (and apparently adults too) before legalizing it. Our children should have been put above weed agendas. 

  • myturn

    THANK YOU FOR THE INTERVIEW! I am a nurse and mother. I have personally seen youths lives fall apart because of marijuana. 
    Thank you for bringing knowledgeable people onto the program. I’ve  heard enough of the organized pro-marijuana talking point agendas. FINALLY- Thanks again! 

  • Papa-bear

    I’m a doctoral student, father and extremely disappointed
    long- time NPR listener and have been disgusted by the propaganda presented on
    this program. That being said here’s some links to the research:

    The drop in IQ is more likely result of socioeconomics: http://www.nature.com/news/pot-smokers-might-not-turn-into-dopes-after-all-1.12207

    The dangers of marijuana:

    According to which US Government authority you want to
    believe, the lethal dose of marijuana is either about one-third your body
    weight, or about 1,500 pounds, consumed all at once

    Thus, evidence from animal studies and human case reports
    appears to indicate that the ratio of lethal dose to effective dose is quite
    large. This ratio is much more favorable than that of many other common
    psychoactive agents including alcohol and barbiturates (Phillips et al. 1971,
    Brill et al. 1970).

    Alzheimer’s;

     Ramirez et al.
    2005. Prevention of Alzheimer’s disease pathology by cannabinoids.
    The
    Journal of Neuroscience 25: 1904-1913.

    Israel National News. December 16, 2010. “Israeli
    research shows cannabidiol may slow Alzheimer’s disease.”

    Eubanks et al. 2006. A molecular link between the active component of marijuana and
    Alzheimer’s disease pathology. Molecular Pharmaceutics 3: 773-777.

    Cancer:

    Cannabinoids:
    potential anticancer agents. Nature Reviews Cancer. 2003

    Inhibition
    of tumor angiogenesis by cannabinoids. The FASEB Journal. 2003

    the gateway theory rebuttal:

    Marijuana and
    Medicine: Assessing the Science Base”. National Academies Press. 1999. http://books.nap.edu/readingroom/books/marimed/notice.html.

    Children and schizophrenia;

     Most
    recently, a large-scale study by investigators at London’s Institute of
    Psychiatry reported that those patients diagnosed with schizophrenia who had
    previously used cannabis did not demonstrate exacerbated symptoms of the
    illness compared to age-adjusted controls who had not used cannabis. “This
    [finding] argues against a distinct schizophrenia-like psychosis caused by
    cannabis,” they concluded.

    Boydell et
    al. 2007. A comparison of symptoms and family history in schizophrenia with and
    without prior cannabis use: Implications for the concept of cannabis psychosis.
    Schizophrenia Research

    • ChristineTatum

      This is hardly a thorough review of the medical literature.  A much more detailed assessment, produced by Bertha Madras, professor of psychobiology at Harvard Medical School’s Department of Psychiatry can be found on Dr. Thurstone’s website: http://drthurstone.com/what-la… 

      • papabear

        I’m surprised that you’re not impressed with my medical
        literature review. The problem we have with marijuana research is that the
        federal government discourages research studies that reveal the benefits and
        true risk of marijuana.

         http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/19/health/policy/19marijuana.html?_r=0

        On the other hand the research produced by Bertha Madras was
        extremely weak consisting of cohort studies, case studies, and case series
        studies. According to the Oxford center for evidence-based medicine this is
        only a level IV or V which is pretty low level. I didn’t see a meta-analysis,
        systematic review or even a RCT which is surprising because the government does
        sponsor and encourage evidence to support the dangers of marijuana use.

         

        • whatEVER

          My goodness, we even having researchers researching the researching of researchers researching!  Now that is impressive.  Although I don’t think teenagers need to be impressed with our knowledge but maybe benefit from our true wisdom.  I fear we are failing them.

          • ChristineTatum

            We ARE failing them. You are right. 
            I am all for research. Bring it on. But let’s also be honest about the findings. And when those findings tell us what we don’t want to hear, let’s be adult enough to accept them. No amount of literature “Papa-bear” trots out is going to change these two facts: marijuana is addictive, and its use is especially harmful to children and adolescents (the basis for this interview). It’s also worth noting that Dr. Madras attaches her name to her scholarly reviews — unlike people who speak from the shadows of anonymity to dismiss her work.

          • Heard it all before

            @ChristineTatum:disqus  “And when those findings tell us what we don’t want to hear, let’s be adult enough to accept them.”

            You and your handlers need to take that to heart yourself.  YOU are the ones pandering long-debunked popaganda, innuendo, and outright lies.
            You say:  “Marijuana is addictive”

            You lie. No one goes through physical withdrawal like they do with heroin, alcohol, etc.  No DT’s no convulsions, nothing.

            “… and its use is especially harmful to children and adolescents (the basis for this interview)”

            The basis for this interview is Turdstone’s claim that legalizing cannabis will cause sellers to market to children.  That is pure sky-is-falling nonsense, Henny Penny. And no one is suggesting, advocating or legislating giving children or adolescents access to recreational cannabis. You are simply crying wolf and no one is buying your con game.

          • Heard it all before

             LOL how funny that you are trying to get people’s names.  This is the Interwebz, sister, where people can speak freely without your warpig bosses sending goon squads to incinerate our children. Deal with it!

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Kevin-Hunt/100003205282238 Kevin Hunt

        If you like reefer madness lies, you will love Dr. Thurstone!

        I learned so much from his website:

        1920s: “Makes darkies think they’re as good as white men.” —H.J. Anslinger, Bureau of Narcotics

        1930: “Marihuana is responsible for the raping of white women by crazed negroes.” —Hearst Newspapers Nationwide

        1935: “Marihuana influenced negroes to look at white people in the eye, step on white men’s shadows, and look at a white woman twice.” —Hearst Newspapers

        1937-50: “Negro entertainers with their jazz and swing music are declared an outgrowth of marihuana use which possesses white women to tap their feet.” —statements to Congress by Anslinger, FBN

  • SSDP

    The war on marijuana is a war on our kids!!!!

    Since 2000, students with drug convictions have lost access to
    federal financial aid as a result of a little known provision of the
    Higher Education Act (HEA). Added by Rep. Mark Souder (R-IN) as a
    committee amendment in 1998, the Aid Elimination Penalty slipped into
    the 257-page HEA reauthorization bill without debate or a recorded vote.

    Unfortunately, many members of Congress and financial aid
    administrators were unaware of this change in the law until long after
    its passage. To date, over 200,000 students have been ineligible for
    federal loans, grants, and work-study because of the HEA Aid Elimination
    Penalty.

    In early 2006,Students for Sensible Drug Policy and our allies forced Congress to scale back the
    law, so that only people who are convicted while in college and
    receiving financial aid will have their eligibility taken away. Now,
    people who got convicted before they decided to go to college will be
    able to move on with their lives and earn an education.

