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Monday, January 14, 2013

Companies Try To Limit Digital Distractions

From Facebook to Gchat, there is no shortage of digital distractions at work. (Sebastian Willnow/dapd/AP)

From Facebook to Gchat, there is no shortage of digital distractions at work. (Sebastian Willnow/dapd/AP)

As technology connects us more and more effortlessly to all aspects of work, come companies are trying to disconnect employees both at work and at home.

Atos, a global IT services company based outside of Paris with 74,000 employees, is doing its best to phase out all internal e-mails.

German auto manufacturer, Daimler AG, is doing its best to get employees to disconnect when they’re not at work.

In response to a study of employees’ work and rest habits, they recommend employees not be responsive 24/7. They’ve even created a program to delete an employees incoming e-mail while they are on vacation.

Guests:

  • Wilfried Porth, in charge of human resources at Daimler AG.
  • Rachel Emma Silverman, reporter for The Wall Street Journal.

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