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Thursday, January 10, 2013

Aurora Mass Shooting Survivor With Ties To Newtown Becomes Activist

Stephen Barton, 22, was struck by 25 shotgun pellets in face, neck, arms and chest in July 2012, when a shooter opened fire inside a movie theater in Aurora, Colo.

He had been on a cross-country bicycle trip with a friend when they decided to go to a midnight showing of “The Dark Knight Rises.”

Barton survived the mass shooting and came back home to Southbury, Conn., just minutes away from Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., where a shooter killed 20 children and 6 adults last month.

Barton is now an anti-gun activist working as outreach and policy associate for Mayors Against Illegal Guns, a group co-chaired by New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

Here’s Barton in a September 2012 ad, calling on both presidential candidates to offer plans to prevent gun violence:

Guest:

  • Stephen Barton, gun control activist and mass shooting survivor. He tweets @scubarton.

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Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

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