    During the Higher Education Act Reauthorization process of 2008,
    Congress further scaled back the penalty, making it easier for students
    with drug convictions to regain eligibility for financial aid. 
    Previously, students had to complete a government-approved treatment
    program, which are often more expensive than tuition at state
    universities or community colleges.  Now, students have to pass two
    unannounced drug tests administered by a government-approved treatment
    program, without completing the program itself.

    The most dangers thing about marijuana is if you get caught!

    PS: I do not condone the use of adolescence using any drug
    without their physician’s recommendation.    

    • ChristineTatum

      We don’t need to legalize the drug for recreational use to change polices and laws that are unnecessarily harmful to young people found using it. A new initiative chaired by Patrick Kennedy (Dr. Thurstone also serves on its board of directors), called Smart Approaches to Marijuana (SAM), explains this reasonably and well: http://learnaboutsam.com/legal-reform-3/

      • Stuka

         Not reasonably at all. There is nothing new about Project ShAM at all; it is more of the same drug-war nonsense painted over with a heaping dose of semantic prestidigitation and lies.

        You neglect to mention here that YOU are Thurstone’s mother or wife or chihuahua, and you are involved with that Project ShAM prohibitionist-propaganda front as well.  Go figure — disingenuousness runs rampant in your organization.

        No one is fooled at all by your claims of not wanting incarceration while using the threat of incarceration to force users into unnecessary “treatment ” for “addictions” they don’t have, which “treatment” is incarceration as well. And if one refuses your overtures or does not jump through all of your indoctrination hoops?  To the pokey — incarceration. 

        No one is fooled by your red herring of concern for teens, when every pro-cannabis law passed or proposed has safeguards against access for children.

        No one is impressed with your trolling and attempts to bully and shout down the thoughtful comments of actual listeners and readers who have reasonable disagreements with your husband’s propaganda. Your desperation is clearly showing.  It’s embarrassing to watch.

        • ChristineTatum

          I invite people to visit Project SAM’s website (learnmoreaboutsam_dot_com) because they’ll certainly see a thoughtful, reasoned discussion of this vitally important subject. The organization’s approach to this debate is misrepresented here (surprise, surprise), so people should take a look at it for themselves. 
          As I previously have noted, I make no secret of my identity.

          • Heard it all before

            What they will see is the same old Anslingerian-Nixonian disinformation and lies they have been hearing from the drug warpigs for the last 40 years, regurgitated and badly painted over with lipstick.

          • http://www.facebook.com/people/Kevin-Hunt/100003205282238 Kevin Hunt

            The proper address is  http://smartapproaches.com/

      • Heard it all before!

         You gave the wrong URL, sista:

        http://smartapproaches.com/

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Kevin-Hunt/100003205282238 Kevin Hunt

        Dr. Thurstone is a quack.

        Kennedy is a pillhead, coke-snorting drunk.

        Nice company you keep, Hatum.

  • papabear

    If you are a parent you must watch!!! We need a
    sensible policy to protect our children from the absurd policy’s we currently have
    and guard our children from real drugs!!!!

    Heroic Tennessee Congressman Steve Cohen Says Marijuana Not Gateway Drug
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aT1OLYJTbkU

    • ChristineTatum

      Yeah, um, when people are searching for qualified professionals to treat their child for marijuana addiction, they won’t be calling this Tennessee congressman with no formal training in medicine, public health or drug prevention. 

      • Stuka

        People searching for someone to treat “marijuana addiction” should instead turn their efforts to deprogramming themselves from the brainwashing they have received from prohibitionists’ propaganda like the “gateway drug” Big Lie.

        • MikeParent

           http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/article.aspx?articleid=97496
          IOW’s Gateway is debunked. 
          “The results of this study suggest that general behavioral deviancy and
          not specific risk factors accounts for illicit drug use. When illicit
          drug use occurs first, it is very likely due to the opportunity afforded
          by the neighborhood environment in context of low parental supervision.
          The probability and rate of development of a diagnosis of marijuana use
          disorder and alcohol use disorder were the same whether or not there
          was conformance with the gateway sequence. Evidence supporting “causal
          linkages between stages,” as specified by the gateway hypothesis (3, p.
          64), was not obtained. “

      • MikeParent

        Lie #2 Marijuana is very addictive and dangerous.
        FACT Marijuana is less addictive and less harmful than Caffeine, let alone alcohol and Tobacco;.
        Dr Henningfield is a former NIDA Staffer;.
        Addictiveness of Marijuana – ProCon.org.
        http://www.procon.org/view.background-resource.php?resourceID=1492
         

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Kevin-Hunt/100003205282238 Kevin Hunt

        Should we call on the head of the DEA who can’t even justify why MJ is in schedule one?

  • CBT

    I am thankful that physicians like Dr. Thurstone are putting the safety and wellbeing of our children first in this debate.  Thank you for this interview.  

    • Stuka

      EVERYONE in this debate is concerned about children’s safety and well-being.  Go stuff your strawman!

    • MikeParent

      What sort of message are you sending when the kids see Authority figures blatantly lying to them?  The “message to the kids” rhetoric is Red Herring. After alcohol prohibition was repealed, it became harder to get a drink because the industry was now being operated by legitimate business people who abided with the laws and regs.
      “THE CHILDREN” If they really cared for the children they’d legalize and regulate marijuana. If they really wanted to keep any substance out of the hands of “The Children” they first must take control of distribution away from black market dealers. They haven’t accomplished that in 40+ years at a taxpayers cost in the hundreds of billions. It’s time to treat marijuana as we do alcohol. My 28 year old daughter still gets “carded ” when she buys alcohol, yet your 13 year old can buy anything the black market dealer has for a price whether it be money or “something else”. FACT: Your kids have a better chance dying at the hands of someone enforcing marijuana laws than they do from ingesting it. (ZERO %).

       http://www.pitt.edu/~ugr/Hrych2.pdf Scientific Proof Marijuana is not a Gateway drug!
      http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-504763_162-57456999-10391704/medical-marijuana-legalization- wont-boost-teen-pot-use-study-finds/

      LEAP member, NYPD, ret.
       

  • DTP yeah U C ME

    I think that the children thinking that cannabis is healthy is directly related to the medical marijuana spin that we took in order to get safe access for those who want it.  The medical marijuana spin was necessary, however, because the community had a serious point to prove. 

    Nixon got this plant classified as a Schedule 1 drug, which means it has “no medical value”, and is bad for you.  In the years that followed, our industrious government refused to fund any research that did not support their point that cannabis is a complete blight on society.  Look at the University of Virginia study that showed anti-cancer traits in cannibinoids.  When this came to light, they shut the program down fast and buried the data.  (http://www.alternet.org/story/9257/pot_shrinks_tumors%3B_government_knew_in_'74)

    It was not until California funded the Center for Medical Cannabis Research at UCSD that there was any exhaustive research to see if there really was no medical value.  Needless to say, they did find medical value (http://www.cmcr.ucsd.edu/).  

    The point has been proven.  now it is up to the Federal Government to reschedule cannabis so that we can have regulations and really protect our children.  Neither the black market, or the medical marijuana loop hole are effective at keeping this plant from children.  Safe, government endorsed regulations will.  

    You ignored the fact that the Colorado regulations will be enforced by the same people who oversee the liquor licenses in Colorado.  I didn’t hear anything about how difficult it is for kids to get alcohol today.  There was no comment on the burden placed on the alcohol salesperson -be it a bartender, a server, a liquor store employee- to ensure that they are not selling to minors.  

    Kids have always been able to get cannabis easier than alcohol or cigarettes because the drug dealer doesn’t care how old you are.  Now that the legal medical market is strong, and has hit the mainstream, we need to protect our kids.  This article makes it sound like you want to go back to the 80′s where we did a great job putting poor black and brown people in prison for this herb that grown up Americans clearly desire.  

    I have some questions that you did not talk about in the article.  What is the rate of teen alcohol use right now? Is it the same? What about cigarettes?  Finally, have teen drunk driving accidents increased or decreased recently?  I hear nothing about these statistics in here.   

    • papabear

       Great JOB!!!! It’s time we end the propaganda and use
      real science to help inform and make good policies.
      The physician on this
      program is an embarrassment to the medical profession and science as a whole. He
      makes absolutist claims on the lowest levels of evidence in science and basis
      his professional recommendations on it. For the laymen the level of evidence
      he’s basing his absolutist claims would be comparable to someone in Nebraska
      going outside their farmhouse and doing a case study by scanning the horizon and
      the fields and concluding that the world is flat.

      The only thing he got right was when he said “we are
      hurting our children” and I couldn’t agree with him more. We are destroying
      our children’s lives by continuing to lie and incarcerate our children on the
      basis of someone’s morals and weak evidence.

      • ChristineTatum

        And your evidence for this is?

        • DTPyeahUCME

          Here is some data for you, Christine about youth incarceration rates plummeting due to a legal cannabis market. “All categories of crime fell substantially among youths in 2011.  
          Report from the Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice:
          “Felony arrests were down 17%, both violent and property felonies were down 16%, misdemeanor and status offenses were down 21%, and homicide was down 26% (see table 1).  These data demonstrate today’s young people are less likely to be involved with the criminal justice system than any generation in at least the  last 60 years.” 

          http://www.cjcj.org/files/CA_Youth_Crime_2011.pdf

        • Stuka

          Look up”shill” in the dictionary and you will find a picture of Chistine Tatum, the WIFE if this same Doctor Turdstone.

  • papabear

    Thurstone,

    Here is the
    evidence regarding your data being incomplete and misleading:

    First the data you
    sight is biased by the Federal government

    Lyle
    E. Craker, a professor of plant sciences at the University of
    Massachusetts, has been trying to get permission from federal authorities
    for nearly nine years to grow a supply of the plant that he could study and
    provide to researchers for clinical trials.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/19/health/policy/19marijuana.html?_r=0

    Researchers hoping to
    study the medical benefits of marijuana are taking the Drug Enforcement
    Administration (DEA) to federal court for blocking access to the plant. The
    Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) has received free
    legal representation in a lawsuit against the DEA over a license to grow
    marijuana for federally regulated research.The D.C.-based law firm Covington
    & Burling LLP, one of the foremost law firms representing the
    pharmaceutical industry, has offered pro-bono legal representation to the
    research group to appeal the DEA’s August 15 final order in the First Circuit
    Court of Appeals. MAPS estimated the law firm saved them $175,000 in legal
    costs.

    http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/09/21/marijuana-researchers-get-pro-bono-representation-in-dea-lawsuit/

    The Drug
    Enforcement Administration (DEA) is being sued by the Multidisciplinary
    Association for Psychedelic Studies for upholding a monopoly on research
    marijuana and for blocking medical marijuana studies.

    http://santacruz.patch.com/articles/dea-going-to-federal-court-for-blocking-medical-marijuana-research

    Second We ARE
    MISSING ALL THE DATA because of research FRAUD which is a HUGE problem in
    Evidence based medicine!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    When a new
    drug gets tested, the results of the trials should be published for the rest of
    the medical world — except much of the time, negative or inconclusive findings
    go unreported, leaving doctors and researchers in the dark

    http://www.ted.com/talks/ben_goldacre_what_doctors_don_t_know_about_the_drugs_they_prescribe.html

    Unpublished
    results hide the decline effect: Many scientifically discovered effects
    published in the literature seem to diminish with time. Dubbed the decline
    effect, this puzzling anomaly was first discovered in the 1930s in research
    into parapsychology, in which the statistical significance of purported
    evidence for psychic ability declined as studies were repeated.

    http://www.nature.com/news/2011/110223/full/470437a.html

    Lastly you
    have weak content validly

    I could write
    a cohort longitude study with a p =0.001 correlating adolescent marijuana use
    and becoming the president of the United States of America with N=3.

    I am not sure
    if you have spent too much time in your ivory tower or if you grew up in a
    bubble, but most of the adolescents I grew up with used marijuana and when they
    grew up they became doctors, lead researchers in bio-medicine, physics,
    aerospace engineers, teachers, lawyers, Olympic swimmers and yes a couple
    became President of the United States. This being said I don’t not thing we
    should encourage the use of any drugs for adolescents, but getting on the radio
    and preaching about the grave dangers of adolescence marijuana use destroying
    the public health is irresponsible and misleading. We have a real health
    problem with adolescence drug abuse starting with prescription drugs!!!

    The rate of
    fatal poisonings among 15- to 19-year-olds surged 91 percent between 2000 and
    2009, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention revealed Monday, a result
    of the nation’s epidemic of prescription drug abuse    

    http://thehill.com/blogs/healthwatch/public-global-health/221693-teenage-prescription-drug-deaths-skyrocketing-cdc-warns

    So, if you
    real interest is adolescent drug abuse get on the radio and talk about this,
    and don’t waist our time and limited resources!!!!!  

    In conclusion,
    marijuana is addictive just like masturbation, porn, overeating, under eating,
    video games, but nothing like alcohol, tobacco, heroin, cocaine, and bad
    science!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uUPHlAbAf2I

     

    • Heard It All Before

      @ “Second We ARE MISSING ALL THE DATA because of research FRAUD which is a HUGE problem in Evidence based medicine!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!”

      Oh, SAY IT ISN’T SO!

      Title VII Office of National Drug Control Policy Reauthorization Act of 1998: H11225: Responsibilities. –The Director– [...] (12) shall ensure that no Federal funds appropriated to the Office of National Drug Control Policy shall be expended for any study or contract relating to the legalization (for a medical use or any other use) of a substance listed in schedule I of section 202 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812) and take such actions as necessary to oppose any attempt to legalize the use of a substance (in any form) that–is listed in schedule I of section 202 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812); and has not been approved for use for medical purposes by the Food and Drug Administration

      No, there is no research fraud….move along now…nothing to see here…

  • Larmac4246

    So, all the MJ zealots believe there is no harm in the effects from using cannabis? I guess as the mom of my  deceased oldest son who only started using cannabis after high school (since he dated a young woman who we later found out was the ‘queen pin of cannabis’) you might here me out.  My son at age 22 became a much more frequent user  of MJ after a life-altering knee injury and surgery which caused him to be laid up for over a year. Sadly, my son’s use of cannabis increased dramatically as he was disabled, realizing he shouldn’t go ahead with his marriage to this young woman but out of love and obligation decided to put her ahead of his insecurity he was not ready to marry with this knee injury and financial insecurity. Two months after getting married, using a lot of cannabis which helped with his terrible knee pain, my son at age 23 suffered a psychotic break. If you have never been around someone in psychosis, it is the most terrifying experience and for a mother and father, friends and family of my beautiful 6’5″ son with NO history of mental illness (no schizophrenia, no bipolar) it was terrifying. Cannabis was the “only” drug on his toxicology report but after 10 days in a locked ward upon discharge my son confided in me he had done one-time magic mushrooms prior to his breakdown, but the half-life of mushrooms was too short to be show up on his tox screen so the psych hospital was unaware. Despite my questions to the psychiatrists, and the psych staff we were told “it’s just cannabis” and the studies I quoted from 1998 to present in 2009 about the link between cannabis causing psychosis, if used frequently, to  certain young, developing minds (to age 25) was refuted. My questions about the connection to today’s cannabis and psychosis was dismissed, studies were dismissed by “the experts”. However,  with my educ in the science world I kept researching until I am >100% that this link, in certain brains, is causal. Studies across the globe keep mounting: from the UK to Australia and in No America, multiple studies exist- just do your own search online and review the studies one by one. I have no respect for the field of psychiatry after all the blatant lies and mistruths because if we had not listened to the experts who told us our son was “just a recreational user” and didn’t need in-pt rehab we might have been able to save our son. It took 10 wks for his psychosis to abate, what a horrid time  for him and all of us trying to understand where his mind had gone. The potent, toxic meds ( mood stabilizers, antipsychotics) in my prof opinion did nothing to help his state of psychosis. Our son told us his mind felt “cloudy”, his weight shot up 55 lbs in 4 months with stress marks to show the rapid wt gain on this incredibly handsome, fit physique. Being told “mental illness  for life; meds for life” surely did nothing to help my son who until this breakdown was such a healthy, charismatic, full of life young man loved by all. He did not have mood swings until he started using illicit drugs, mostly cannabis. Once he returned to his young marriage of two months, his wife silently and unbeknownst to us,  moved on emotionally just using my son and his family to get all her material needs until she was ready to leave and had found a new man to take care of her. I believe my son had a physical addiction to MJ because he returned to  using after ten months of abstaining from cannabis.  He did stop using the psychiatric drugs as he continued to have suicidal thoughts and clouded thinking (his words) while on these Rxs with many horrid side effects. Please open your minds and read the masterpiece by Robert Whitaker (2010) Anatomy of an Epidemic. Whitaker is a  journalist, NOT in the mental health industry but an award winning science writer who educates his readers about “magic bullets, psychiatric drugs and the astonishing rise of mental illness in America. If I had read pg 180 of Whitaker’s book while my son was still alive, I believe I could my son would be alive today. Had any one of  “the experts” in the deeply flawed (and I believe corrupt) world of mental health had told me what I learned by reading Whitaker’s facts bipolar disorder is now a manufactured disorder from use of illicit drugs (including cannabis) as well as stimulants,and  antidepressants to certain brains. What used to be a rare and episodic condition that affected 1 in 13,000 adults is now a chronic, debilitating lifelong illness that affects 1 in 40 adults in this country!!!!!! Not to mention the 4000% increase in “juvenile” bipolar disorder over the last decade in America:-(  Big Pharma and a tainted mental health industry with its collusion is surely part of the explanation. Had our son been told he needed in-pt rehab as he was physically and mentally addicted to cannabis, might he be alive today? And what about the studies linking frequent use of MJ to suicide??? Read the 30 yr cohort study of children born in Christchurch, NZ authored by Professor Jenny Williams from the Univ of Melbourne which links the more frequent use of cannabis is a risk factor for suicidal ideation and that it is NOT suicidal ideation that causes cannabis use (Aug, 2012). My son at age 25 had more hits in the last two years of his young life but stopped cannabis, got healthy thru AA but less than six months from abstaining from cannabis took his life which has caused horrific pain for those of us that he left. Was it from neurotransmitter levels falling to such low levels as the highest suicide risk ( I learned after my son’s death) is within six months of abstinence? Was he really bipolar because so many new cases are manufactured because of his choice in using cannabis which has a high risk of suicide? I will never know but if this message can alert just one  person to realize using cannabis, with the powerful amounts of THC genetically altered in this plant, is a game of Russian Roulette than my son’s  life is not in vain.  My son and his friends never knew the risks, I know that. And with NO history of mental illness in either families dating back to the Mayflower, I don’t believe more studies are needed to prove this relationship exist. Cannabis use took my son’s mind from him and his life from a family that still remains in shock and disbelief- not this normal, healthy, vibrant life for 23 of his shortened 25 years that we nourished, cherished and adored. The only thing  in my son’s  past  was the plant,  cannabis, that can explain what led to his   two mental breaks and ultimately,  his untimely death.

    • Stuka

      @Lamarc: “Had any one of  “the experts” in the deeply flawed (and I believe
      corrupt) world of mental health had told me what I learned by reading
      Whitaker’s facts bipolar disorder is now a manufactured disorder from
      use of illicit drugs (including cannabis) as well as stimulants,and
       antidepressants to certain brains.”

      Whittaker’s assertion is without any basis at all in fact. Sorry, you
      have drunk the Kool-Aid of a writer whose research is deeply flawed. There are many with bipolar disorder — which is a real disease, no matter how much you want to believe otherwise — who have never used any illicit drugs, or licit ones like alcohol or tobacco. Calling bipolar disorder a “manufactured” disorder does a great deal of harm to those who have it, who are already highly stigmatized.

      @Lamarc: “The only thing  in my son’s  past  was the plant,  cannabis, that can
      explain what led to his  two mental breaks and ultimately,  his
      untimely death.”

      You said yourself that he had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Yes, that kills. Yes, that explains his psychotic breaks.  Sorry, AA doesn’t “treat” bipolar disorder (it doesn’t treat anything). Many folks with bipolar try to self-medicate with alcohol and other drugs. It doesn’t work. Nor does going untreated. Bipolar disorder does not arise dependent on a family history, or a personal history of mental illness. Your anger at cannabis and its proponents is misplaced.

  • Stuka

     The “Teen use” argument is an enormous stinking red herring. What part
    of NO LAW, PROPOSED OR PASSED, GRANTS CANNABIS ACCESS TO CHILDREN do
    these clowns fail to understand?

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/09/07/marijuana-usage-down-in-t_n_1865095.html

    “To put it simply, teen marijuana usage has been going down in
    Colorado since the passage of our comprehensive medical marijuana
    regulatory model,” Mike Elliott, executive director of the Medical
    Marijuana Industry Group, told The Huffington Post. “This is exactly the
    opposite of what opponents of medical marijuana predicted. Colorado’s
    teen marijuana usage rate is going down because this regulatory model
    has taken control away from the black market and given it back to our
    school districts, local and state governments, and the citizens of
    Colorado.”

    The CDC report shows:

    Youth marijuana use in Colorado went down 2.8 percent from 2009 (24.8 percent) to 2011 (22 percent).
    Youth marijuana use nationally went up 2.3 percent from 2009 (20.8 percent) to 2011 (23.1 percent).
    In 2011, youth marijuana usage in Colorado fell below the national average — 22 percent in Colorado, 23.1 percent in the U.S.

    But the CDC report didn’t just measure youth usage, it also measured
    drug availability on Colorado school grounds. The report shows:

    Availability of drugs on school grounds in Colorado went down 5 percent from 2009 (22.7 percent) to 2011 (17.2 percent).
    Nationally, illegal drugs offered, sold or given on school property was
    up 3.1 percent from 2009 (22.7 percent) to 2011 (25.6 percent).
    Availability of illegal drugs on school grounds in Colorado is below the
    national average by 8.4 percent — 17.2 percent in Colorado, 25.6
    percent in the U.S.

    http://www.ucdenver.edu/about/newsroom/newsreleases/Pages/medical-marijuana-teenagers.aspx

    Study shows no evidence medical marijuana increases teen drug use

    6/18/2012

    ​By David Kelly | University CommunicationsDENVER –
    While marijuana use by teens has been increasing since 2005, an
    analysis of data from 1993 through 2009 by economists at three
    universities has found no evidence to link the legalization of medical
    marijuana to increased use of the drug among high school students.

    “There is anecdotal evidence that medical marijuana is finding its
    way into the hands of teenagers, but there’s no statistical evidence
    that legalization increases the probability of use,” said Daniel I.
    Rees, a professor of economics at the University of Colorado Denver.

    Rees co-authored the study with Benjamin Hansen, assistant professor of economics at the University of Oregon and D. Mark Anderson, assistant professor of economics at Montana State University.
     

    They examined the relationship between the legalization of medical
    marijuana and marijuana consumption using nationally representative data
    on high school students from the Youth Risky Behavior Survey (YRBS) for
    the years 1993 through 2009, a period when 13 states, including Alaska,
    California, Colorado, Hawaii, Maine, Nevada, Oregon and Washington,
    legalized medical marijuana.  Seventeen states and the District of
    Columbia now have such laws with legislation pending in seven others.

    “This result is important given that the federal government has
    recently intensified its efforts to close medical marijuana
    dispensaries,” said Hansen, who studies risky behaviors of adolescents
    and adults. “In fact, the data often showed a negative relationship
    between legalization and marijuana use.”

  • Stuka

     
    What a travesty of irresponsible “reporting” — actually, propaganda-mongering.

    Here are some REAL facts:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/09/07/marijuana-usage-down-in-t_n_1865095.html

    “To put it simply, teen marijuana usage has been going down in
    Colorado since the passage of our comprehensive medical marijuana
    regulatory model,” Mike Elliott, executive director of the Medical
    Marijuana Industry Group, told The Huffington Post. “This is exactly the
    opposite of what opponents of medical marijuana predicted. Colorado’s
    teen marijuana usage rate is going down because this regulatory model
    has taken control away from the black market and given it back to our
    school districts, local and state governments, and the citizens of
    Colorado.”

    The CDC report shows:

    Youth marijuana use in Colorado went down 2.8 percent from 2009 (24.8 percent) to 2011 (22 percent).
    Youth marijuana use nationally went up 2.3 percent from 2009 (20.8 percent) to 2011 (23.1 percent).
    In 2011, youth marijuana usage in Colorado fell below the national average — 22 percent in Colorado, 23.1 percent in the U.S.

    But the CDC report didn’t just measure youth usage, it also measured
    drug availability on Colorado school grounds. The report shows:

    Availability of drugs on school grounds in Colorado went down 5 percent from 2009 (22.7 percent) to 2011 (17.2 percent).
    Nationally, illegal drugs offered, sold or given on school property was
    up 3.1 percent from 2009 (22.7 percent) to 2011 (25.6 percent).
    Availability of illegal drugs on school grounds in Colorado is below the
    national average by 8.4 percent — 17.2 percent in Colorado, 25.6
    percent in the U.S.

    Study shows no evidence medical marijuana increases teen drug use

    http://www.ucdenver.edu/about/newsroom/newsreleases/Pages/medical-marijuana-teenagers.aspx

    DENVER – While marijuana use by teens has been increasing since 2005,
    an analysis of data from 1993 through 2009 by economists at three
    universities has found no evidence to link the legalization of medical
    marijuana to increased use of the drug among high school students.

    “There is anecdotal evidence that medical marijuana is finding its
    way into the hands of teenagers, but there’s no statistical evidence
    that legalization increases the probability of use,” said Daniel I.
    Rees, a professor of economics at the University of Colorado Denver.

    Rees co-authored the study with Benjamin Hansen, assistant professor of economics at the University of Oregon and D. Mark Anderson, assistant professor of economics at Montana State University.
     

    They examined the relationship between the legalization of medical
    marijuana and marijuana consumption using nationally representative data
    on high school students from the Youth Risky Behavior Survey (YRBS) for
    the years 1993 through 2009, a period when 13 states, including Alaska,
    California, Colorado, Hawaii, Maine, Nevada, Oregon and Washington,
    legalized medical marijuana.  Seventeen states and the District of
    Columbia now have such laws with legislation pending in seven others.

    “This result is important given that the federal government has
    recently intensified its efforts to close medical marijuana
    dispensaries,” said Hansen, who studies risky behaviors of adolescents
    and adults. “In fact, the data often showed a negative relationship
    between legalization and marijuana use.”

    Federal officials, including the Director of the Office of National
    Drug Control Policy, argue that the legalization of medical marijuana
    has contributed to the recent increase in marijuana use among teens in
    the United States and have targeted dispensaries operating within 1,000
    feet of schools, parks and playgrounds.

    According to the 2011 report “Monitoring the Future National Results
    on Adolescent Drug Use,” prepared annually by the University of Michigan
    Institute for Social Research, marijuana use by 10th and 12th graders
    has risen in the last three years, with roughly one in 15 high school
    seniors smoking marijuana daily or near-daily. The report, cited in the
    economists’ study, surveyed 46,700 students in the eighth, 10th and 12th
    grades, in 400 secondary schools.

    The new study “Medical Marijuana Laws and Teen Marijuana Use”
    currently is a non-peer-reviewed working paper made available by the
    Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), a private, non-profit
    independent research institute based in Bonn, Germany, that conducts
    internationally oriented labor market research. The paper is available
    online at http://www.iza.org/en/webcontent/publications/papers/viewAbstract?dp_id=6592.

    Researchers examined the relationship between legalization and a
    variety of outcomes including: marijuana use at school, whether the
    respondent was offered drugs on school property, alcohol use, and
    cocaine use.  Their results provided no evidence that legalization led
    to increases in the use of marijuana at school, the likelihood of being
    offered drugs on school property, or the use of other substances.

    In addition to using the national YRBS, the researchers drew on state
    YRBS data for the period 1993 through 2009 and data from the National
    Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97).  None of these sources
    provided evidence that teenage marijuana use increases with the
    legalization of medical marijuana.

    The YRBS and NLSY97 contain information on self-reported marijuana
    use.  The researchers also analyzed the Treatment Episode Data Set
    (TEDS), which contains information on whether patients at federally
    funded drug treatment facilities tested positive for marijuana upon
    admission.  The results suggested that legalization of medical marijuana
    was unrelated to the likelihood that patients ages 15-20 tested
    positive for marijuana.

    “We are confident that marijuana use by teenagers does not increase
    when a state legalizes medical marijuana,” said Montana State’s
    Anderson, who studies health economics, risky behavior and crime.

    http://www.denverpost.com/news/marijuana/ci_22432417?source=bb

    Study linking marijuana use to teen IQ drop under fire
    Posted: 01/23/2013 12:02:35 PM MST
    Updated: 01/23/2013 12:20:34 PM MST
    Reuters
    A landmark study suggesting a link between cannabis use and a drop in
    teenage IQ may not have gone far enough in its research, with any falls
    in IQ more likely due to lower socioeconomic status than marijuana,
    according to a Norwegian study. (PABLO PORCIUNCULA/AFP/Getty Images)
    SYDNEY (Reuters) – A landmark study suggesting a link between cannabis
    use and a drop in teenage IQ may not have gone far enough in its
    research, with any falls in IQ more likely due to lower socioeconomic
    status than marijuana, according to a Norwegian study.

    The latest work, which appears in the journal PNAS, Proceedings of
    the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, also
    suggests that different policy steps might be needed in that case.

    “My study essentially shows that the methods used and analyses
    presented in the original research are insufficient to rule out other
    explanations (for lower IQ),” said Ole Rogeberg, an economist at the
    Frisch Centre for Economics Research in Oslo, to Reuters.

    The Dunedin Multi-disciplinary Health and Development Study is an
    ongoing report produced by New Zealand’s University of Otago, monitoring
    1,037 New Zealand children born between April 1972 and March 1973. The
    study followed them for 40 years.

    The participants were periodically tested for IQ and other indices
    including drug taking, and in 2012 clinical psychologist Madeline Meier
    produced a study saying there was a link between teenage cannabis use
    and a lower IQ.

    Researchers in the Meier study compared the IQ trends of people who
    never smoked cannabis with four groups of those who did: people who
    smoked, people who scored as dependent in a follow-up survey, those who
    scored as dependent twice and those who scored as dependent three times.

    The study found IQ declines increasing “linearly” with cannabis use, Rogeberg wrote in PNAS.

    The crucial assumption in the Meier study is that cannabis use is the
    only relevant difference between the groups tested, he said. His use of
    a simulation model showed that it may be premature to draw a causal
    inference between marijuana use and falling IQ scores.

    For one thing, other writing about the Dunedin group on which Meier’s
    study is based suggest that early cannabis use is more common for
    people with poor self-control, previous conduct problems, and high
    scores on risk factors linked to low family socioeconomic status, he
    wrote.

    Given these factors, young people from lower status families tended
    to end up in less intellectually demanding environments, whether by
    choice or by circumstance, which would increase the difference in IQ
    levels as they aged.

    “We know that the researchers have measured the IQ of the
    participants at various ages in childhood – but we don’t know if the IQ
    changes were similar for the different cannabis-using groups before
    their cannabis use,” he told Reuters.

    “We don’t know how much of the change in IQ we can explain by
    differences in education, jail time, occupational status, etc and
    whether this affects the estimates in the paper.”

    But please, Dr. Thurstone, don’t let facts get in the way of your hysterical propaganda campaign.

  • Stuka

    “Dr. Christian Thurstone….a member of Gov.
    John Hickenlooper’s task force to come up with WAYS TO SABOTAGE THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PEOPLE’S WILL AS EXPRESSED IN AMENDMENT 64…”

    fixed that for ya.

  • Stuka

    You neglect to mention, as you troll the thoughtful posts of concerned listeners here, that you are the mother or wife or chihuahua of Dr. Thurstone and you are directly involved with his prohibitionist propaganda front Project ShAM.

    We look forward to your organization providing citations to support its gish-gallop of long-debunked big Lies as well.  Not going to hold our breath, though.

    • ChristineTatum

      Oh, no. It’s no secret that I’m married to Dr. Thurstone. I’m easily found online and make no effort to hide my identity – unlike you, um, “Heard It All Before.” I have researched this subject thoroughly and, as the wife of a physician who treats children and families struggling with drug addiction, witness much of the tragedy many people on these threads merely pontificate about. 

      • Heard It All Before

        You haven’t said one thing about being Thurstone’s yap dog on this page until you were called out on it.  And you present here the true face of your gang: hysterical, lying, angry, with nothing but strawmen and misrepresentations to argue with.

        • ChristineTatum

          I write under my name so people can research it and find me easily. And your excuse is?

          • Heard it all before

              LOL how funny that you are trying to get people’s names.  This is the
            Interwebz, sister, where people can speak freely without your warpig handlers sending goon squads to incinerate our children. Deal with it!

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Kevin-Hunt/100003205282238 Kevin Hunt

        Ha Ha.. Hatum=”Liar for Hire”!

  • Heard It All Before!

    Recent propaganda “news item” from the Chief DrugWarPig, Gil Kerlikmeanus, at a gathering of law enforcement officers at the University of San Francisco:

    **The nation’s top drug cop advocated a “different approach” to
    narcotics enforcement — and stressed that there is no “war on drugs”
    **Drug users need treatment and education rather than jail terms, according to Gil Kerlikowske
    ** Kerlikowske also said that calling cannabis medicine “sends a terrible message” to the nation’s teens.
    **High
    school students are more likely to smoke marijuana than tobacco due to
    the growing “perception” that marijuana is less harmful, he said.
    **“Medicinal marijuana has never been through the FDA process”
     

    WOW, look at all that propaganda, every bit of it straight out of the Tatum/Turdstone/Sabet/Kerlikmeanus/DeathSquadsAtYourDoor, Project SHaM playbook!

    Are you fooled?  Apparently very few are. No wonder Project ScAM has only been able to  dredge up 117 “likes” on their FB page. No one is fooled. One can only extort so much out of their families and soon-to-be-ex-friends. But the highly enthusiastic FB participation and support of high-end-Fleiss-whore Alexandra Datig (who now “crusades” against “human trafficking”, which she — as a more-than-willing participant in a shockingly high-paying call-girl service — knows nothing about) lends a small amount of credibility to their cause.

    • Heard It All Before!

       
      ALL of these things are parroted on the Project ShAM website by Turdstone, Frum, Kennedy, and OH — guess who: Kevin Sabet, whose CV reads thusly:
      http://kevinsabet.com/about
      “From 2009-2011, he served in the Obama Administration as the Senior Advisor to Director Kerlikowske at the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP). In this position, Dr. Sabet advised Director Kerlikowske on all matters affecting priorities, policies, and programs of the National Drug Control Strategy. He was one of three main writers of President Obama’s first National Drug Control Strategy, and his portfolio included leading the office’s efforts on marijuana policy, legalization issues, international demand reduction, drugged driving, and synthetic drug (e.g. “Spice” and “Bath Salts”) policy.”

      “Office of National Drug Control Policy
      Senior Policy Advisor to the Director
      Senior Advisor to the Director of ONDCP, Gil Kerlikowske. One of three principal writers of the President’s inaugural National Drug Control Strategy. Involved in all major policy decisions, liaised regularly with the Domestic Policy Council and Office of the Vice-President. Often represented the office to the media and in official meetings. Specific lead on marijuana, “medical” marijuana, legalization, synthetic drugs, drugged driving, and international and United Nations issues.”

      LOVE the quotes around “medical” just above.  

      Oh, and LOOK:
      http://reason.com/blog/2012/07/09/former-drug-czar-advisor-says-obamas-thi

      Former Drug Czar Advisor Says Obama’s “Third Way” Drug Policy Involves “Short Stints in Jail”
      Mike Riggs|Jul. 9, 2012 10:50 am
      A former senior analyst with the Office of National Drug Control Policy under President Obama says the “third way” drug policy frequently invoked by Drug Czar Gil Kerlikowske as an alternative to incarceration often involves “short stints in jail” when users fail to stay abstinent.
      In a letter to U.S. News and World Report, Kevin Sabet, a former senior policy advisor to Kerlikowske and one of the architects of Obama’s drug control strategy (now in its third year), writes
          Decades of research have shown that treatment reduces crime and saves money. But newer interventions, like drug courts or interventions that combine positive drug tests with very short sanctions (like 1-3 days in jail) can significantly reduce drug use and help people live a better life. Using the judicial system wisely by enforcing abstinence with short stints in jail is an incentive drug users sometimes need—indeed it has shown to work better than traditional, voluntary treatment alone.
      Emphasis mine. This is the first time that a member of Obama’s drug team–current or former–has admitted in public that the President’s “third way” policy involves incarcerating users who fail drug tests after being “diverted.”
      Sabet’s letter should have several implications for Obama’s new policy. For starters, it should garner some follow-up reporting from mainstream media outlets that ran sucker stories after Kerlikowske spoke at the Center for American Progress in May; and again in June, after Kerlikowske made similar statements at the Betty Ford Center:
          Drug czar wants to treat addiction rather than wage ‘war’
          Drug Czar Kerlikowske Promotes ‘Paradigm Shift’ on Abuse
          Drug czar says addiction is a health problem, not a moral failing
          Treat drug abuse as public health issue, US czar says
          Drug Czar Wants Renewed Focus On Recovery
          Drug policy laws, focus must change, ‘czar’ insists
          Drug Czar: Addicts Should Receive Treatment, Not Just Prosecution
      The Obama administration has scored one drug-war PR victory after another by falsely claiming that it’s spending more on treatment and prevention than on enforcement. Thanks to Sabet, we know those treatment dollars are actually paying for “short stints in jail.”
      But even that claim needs qualifying. According to a report released last year by the Drug Policy Alliance, if 120,000 people a year enter drug court (which is what the ONDCP claims), only 25,000 will complete the program. The rest are incarcerated. Furthermore, “even if drug courts were dramatically expanded to scale to cover all people arrested for drug possession, between 500,000 and 1 million people would still be ejected from a drug court and sentenced conventionally every year.”

      Yeah, these clowns are really “against incarceration.  Funny how they haven’t figured out that anyone with an internet connection can figure out right quick that these clowns are lying through their teeth. The days of Anslinger and Nixon’s Big Lies are over. The folks at Project ScAm are just too dumb to figure it out.

  • MikeParent

    Just some Prohibitionist Lies, refuted with Science;

    Lie #1 Gateway Drug.
    FACT Marijuana is NOT a Gateway Drug. Here’s a 12 Yr Univ Study that says so;.
    http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/article.aspx?articleid=97496
    Media overview; http://www.pitt.edu/~ugr/Hrych2.pdf

    Lie #2 Marijuana is very addictive and dangerous.
    FACT Marijuana is less addictive and less harmful than Caffeine, let alone alcohol and Tobacco;.
    Dr Henningfield is a former NIDA Staffer;.
    Addictiveness of Marijuana – ProCon.org.
    http://www.procon.org/view.background-resource.php?resourceID=1492

    Lie #’s 3 & 4, Marijuana has no Medicinal Use and is Dangerous.

    FACT In 1988, a DEA Administrative judge wrote, in a report.
    Commissioned by the DEA; “16. Marijuana, in its natural form, is one of.
    the safest therapeutically active substances known to man. By any
    measure of rational analysis marijuana can be safely used within a
    supervised routine of medical care.”
    http://www.ccguide.org/young88…”

    FACT For good measure, the CDC reported Med Marijuana doesn’t increase teen use.
    http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-504763_162-57456999-10391704/medical-marijua
    wont-boost-teen-pot-use-study-finds/”

    http://www.wakingtimes.com/2013/01/11/top-10-cannabis-studies-the-government-wished-it-had-never-funded/
    LEAP member, NYPD, ret.

  • joeyrockx

    Any kid that says marijuana is safer than alcohol is right. Not that I want my kids doing anything, but if the big three, marijuana is by far the safest. And it’s the easiest to test for? So it’s the easiest behavior to correct. Either way the fear mongering and “reefer madness” is silly. You don’t have to make these wild stories up to keep kids from smoking pot. It isn’t the devil, it’s not going to kill them or make them retarded, it won’t cause them to run through the streets like a wild mad man. Lets just stick to reality and treat kids with respect. It is a drug that isn’t for kids unless prescribed by a doctor, they shouldn’t use it. But comparing marijuana with alcohol is like comparing a loaded gun with a spit ball, just stop.

  • MikeParent
  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Kevin-Hunt/100003205282238 Kevin Hunt

    Anyone like C*ntstine Hatum that supports marijuana prohibition also supports racism.

    Meet Matthew Fogg, a former U.S. Marshal whose exploits led him to be nicknamed “Batman.” When he noticed that all of his team’s drug raids were in black areas, he suggested doing the same in the suburbs.“If we were locking up everybody, white and black, for doing the same drugs they would’ve done the same thing with prohibition, they would’ve outlawed it,” Fogg says in the video produced by Brave New Films. “If it were an equal enforcement opportunity we wouldn’t be sitting here anyway.”http://colorlines.com/archives/2012/11/dea_agent_says_he_was_told_not_to_enforce_drug_laws_in_white_areas.html

  • DTPyeahUCME

    Another article about cannabis and children that you may like, Ms young.  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/31/alex-echols-marijuana-autistic-rages_n_2552004.html

  • JW

    To whom it may concern,
         One will fine users of tobacco as describing some of it’s effects as beneficial to them. Similarly, the purported salubrious effects of marijuana (mj) are vastly outweighed by it’s deleterious effects. Perhaps for the rare cancer patient, especially given the diagnosis, it has a niche.  But the detrimental effects, some of which are noted in the USA Today link, should be a compelling argument against legalizing it. As if youth need another deleterious adult behavior to emulate(and which is arguably much more detrimental to them).
         Although the study can never be done, anyone who has been around the block knows of the anti-motivational aspect of ‘mj’. Likewise, although the numbers will never be found, and the assertion castigated as outrageously prejudiced, the percent of individuals using mj for ill-defined diagnosis who are on welfare significantly outnumbers those users not on welfare.
         As the denominator grows with regular use of mj, the effects of the accompanying toxins associated with inhaling smoke will inevitably create a list like tobacco’s. Tobacco should be illegal as should mj and the fines should be commensurate with their cost to society in healthcare dollars. At a minimum, the taxes need to be huge and applied healthcare costs as well as to educating about the damaging aspects of the indulgence. Prison sentences are absurd.
         The argument that it is less of an evil than alcohol is specious. Filtered cigarettes are less of an evil than filtered cigarettes. Additional, the denominator for mj is no-where near to that of alcohol. How will one determine if an accident is mj related given the half-life of thc?
          But as society slides down the slope so aptly described by Gibbons of Rome, rational concerns will give way to perceived emotional mandates.  Everyone should be able to do what ever they want as long as it doesn’t ‘hurt’ anyone else, correct?  Please define hurt.
    Respectfully,
    JW, M.D.

    • enchentez

      Oh, lookie, another ignorant prohibitionist pandering hysterical appeals to ignorance, innuendo and Anslingerian propaganda that has been long debunked. Thurstone pay you to make your unsupported assertions here, like he sent his wifey/mommy/yap dog ChtistineTaterT*at here to shill?

    • enchentez

      MD, my ass. And again, the entire “kids” argument is a red herring. NO ONE IS PROPSING HANDING OUT CANNABIS TO KIDS, IDIOT.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Kevin-Hunt/100003205282238 Kevin Hunt

      USA Today is a tabloid that spouts non-science.  Don’t even try to compare cannabis to tobacco.  Cannabis does not cause cancer…tobacco does.  Thanks to vaporizers and edibles available at dispensaries, no one has to ‘smoke’ marijuana anymore.  

      You are right that the numbers don’t support your ‘welfare-marijuana’ link.  In fact, states that have used drug testing for welfare applicants have found that the applicants have failed tests for all drugs at a lower rate than the general public.

      Damaging effects of the indulgence?  Canadian researchers have estimated the cost at $20 per user per year.

      The ‘THC-accident’ claim is bunk, too.  There are no statistics on “THC-related accidents” because they are so rare.

      “Tobacco should be illegal”?  How are you going to get a jury of peers to send someone to prison for cigarettes?  You really are s tu pid, aren’t you?

      You are not a doctor and you don’t even play one on TV.

  • DTPyeahUCME

    I just came across this incredible video (filmed in Colorado) of a patient who suffers from epilepsy, chronic head pain and a movment disorder from his epilepsy.  He has been off of pharmaceuticals for some time now and has not suffered seizure in almost three years.  This video shows in real time him smoking a CBD heavy strain of cannabis and you can see his clenched hands release as the cannabis calms his muscles. as time goes on, he begins to speak and talks about his experiences.  I hope you can watch this and get a sense of what kind of good scientific research could do in this area if the Federal Government would release cannabis from the grips of NIDA and the DEA.
     
    http://www.tokeofthetown.com/2013/02/powerful_video_shows_instant_relief_for_epileptic_cannabis_patient.php

  • HeardItAllBefore

    For more information, go to http://smartapproaches.com

  • http://twitter.com/HempShare HempShare

     Instead of cherry-picking citations to advance an agenda — which is typical of marijuana-legalization proponents — she summarizes the findings of all of the most recent top, government-funded studies on cannabis.
    Cherry pick this.

    Why is HEMP illegal when SINCE 2000, Orincon Cameras have been available to detect the difference between Hemp and Cannabis from 5000 feet in the air, or 100s of yards away on the ground.

    I hope ALL those who are against Hemp/Cannabis/Marijuana are denied the opportunity to same their lives, or relieve their suffering with hemp if the chance ever becomes them.

    May you suffer the fate that all those whom have died due to this miraculous plant being prohibited.

    HEMP is the Canary in the Coal Mine. The Big Lie.

    :)

  • Lucy gray

    Excellent quality articles are here. This is good site with useful info.

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